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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 13, 1942 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MAICHI~GAN flI Y

FRMf AYFDUARI sm M194

___
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Men Can't Enlist
After Draft Call
LANSING, Feb. 12. -(A')- Draft,
registrants submitting to Army phys-
ical examinations are denied the
right to enlist in anyi branch of the
armed forces, except as flying cadets,
under provisions of new Selective
Service orders.
The new orders, according to
Selective Service officials, are de-
signed to prevent upsets in filling in-
duction quotas by enlistments of men
about to be drafted. Col. E. M. Rose-
crans, State Selective Service idrec-
tor, informed draft boards hence-
forth to advise registrants called for
physical examinations that it will.be
too late to enlist if found physically
fit by Army examiners.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
TYPING
MISS ALLEN--Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
WANTED TO BUY
MEN'S AND LADIES' CLOTHING,
suits, overcoats, typewriters, musi-
cal instruments, ladies' furs, Per-
sian lamb, mink; watches, dia-
monds. Pay from $5 to $500.
Phone Sam, 3627. 229c
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-
ng. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 60
WASHED SAND AND 'GRAVEL-.
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 70
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY-- 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
BEAUTY SHOPS
PERMANENTS, $3.00-$7.00. Sham-
poo and set, 65c all week. Gingham
Girl Beauty Shop, 302 S. State.
Phone 2-4000.
LOST and FOUND
LOST--A multicolored Waterman
eversharp with name Alvira Sata.
If found call 2-3225. Reward.

Singapore Observer

600 'Guys With
As Bomb4Diori
L02 ANGELES Fog, b. I2 2

Slight, grey-haired C. Yates Mc-
Daniel (above), a member of the
Associated Press staff, is the only
American newspaperman to cover
the nine-day siege of the Island of
Singapore and the only foreign
newspaperman to remain now in
the battle of the island itself.
Governor Asks
Pension Raiise
Message To Legislature
ProposesAid Change
LANSING, Feb. 12.-(-P)-Liberal-
ization of the old age assistance pro-
gram was proposed to the legisla-
ture by Governor Van Wagoner to-
day in a special message calling for
action on 17 new bills.
Legislative observers said a deci-
sions in the Senate to sidetrack, at
least temporarily, a planned investi-
gation of Unemployment Compensa-
tion Commission and liberalization of
the commission's program was due
partly to the new avalanche of bills.
Van Wagoner asked $1,600,000 be
appropriated by the current special
session to increase old age assistance
benefits and those for mothers of
dependent children.
The Governor asserted the increase
would permit old age assistance pay-
ments to be raised from an average
of $18.15 per month to an average of
$20 a month.

"This,'" the man said, "is strictly a
job for guys with guts. No others
need apply."
Yet without solicitation, almost
without fanfare, 600 men have ap-
plied. They are willing to risk death
as members of the city's bomb dis-
posal squads.
InLondon, they call them "suicide
squads." That will give you an idea.
Their task is to dig up unexploded
bombs which an enemy may some
day unload over this sprawling city,
biggest on the Pacific coast. The
missiles may be duds, harmless as
hot water bottles.
Or they may be delayed action
bombs, ready to blast anyone nearby
,into eternity.
Deputy Police Chief Homer B.
Cross is in general charge of the
organization. Each police precinct
will have its own squad, in command
of detectives trained for years to
handle a different type'of bomb-
the kind agitators or cranks might
have fashioned.
Aside from the police commanders,
the squads will be made up of volun-
teers-civilians with steel nerves and
plenty of intestinal fortitude.
They'll be on call the minute an
air raid siren sounds, ready to speed
to the spot where an unexpected
bomb has dropped, dig it out, load
it on a cart and hustle it to an iso-
lated disposal ground.
Hollywood and West Los Angeles
volunteers include virtually all of the
movies' stunt men, members of that
exclusive club to which death defi-
ance is an every-day proposition.
They're valued not only for their
New Merger
IApproved By
SDDMeeting
The Michigan Chapter of the Stu-
dent Defenders of Democracy voted
yesterday to follow its parent organ-
ization into the Student League of
America.
In voting to merge with the newly-
formed national progressive organ-
ization, SDD accepted fully the con-
stitution and program written at the
National Student Merger Conven-
tion, where the formation of the
Student League of America took
place during the Christmas recess.
The program of the Student League
of America stresses first and fore-
most the winning of the war in
which we are now engaged. Also
emphasized is the maintenance of
our democratic rights and privileges
in the course of the war, and the
formation of a world-wide demo-
cratic federation. _:
Domestic problems are not, how-
ever, neglected in the program.
Great importance is laid to the con-
tinuance of social and economic
gains, and to further measures in
the same direction.
With its entrance into the Stu-
dent League of America, SDD be-
comes part of a nation-wide student
organization, embracing such youth
groups as the Student League for
Progressive Action and the College
Division of the Committee to Defend
America.
Michigan Section
Of AICE To Hear
Professor Dow
The Michigan section of the Ameri-
can Institute of Civil Engineers will
meet Tuesday, Feb. 17, at 8 p.m. in
the Rackham Building to hear a
talk by Prof. W. G. Dow of the
electrical engineering department.
Professor Dow, who has written a

text on Electrionics and who is now
engaged in confidential defense re-
search work, will talk on the subject,
"Electrinics and Industrial Applica-
tion." Refreshments and a short
business meeting will follow his talk.
The Lansing student chapter of
the AIEE will come to Ann Arbor
and attend the meeting as guests of
the University's student group. They
will be shown through the engineer-
ing college laboratories and will be
guests at a dinner in the Union that
evening.

Guts' Get Job
ng Suicide Squad
courage, but for their ability to think
fiast, react instantly.
"Hollywood bomber squads," they
have named themselves.
"Sure it's dangerous," said Buddy
Roosevelt, a movie stunter who has
been cheating death for years.
"So what? We're used to that.
And believe me, son, when your
number's up it'll get you anyway."
Guts is right, Chief Cross.
Forest Fire
Control Work
To Be Taught
Three opportunities exist in the
West for men interested in forest fire
control work this summer, Dean S. T.
Dana of the School of Forestry and
Conservation announced yesterday.
The first training opportunity is at
Oregon State College which will take
men of upper high school age and
college students into a group called
the "Oregon Red-Hats." This three
year old organization will give the
men intensive forestry training, pro-
viding they are in good physical con-
dition and are willing to abide by a
low basic rate of pay in camp, gamb-
ling on being frequently called to
fight fires at good wages.
Basic pay will be $30 per month for
high school men and $50 per month
for college students in addition to
board and lodging. Travel expenses
to and from the camp must be borne
by the applicants.
A similar school near Missoula,
Mont., will probably be conducted
for the Inland Empire forest region,
Dean Dana pointed out. In this case,
an announcement will be made later.
A third opportunity for summer
employment exists with the Regional
Forest Service Headquarters at Mis-
soula, Mont., said Dana, which wants
husky college students for full sum-
iner work manning forest fire look-
out stations, fighting white pine blis-
ter rust, and reducing fire hazard in
sale areas of timber. Men accepting
these jobs will be expected to be on
call for fire fighting service. Wages
will range from $125 to $140 per
month.
Further information may be se-
cured from the Registrar's Office of
the School of Forestry and Conser-
vation, Room 2048 Natural Science
Building until the 25th of this month.
Pension Plan
May Be Killed
Retirement Scheme Scored
By Congressmen
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12. -()- A
new move for quick repeal of legis-
lation granting retirement pay to
members of Congress was launched
today by Representative Nichols
(Dem.-Okla.).
The Oklahoman said he expected
to have at least 250 signaturesr-more
than a majority-by next Tuesday
night on a petition urging the Civil
Service Committee to bring to the
floor a repeal bill now pending.
"I am convinced that if a major-
ity of the members of the House sign
the petition, the Civil Service Com-
mittee will be compelled to heed
their demands," he said.
On the House floor, the campaign
of daily speeches against the pen-
sion act continued. Representative
Knutson (Rep.-Minn.) concluded his
criticism with the remark:
"If there's anything in the world

more cowardly than a Congressman,
it's two Congressmen."
Marley Speaks Today
On 'Arming For Peace'
Definite techniques for the estab-
lishment of a lasting peace and
methods of correcting the effects
of war's impact on the world will
be thesubject of a talk, "Arming for
Peace," by The Rev. Harold P. Mar-
ley, pastor of the Unitarian Church,
8:15 p.m. today at Hillel Foundation's
Fireside Discussion Group.
Courses of action after the peace
is made will be analyzed and dis-
cussed by Reverend Marley. Ques-
tions and open forum discussion will
follow the initial presentation of the
topic.
4 A Ek u "

Laura Ingalls On Trial

There will be a meeting of try-
outs for the Gargoyle business
staff at 3:30 p.m. today in the Stu-
dent Publications Building. All
eligible freshmen and sophomores
are invited to attend.

All second semester freshmen;
I once liked to write sports. Now
I'm cured. Try out for the Michi-
ganensian editorial staff today at
4:15 p.m. and write all you want.

..

.;..

-- i

GALEN'S and SCHRAFFT'S
CHOCOLATES

IN HEART-SHAPED BOXES
FOR YOUR VALENTINE

We will wrap, mail and deliver for you.

Swift's Drug Store

Phone 3534

DELIVERY SERVICE

340 South State

Headquarters for MANHATTAN SHIRTS
"We Se/ve to Serveg 4c
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
-- -* *******3**S*UU 3 *lS3*U..... . -U . - - - - -z --- - s - - - r- -

f

Laura Ingalls (above), noted
woman speed flier, waits in an
anteroom in Washington during
an interim in the opening Argu-
ments of her trial in federal court
on charges of being a Nazi agent.
She was variously described as a
"missionary for the Nazi cause,"
and as an egotistical patriot con-
ducting a one-woman counter-
espionage campaign.
Technci Seeks
qew Writers
Oldest Campus Publication
Offers Varied Positions
Inadvertently omitted from yes-
terday's Activities Supplement of
The Daily, The Michigan Technic
offers valuable experience to engin-
eering students with a liking for
writing, selling or accounting, pho-
tography, art work and many other
fields.
Now in its sixtieth year, The Tech-
nic is not only the oldest publication
on the Michigan campus, but is the
oldest of its type in the entire coun-
try.
The monthly magazine is published
entirely by undergraduate students
in the engineering college, and aims
to report on new and interesting de-
velopments ini engineering, trends
affecting engineers as individuals
and as a group and other subjects
of interest to the students.
Previous experience is helpful but
not necessary, the staff emphasizes,
as a training program will be con-
ducted during the coming semester
for freshmen interested in trying out
for the staff.
The Technic's excellence as an en-
gineering magazine is proven by the
many awards it has received in na-
tional contests.
Engineering freshmen interested in
working on The Technic staff may
call at The Technic office, 3306 East
Engiheering Building, or contact any
present Technic staff member.
Club To Hold Meeting
The Pharmacy Journal Club will
hold its bi-weekly meeting Monday in
the Chemistry Building when it
meets to discuss topics which will be
presented by three pharmacy stu-
dents.

,J
i
I

SENDHER FLOWERS
FLOWERS make the ideal' - the perfect
valentine for mother, sister or sweetheart
- We are equipped to send the best any-
where.
QUALITY - SPEED - CONVENIENCE
Chelsea Flower Shop
203 East Liberty Phone 2-5616

Z7 "3ar#ious ygdatqcgta/s"
IN ONE EASY LESSON...

lop
u
' y
is
I.Jo

Here's all you need do. Just remember that
Manhattan shirts are Size-Fixt (average fabric
shrinkage 1% or less) Man-Formed to your
figure and Collar-Perfect in a style to suit your
face. That's all- these are the famous Man-
hattan Fundamentals that have sold millions
of Manhattan shirts to men in college and out.
Follow the Fundamentals for finer, better fit-
ting shirts-get some Manhattans today.

.
t

I

P
Bi

MONEY-SAVING
SPECIALS
FRIDAYS SPECIALS
NOON
imento Cheese sandwich
Soup
Choice of - a Salad or Dessert 2
Beverage
roiled Lake Trout
Bread or Rolls
Choice of - Potato or a Vegetabple
Choice of - a Salad or Dessert4
Beverage
NIGHT
rambled Eggs and Fruit Sauce
Bread or Rolls
Choice of - Potato or a Vegetable
Choice of - a Salad or Dessert 44c
Beverage
oast Loin of Pork
Bread or Rolls
Choice of -Potatoes or a Vegetable
Choice of - a Salad or Dessert
Beverage

THEY BELONG IN YOUR WARDROBE

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USED

BOOKS

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or NEW if you prefer
STUDENT SUPPLIES
for All Departments

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