100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 22, 1942 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUPPLEMENT

i'Lg

Lw A

Ar
INV,

SUPPLEMENT

i

ANN ARBOR, MIChIGAN. SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1942

New Faces

May.

..19421

Music
Traubel Had
Sudden Rise
To Suceesst
Achieved Fame As Great'
Artist After Outstanding
Performances In 1939
Is New Wagnerian
Hope Of 'The Met'

Festival

To

Be

Held Ma6-
y6,I

C+}

Scene Of May Festival

HELEN TRAUBELF
Emerging in a single season as
one of the greatest sopranos in this
country ... for Americans her suc-
successes have held special signifi-
cance as hiers were the triumphs
of a native American artist and of
an art inspired and developed en-
tirely within her native landw.
began her career in St. Louis.

Two months and a war-in those
words a description of the triumph
of Helen Traubel as one of the great
sopranos of all time.
A first Town Hall recital in Octo-
ber, 1939, a scoast-to-coast broad-
cast on the Ford Hour the following
Sunday, followed by her Metropoli-
tan Opera debut as Sieglinde in "Die
Walkure," in Decemhber, and within
two months a practically unknown
young soprano had risen to fame and
has now replaced kirsten Flagstad,
stranded in Norway by the war, as
the Metropolitan's Wagnerian hope.
Native Artist
The triumph of Helen Traubel has
special meaning for American music
lovers, because she is a native Ameri-
can artist. Thus her success is an
American success in the annals of the
Metropolitan Opera, long dominated
by artists of foreign nationalities.
Miss Traubel began her vocal
studies in St. Louis, her birthplace.
She was still only an attractive home-
town girl singing with the St. Louis
Symphony when brought to the at-
tention of Walter Damrosch. Com-
ing to St. Louis to conduct a Saeng-
erfest in 1935, the venerable sage of
W agnerian opera waxed indignant
when first asked to conduct for Helen
Traubel. But he was ,of a different
ind after he heard the unknown
soprano make her way skillfully
through one of the most difficult of
all operatic arias, the great "Libestod".
fron "Tristan and Isolde:' Two
years later Miss Traubel made her
first Metropolitan appearance in a
role written especially for her by
Damrosch in his opera "The Man
Without a Country."
Sang On Radio
For more than a year afterwards
Miss Traubel was star on a major
network weekly radio program. For
a year and a half she redred from
professional appearances to devote
herself to intensive preparation for
the achievement of her greater goal,
Wagnerian opera. Then foiowed her
unforgettable smash success scason of
1939.
Last year, in addition to her Metro-
pclitan appearances, lielen Traubel
filled two cross country concert tours.

A Message
This is the 49th Annual May
Festival. The number is nearing
the half-century mark. Born dur-
ing the hard-times period in 1894,
the institution has weathered many
a gale. This has been due in large
measure to the loyalty and the sym-
pathetic cooperation of a culture-
minded public, which at all times
has supported the University Musi-
cal Society in its endeavors.
Mindful of all of this, and firm-
ly believing that good music is of
special importance and significance
during periods of natonal crises,
the Society this year has taken even
greater pains in building a series of
programs of outstanding merit, and
has chosen the most distinguished
performers. In so doing, the Soci-
ety believes that it is carrying out
the ideals of its founders, and the
desires of its patrons and well-wish-
ers.' It has full confidence that
members and friends of the Uni-
versity, as well as the public in gen-
eral, will continue their gracious co-
aperation, to the end that one and
all may acquire renewed courage
and fortitude in solving the na-
,ional fand personal problems with
which so many of us at the present
time are confronted.
The Musical Society thanks the
public for its long years of con-
structive support. -Charles A. Sink

,

Programt For 1942 May Festival

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 6
Soloist:
MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto
THE PH IIADELPHIA ORCIESTRA
i- vcGNF ORM ANDY, Condtctor
PRO( AI \
Overture in D minor Iland°l-Onr
Air, "All is Fulfilled" J. S.
Aria, "Piangero mia sorte n a,"
from Julius Caesar". I
Marian Anderson
Symphony in 1) major; K.V. 504 (Prague) A
"San Juan Capistrano" Nocturnes ..fHar M L
"Pleurez mes yeux," from "Le Cid" Ma
Miss Anderson
Orchestral Fragnents from "Daphnis et Chk
Second Suite
Waltzes from "Der Rosenkavalier" .

FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 8
Soloist:
HELEN TRAUBEL, Soprano
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
E:UGENF ORMANDY, Conductor
PROGRAM
Overture to "Tannhauser" ,........... W

inandyv
i. 3ac '
lo",t
Rat d
Strazesx

Vagner

CARROLL GLENN
First came to the attention of
the musical public when she won
both the Naumburg Award and the
Town Hall Award in 1939 . . . she
is a native of South Carolina .
a year ago she received the Na-
tional Federation of Music Clubs'
award of $1,000 and also the Schu-
Lert Memorial Award..

Schmerzcn .... ......... W
Traumet . . . . . . . . . . . W
[IsTraume ..................... W
Elsa's Traumne .. ...W
from "Lohengrin"
Helen Traubel
Prelude and Love Death from
"Tristan and Isolde"............ W
Excerpts from "Gotterdanmerung" .. , W
Siegfried's Rhine Journey
Siegfred's Funeral March
Brunnhilde's Immolation and Closing Scene,
Miss Traubel
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 9
Soloist:
SERGEI RACHMANINOFF, Pianist
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
FUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
PROGRAM
(All-Rachmaninoff)
"The Isle of the Dead,"
Symphonic Poem after Bocklin, Op. 29
Symphonic Dances, Op. 45

agner
agner
agner

agner
agner

11 Soloists, Three
Groups To ear
Fo SX Concerts
PI
Five Distinguished Artists To Make Local
Debut; Philadelphia Orchestra, Youth
Chorus, Choral Union To Participate
Eleven musical celebrities of world-wide reputation will participate in
the University Musical Society's 49th Annual May Festival, May 6, 7, 8,
and 9 in Hill Auditorium.
Six concerts in the four day period will see several old favorites of
Ann Arbor concert audiences return and will introduce five new faces.
Familiar to every local concert-goer are such artists as Marian Anderson,
contralto; Sergei Rachmaninoff, pianist; Emanuel Feuermann, violon-
cellist; Enid Szantho, contralto; Jan Peerce, tenor, and Mack Harrell,
baritone. The new faces include Helen Traubel, soprano; Judith Hell-
wig, soprano; Carroll Glenn, violinist; Felix Knight, tenor, and Rabbi Bar-
'Qnett R. Brickner, narrator.
dijFor Athe sixth season Eugene Or-
Ju it H lw mandy will lead the Philadelphia
Symphony Orchestra in the May
fn e 1 Festival concerts. H will be assisted
s 1.n by Saul Caston. T other musical
4' groups, the University Choral Union
Opera * Singer directed by Thor Johnson, conductor
for the University Musical Society,
and Miss Juva Hgbee's Youth Festi-
Achieved Early Success val Chorus will also be heard.
Marian Anderson will open the
In First Performance series on Wednesday night. Among
Miss Anderson's numbers will be the
Under Richard Strauss air, "All Is Fulfilled" by J. S. ach
and an Aria, "Piangero mia sorte ria"
Now in her second American sea- from Handel's "Julius Caesar." She
son, Judith Hellwig, soprano, comes will also sing "Pleurez mes yeux,"
to Ann Arbor with a varied European from "Le Cid" by Massenet..
operatic experience behind her. Instrumentalists Will Play
From the small city in Czecho- Three instrumentalists will appear
slovakia where'she was born, to the in the Thursday night, Friday after
State Academy of Music at Vienna, n and turday after -
to Switzerland, where Richard Strau noon and Saturday afternoon prro-
shto Switzerlan whe Richad trass grams. Emanuel Feuermann, violon-
chose her to sing the title role -of his cellist, will rwent-~Conerto for
opera 'Arabella" at its first perform- Violoncello and Orchestra,. Cr. 104,
ance, is the story of Miss Hellwig's by Dvorak, as the second half of the
rise to success in the music world. Thurakateoondam. te
Under Strauss' personal direction she Thursday afternoon program. On
als apeaed n anuberof isFriday afternoon Carroll. Glenn will,
also appeared in a number of his play Tschaikowsky's Concerto in D
other operas. major for Violin and Orchestra
Her career on the Continent also O Op35
includes appearances under Bruno Op.'35.
Walter, Erich Kleiber and Zemlinsky. Rachmaninoff will play in Ann
Hindemith selected her for the first Arbor for the first time with an or-
performance of his opera "Mathias chestra. The entire Saturday after-
der ormane " noon program, conducted by Mr. Or-.
During the short time she has been mandy, will be devoted to the pianist's
Dring thde sort time Aas been own composition. It will open with a
on this side of the AtlanticOcean, work entitled "The Isle of the Dead"
Miss Hellwig has duplicated her followed by "Symphonic Dances," O.
European success, both on the oper- 45. The Russian artist will play his
atic stage and in the concert hall. In Tne ruPian 2, In C mi
1941 she sang six.differ'ent roles atOn .
the celebrated Colon Opera in Buenos Op. 18.
Aire. Se alo apeaed i Bunos Three soloists, a narrator and the
Aires. She also appeared in Buenos Choral Union will combine in the-
Aires Bith Arturo Toscanini inhfour presentation of Honegger's King Da-
performances of Beethoven's Ninth id on Thursday night, King David
Symphony s will be portrayed by Rabbi Brickner.
This year Miss Hellwig has been Solo parts have been allotted to Miss
appearing with the Philadelphia Or- Helwiats a ntall and Mr..
chestra under Eugene Ormandy. One Hig, Miss Szantho and Mr.
of her performances was of Beethov- Knig'
en'sNinh Smphny, ive inNew Miss Higbee will conduct the Youth
en's Ninth Symphony, given in, New Festival Chorus in F tcher's "Wal-
Orleans. Two were of Verdi's Man- rus and the Carpenter" on Friday
soni Requiem and took place in Phila- and The Ca l Unon ill
delphia afternoon. The Choral Union will
make its final appearance in a per-
formance of Beethoven's Ninth Sym-
Society Boasts phony in the final concer Saturday
night. Solo roles will be sung by
. Miss Hellwig, Miss Szantho, Mr.
, P EXIStence Peerce and Mr. Harrell «
All the concerts will begin at 2:30
p.m and at 8:30 p.m. Doors will be
Sponsor. Of May Festival closed during numbers, Those who
leave the auditorium during the in-
Organized In 1879 termission will be required to pre-
sent door checks in order to reenter
Organized in 1879, the University the building.
Musical Society, sponsor of the May Present indications point to a. sell-
Festival, has maintained a continu- out for each concert of the May Fes-
ous existence on the Michigan cam- tival Series. Charles A. Sink, pres

pus, providing good music for the dent of the University Musical So-
University, the community and the ciety, urges everyone, planning to
country as a whole. attend the Festival to place their
The Society was incorporated in orders immediately at the Society's
1881 under the laws of the State of offices in the Burton Memorial
Michigan as a non-profit corpora- Tower.
tion. Since that time it has main-
tained its concert activities only
through the sale of admission tickets.,Co d c rJ hn n
In addition to the May Festival C nductor Johnson
concerts, the Society developed the Is Leading Figure
Choral Union Chorus and the Choral InFie l
Union Concert Series, providing Ann F i Of ML siC
Arbor with the best in both local and
world-famed musical artists and or- Conductor for the University Musi-
ganizations. The concert series, start- cal Society and of the May Festival
ing modestly, gradually grew to 10 concerts, Prof. Thor Johnson of the
annual performances. - School of Music stands out as a lead-
Dr. Charles A. Sink is president pf ing figure in musical America.
the Society. Other officers include His colorful career includes varied
President Alexander G. Ruthven, experience ,both here and abroad as
vice-president; Oscar A. Eber ach, violinist, conductor and student. He
treasurer; Shirley W. Smith, stcre- has conducted more than 300 ner-

THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 7
Soloists:
JUDITH IELLWIG, Soprano
NID SZANTHO, Contralto
FELIX KN\IGH T, 'Fe,7or
BAR.NELTT R. BRICKNER, Narra/or
EMA N UEL FEUE R MANN, Violomccilisi
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
THE PI1 LADIELPH IA ORCHESTRA
T* IOR joliNsoN, Corlnuctor
PRO(,RA\1
"King David," a Symphonic Psalm in
Three Parts, After a D rama nby
Rene Morax . h1oner
Soloists, Narrator, Chorus, and Orchestra
Concerto for Violoncello and
Orchestra, Op. 104 Dorak
Emanuel Feuermann
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 8
Soloist:
CARROLL GLEINN, Violinist
YOU H FESTIVAL CHORUS
TE PHI LADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
SAUL (ASvON and jOVA H I( Ail., Condn/t ors
I 1RO(RAM

JUDIT! HELLWIG
Born in a small Czechoslovak city
... her European background in-
eluded performances under Rich-
ard Strauss, Erich Kleiber and
Bruno Walter . . . she has ap-
peared in Amsterdam, Stockholm,
Budapest, Prague, Monte Carlo,
Brussels and London .. . she was
chosen by Hindemith for the first
performance of his opera, "Mathia
der Maler."

Singer Knight
Is Renowned
Despite Youth'
The career of Felix Knight, popu-
Air yric tenor, is proof that youth-
ulness is no bar to success in the
flusic world.
Despite his youth Knight has made
for himself an enviable reputation
in the fields of opera, concert, mo-
tion pictures, radio and recordings.
First major success came in 1935
when he sang the leading tenor role
in the Hollywood Bowl production of
"La Traviata." This led to his selec-
,ion for the leading role in "The
Damnation of Faust" with the -San
Francisco Opera Company. By thir
performance Knmht became the
youngest tenor to sing this role with
a major opera company and was.
thereafter recognized as ani outstand-
ing young tenor.
During the next two seasons Knight
appeared with the Hollywood Opera
Company in the leading tenor roles in
"Manon,"' "Rigoletto," and "Caval-
leria Rusticana." He has appeared
in a number of motion pictures, in-
cluding "Bohemian Girl," "Caravan,"
and "Babes in Toyland."
In 1938 Knight was finalist in the
Metropolitan Opera Auditions of the
Air. For the past several years he
has been heard constantly on some
of the most important radio programs
and has made numerous recordings.
Percival Price To Play
Special Carillon Concerts

v

Non allegro; Andante con moto
(Tempo di valse) ; Lento assai;
Allegro vivace
Concerto for Piano No. 2, in C minor, Op. 18
Moderato; Adagio sostenuto;
Allegro scherzando
Sergei Rachmaninoff
SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 9
Soloists:
JUDITH HELLWIG, Soprano
ENID SZANTHO, Contralto
JAN PEERCE, Tenor
MACK HARRELL, Baritone
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
TIIE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
I UGE NE ORMANDY, Conductor
PROGRAM
Toccata, Intermezzo and Fugue
in C major.... . ....... . . ... Bach-Ormandy
Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125 . . Beethoven
Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso
Molto vivace; Presto
Adagio molto e cantabile;
Andante moderato
Allegro assai
Soloists, Choral Union, and Orchestra

Overture to "Russian and Ludmilla"
Cantata: "The Walrus and
the Carpenter".
Youth Festival Chorus
Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"
Violin and Orchestra, Op. 35
Concerto in DI major for
Allegro moderato; Canzonetta;
Allegro vivacissimo
Carroll Gdenn
Polovtsian Dances from "Prince Igor"

Glinka
Fletcher

T sc/aik;ou'sk 'y
Tsba oi )

Ga rroll Glenn, Young Concert Star,
Is Noted American -Trained Violinist

Carroll Glenn, youthful violinist
and concert star, has been calle'd
"America's Own Violinist" for she
was not only born in the United
States, but she is also one of the
few noted concert performers ever
to receive all her training in this
country.
Miss Glenn and her family moved
to New York from their home in
South Carolina when she was only
11 so that Carroll might continue

lraduate School of Music and was
able to round out her musical educa-
tion enough so that in 1938 she was
the sole winner of the Walter W.
Naumburg Foundation' Award and
the attendant opportunity to appear
in a Town Hall recital.
That single performance won for
her the Town Hall Award for 1939
and an engagement on the 1939-1940
Town Hall Endowment Series. Awards

tra together so that he might audi-
tion her again with the benefit of
an orchestral background. The sec-
ond audition resulted in her appear-
ance in the Orchestra's Thursday-
Friday series, a complete triumph
for any young artist. And when she
appeared before Dimitri Mitropoulos,
he expressed amazement over the fact
that such playing should come from
a girl who had never gone to Europe

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan