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March 24, 1942 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-03-24

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

R

Russian Relief
To Be Subject
Of Discussion
RWR Group To Sponsor
Meeting Tomorrow;
Rabbi Fran To Speak
Representatives of the first estate
will discuss "Russian Offensive and
the Increased Need for Russian Re-
lief," at the meeting of the student
RWR organization scheduled for 8
p.m. tomorrow in the Michigan
League Chapel.
Guest speaker Rabbi Leo Fram of
Detroit will talk on the humanitarian
aspect of RWR, as will his colleagues
of the local clergy, Rev. Edward
Blakeman, University Counselor of
Religious Education; Rev. Leonard
Parr, of the First Congregational
Church; Rev. H. P. Marley, of the
Unitarian Church, and Rabbi Jehu-
dah Cohen, of Hillel.1
.Rabbi Fram is now with Temple
Israel in Detroit, after 16 years as
Associate Rabbi at Temple Beth-El.
He is also President of the Religious
Education Association, a non-sectar-
ian organization, and district chair-
man of the speakers' bureau, Division
of Allied Jewish Welfare campaign.
Harry Stutz, Grad., chairman of
the student RWR unit, extends an
invitation to the meeting to all who
are interested in the project. Plans
will be made for raising additional
funds for this cause, in an effort to
boost the $800 already collected to
$1,500 by the end of the term. This
sum will be used to keep alive "100
wounded Red Army soldiers," ac-
cording to Stutz.
Big Ten
Highhlights...
By PAUL KEENAN
In marked contrast to previous
years when they had knock-down
drag-out brawls in the campus streets
and buildings, this year the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin's self-styled
"plumbers" and "shysters" confined
their battles to a debate.
Before 1939 each St. Patrick's Day
saw the engineers smearing the law
buildings with green paint after
the "plumbers" had elected one of
their members an honorary St. Pat-
rick. In 1939 the plumbers kid-
napped the leader of the lawyers and
paraded him around Madison in an
iron-barred cage.
The lawyers retaliated with rotten
egg attacks and both classes eventu-
ally had to bail many of their leaders
out of the local jail. The coeds in a
dormitory helped out the lawyers
with water bombs dropped on the
heads of the engineers from the dorm-
itory roof, but the undaunted plumb-
ers invaded the building and planted
a stink-bomb in the girls' elevator.
But the war caused the end of gory
old days, to the disgust of the student
body and the relief of the gendarmes.
Students at the University of In-
diana are conducting a contest to
pick "The Man the Women Can't
Bear to Live Without." Announced
at "The Commons," which is the
Hoosier equivalent of a Coke-Bar,
the contest has already drawn 10
entries-three seniors, six juniors
and a single lone sophomore. Voting
is open to coeds only.
University of Iowa students have
handed together into the Phoenix
Club, and all funds taken into the
club will be placed in trust with the
university for the purpose of buying
bonds to supply scholarships for
needy ex-student World War II vet-

,rans. The plan is similar to others
in operat ion all over the country and
has its Michigan counterpart in the
Bomber-Scholarship fund.
Fifty Speakers
To Participate
In State Meet
(Cnlinued from Page 1)
ing the round tables and in their con-
cluding speeches will be judged, and
one contestant from all the seven
tables will be selected to participate
in the evening extemporaneous con-
test.
These round table discussions will
be conducted by graduate students of
the University speech department.
They are Virginia Connell, Mrs. Mary
Margaret Gibson, Donald Hargis, Ev-
elyn Keniessor, Hugh Norton, Archie
Thmas and Prof. Harry Williams.
In the evening session, the seven
contestants will first speak extempo-
raneously on some phase of Pan-
American relations. Following this
the speakers will be given two min-
utes in which to question one of the
other contestants on some details of
his spechl. Concluding the contest,
the participants will present a three
mitiute summary.
Two winners will be chosen from

73anjo King' Peabody To Appear
On U Of M Program In Detroit

., ,_ _

Great Lakes Musical Head
To Be Guest Conductor
At Annual Alumni Event
From king to naval officer!
That's the story of Lieut. Comm.
Edwin E. Peabody, director of music
at the U.S. Naval Training Station at
Great Lakes, Ill., and when U of
M Night rolls around to Detroit
Thursday he'll climb momentarily
back onto his throne-as "The Ban-
jo King."
Scheduled to appear as guest con-
ductor on the annual program pre-,
sented by the University Concert!
Band and the University of Michi-
gan Club of Detroit, Commander
Peabody will also give an example
of the banjo playing which has al-
ready pleased thousands of recruits
at Great Lakes.
Stage, Screen Star
A star of motion pictures, radio
and stage for over 16 years, Com-
mander Peabody has appeared as a
headliner on the stage of every im-
portant theatre in this country and
in Europe.. Though most famous as
a banjo wizard, he can actually play
29 other instruments with skill.
The patriotic theme of the annual
program will be maintained by the
playing of the University Concert
Band under the direction of Prof.
William D. Revelli, and the presence
of a contingent of guest sailors will
make the evening still more enthusi-
astic.
Next to the playing of the band

and Commander Peabody, probably
the biggest attraction of the eve-
ning will be the acting of female im-
personator Mike Ames in the title
role of "Bertha, The Sewing Machine
Girl."
This melodramatic relic of the gay
nineties will also introduce Waldo
Fellows and Dick Forsyth as well as
other former Union opera stars who
have been assigned parts in the pre-
sentation. Chorus "girls" from this
year's Opera, "Full House," will com-
plete the roster of entertainers.
Psurfs Will Sing
The singing of the Psurfs, hits of
the 1941 show, and community sing-
ing by the audience led by Donn
Chown, '40, will round out the pro-
gram.
Profits from U of M Night '42 are
to go to the Army and Navy Recrea-
tion League, in addition to a regu-
lar contribution to a University
Scholarship Fund. The Detroit Al-
umni hope to raise enough money to
furnish some Michigan camp with a
completely equipped recreation room.
Lit School Senior Dues
Must Be In By Friday
Senior dues of lit school students
are being collected from 9 a.m. to
noon and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. through
Friday of this week at a table on the
campus diagonal.
They are also being taken in the
Angell Hall lobby from. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. for the same period. Those who
do not pay their dues will be unable
to buy senior announcements or have
their names listed therein.

i

Whoever

She
Be -

May

' Whether the maharajah'sdaughter or just another cute Michigan coed, she

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You, too, can be the

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There's no reason to take the chance of wearing a soiled shirt or waiting

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Instead, try our laundry service.

bu ltons on sIeeves
In 1364, John Brandon had numerous buttons up to
the clbows of hisundervest so he could get his hauds
through the tight sleeves. Buttons were also used on
cuffs of jackets so that the wearer could push through
his ruffled cuffs. Frederick the Great ordered buttons
put on the sleeves of uniforms to discourage the use
of cuffs instead of handkerchiefs. 0% 42 'v urIP ,

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SAMPLE
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6 Handkerchiefs

BUNDLE

5

Finished
mended and
Buttons
Replaced
Returned
Dried and
Fluffed _
not Ironed.

2 Suits of Underwear
1 Pajama Suit
2 Bath Towels

Approximate Cost...$1.10

I ____- _______ __

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23-1

-23

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