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March 06, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

~t, ~t&UUU e, 1942

Gerhart Seger
Will Talk Here
On War, Peace

Japs'- ye View Of Brisbane Before The War Began

CDA
By
Of

Sponsors
Former
Germ an

Lecture
Member
Reichstag

Scheduled to speak under the aus-
pices of th e Ann Arbor chapter of
the Committee To Defend America,
Gerhart Seger will deliver a public
lecture on "Hitler's War-Our Peace"
at 4 p.m. Sunday in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
, Seger, a former member of the
German Reichstag and now a well-
known journalist and popular lec-
turer, will bring a wide knowledge
of Nazis and Nazi methods to the
itackham platform.
From 1920 to 1830, Seger was on
the Reichstag's Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee before his arrest by Hitler's
agents as a member of the German
Socialist Party.
-Seger was then placed in the no-
torious German concentration camp
at Oranienburg near Berlin where he
was confined before he finally es-
caped .to England. His experiences
going in and out of camp are the
subject of Seger's book, "Oranien-
burg."
Before coming to America, Seger
was faced with the problem of free-
ing his wife and daughter from a
concentration camp where they were
being held as hostages for his return.
They were finally released through
appeals from England.
Seger's lecture tours have already.
carried him through Ann Arbor. Last
year he addressed local audiences on
"The German Fifth Column" and
"What Confronts America."
Dean Edmonson
Dedicates Article
To George Myers,
To honor Prof.-Emeritus George
E. ,Myers, who retired from his posi-
tion in the School of Education at
the close of last semester, Dean
James B. Edmonson of the education
school has dedicated his editorial in
the February issue of the school's
Bulletin, distributed .today, to the
former professor of vocational edu-
cation and guidance.
A "Pioneer in vocational educa-
tion," according to Dean Edmonson,
Professor-Emeritus Myers has signed
out of active work in the school with
"What Is Guidance?" the leading ar-
ticle in the monthly publication.
In addition to this the Bulletin of-
fers a condensation of reports made
at -the symposium on "Frontier Prob-
lems in Industrial Arts, Vocational
Guidance and Vocational Education,"
the afternoon .program of this year's
Winter Conference on Educational
Problems held Jan. 24 in the League.
,This symposium was conducted in
honor of Professor-Emeritus Myers,'
who also gave a closing paper.
FRESHMEN -- TAKE HEED
Tickets for Frosh Frolic will be
sold today and through noon to-
morrow exclusively to the class of
45. After tomorrow noon, the
tieket sale will be open to the
entire student body.

Continued Japanese raiding stabs at Australia have brought about all-out preparations for war, when
it comes. This is a view of Brisbane, a city of 326,000 and capital of the state of Queensland.

t Got Plenty Of Nothin'
Thousands Of Detroit Laborers
Join Conversion-Blues' Chorus

(Editor's Note: what is happening
to the hundreds of thousands of auto
workers thrown out of jobs during
conversion of the industry to arma-
ment production? Wide World writer
Gladwin Hill gives a closeup picture
of the circumstances, problems and
feelings of two auto workers, chosen
at random.)
By GLADWIN HILL
DETROIT, March 5-(Wide World)
-Edward Hojnacki is 31, for the
last nine years has worked in the
Dodge transmission assembly de-
partment, and from the standpoint
of income is probably fairly repre-
sentative of the several hundred
thousand auto workers out of jobs
while the industry is being convert-
ed to armament production.
The average auto factory worker,
according to the Automobile Manu-
facturers Association, made $906 in
the tough year of 1938, $1,300 in 1939,
and about $1,500 in 1940.1
Hojnacki made $771 the first year,
$1,209 the second,:and $1,659 in 1940,
and somewhat less last year. In other
respects, Hojnacki's case may be a
little tougher than average . .
He has a wife and four children,
ranging inage from 10'to 12 They
Engineer Speaks
On 'Water Project
Robert Letts McNamee, practicing
industrial and construction engineer,
spoke yesterday at 7:30 p.m. in the
Union before a meeting of the stu-
dent chapter of the American Soci-
ety of Civil Engineers.
McNamee, chief engineer for a large
industrial firm and construction en-
gineer for a water supply project in
Ohio, spoke on the subject, "Water
Supply Problems of the Miami River
in Ohio."
Refreshments and a short business
meeting followed Mr. McNamee's
talk. Plans for the future publica-
tion of the "Bulldozer," official
ASCE news magazine, were dis-
cussed.

live in a six-room flat on the ground
floor of a shabby frame house in a
Polish Catholic section about eight
miles from the Dodge plant.
They pay $27 a month rent, with-
out heat, light or gas, and heat the
flat with two coal stoves, one in the
kitchen, one in the living room.
Not fancy, but a lot better than
the first flat he had after he got
married ("I only had seven cents to
my name . . .") which cost $18 a
month and had no hot water and no
bathtub-they had to heat water on
the stove and bathe in a washtub on
the floor.
Nor is he bitter. He is just be-
wildered by some economic circum-
stances that might bewilder a finan-
cial expert. He wonders how he can
support a family of five on $16 a
week or $20 a week, and he wonders
when "we'll get back to work again."
* .'.
Vincent Preis, an upholstery trim-
mer at the Chrysler plant, is consid-
erably better off.
He is 37, and likesHojnacki, was
born in Detroit." His father works
for Packard and his thee brothers
also work for Chrysler, two of them
being currently laid off like himself.
Preis has worked in the auto fac-
tories since he was 15, and now gets
$1.18 an hour. He has been married
for 10 years and has two boys, six
and four.
He lives in a five-room brick-ve-
neer house in the Packard section in-
to which he moved four years ago
and has been paying for at the rate
of $40 a month; his payments have
three more years to go. A year ago
he bought a 1937 Plymouth for $325,
on which the last payment is due.
The only really difficult period he
has experienced was in 1938, when
auto production dropped to only half
of the previous year, and he was laid
off from April to August.
Nevertheless, he hasn't much cash
ahead, And doesn't know how he is
going to stretch his $16 or $20 to meet
all his obligations. If he can arrange
moratoriums on his installment-plan
commitments, he thinks he might
squeeze by-if the layoff doesn't last
too long.
Realizing that upholstery skill is a
dubious asset in armament produc-
tion, he has signed up for six hours
a day of machine tool training in the
vocational education program so
he'll have a better chance of getting
a job.
A. Hitler, Of Moscow,
Registers For Draft
DETROIT.-(')-Hitler is in the
draft.
William H. Wells, chief clerk of
Detroit's draft board No. 23, dis-
closed today that one Adolph (the
man in Berlin spells it Adolf) Hitler
had registered Feb. 16.
Wells said that the man declared
himself to be 40 years old, native of
Moscow, Mich., unemployed, and liv-
ing at the Howard Street Mission for
the homeless.
The mission confirmed that Hitler
had been there on two over-night
visits within recent months, but said
it had no further information.

Student Panel
Will Hghl ight
Hillel Meeting
A student panel composed of David
Crohn, '43, Albert Cohen, '44, Sam
Rosen, '44, and Sid Sachs, '42, will
be featured at Hillel Foundation's
Fireside Discussion of "The Jew in
the Post War World" at 8:15 p.m. to-
day.
The members of the panel are the
squad of speakers selected to repre-
sent Hillel Foundation in nation
wide panel speech contests. Crohn
and Cohen compose the team with
Rosen and Sachs acting as alter-
nates.
The discussion will involve the
position of the Jewish people, especi-
ally those suffering the fascist op-
pression, at the peace conference and
the changed post war world. Vari-
ous problems arising from the alter-
ing conditions will be discussed.
Today's discussion is in line with
the series of Fireside Discussions
whose general subject is "The Jew
In a Changing, World." All discus-
sions are followed with questions and
discussions springing from the audi-
ence.
The team, now preparing for its
firstdelimination contests in the na-
tional, will first compete with Michi-
gan State College this month in a
panel discussion. Following the elim-
ination contest, the speakers will par-
ticipate in a formal debate with Ohio
State University Hillel Foundation.
Preceding tonight's discussion will
be conservative religious services at
7:30 p.m.
New Bomber
Scholarships'
Are Approved
(continued from age 1)
.House, the scholarship committee will
recommend it to the Committee on
Student Affairs with "whole-hearted"
backing.
The faculty group has passed on
the proposal, it was announced, while
advocating that "it should be left in
the hands of students as much as
possible."
Art Rude, '42, chairman of the
"bomber-scholarship" committee, re-
ceived another unanimous vote of ap-
proval when he brought the plan be-
fore the Committee of 1942. A sys-
tem of voluntary collection of con-
tributions will be worked out today in
a special sub-comittee meeting.
Suggested by Dick Shuey, '42, an
amendment was adopted to turn all
"bomber-scholarship" funds over to
the University scholarship committee
15 years after the war's end. This
move will eliminate any frozen funds
once ex-servicemen have been given
aid.
The plan, which will be submitted
Monday to the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs, provides for $100,000 in
contributions from social affairs.
This money, equal to the cost of a
bomber, will be deposited with the
University in the form of defense
bonds.
After the war, the fund will be
used to give scholarship aid to qual-
ified student ex-members of Ameri-
ca's armed gforces.

Engine Council
Plans Defense
Course Here
Publication Of 'The Arch',
Freshinati Engineering
Handbook, To Continue
The possibility of a special non-
credit course in civilian bomb pro-
tection and the continued publica-
tion of "The Arch" a freshman engi-
neering handbook, were established
at a regular meeting of the Engineer-
ing Council last night.
Definite plans for the course will
hinge upon student interest, which
will be determined as soon as pos-
sible. Prof. Glenn Alt of the civil
engineering department, recently re-
turned from a similar course in New
York, will probably take charge of
the instruction.
As a result of the approval of pres-
ent freshmen, obtained through a
survey Wednesday, it was also de-
cided at the meeting to continue the
publication of "The Arch," a maga-
zien which has been distributed to in-
coming freshmen each fall as a sort
of guidebook.
In addition to information on en-
gineering college traditions such as
the honor system, The'Arch also con-
tains names and pictures of all the
incoming freshmen, furthering intra-
class acquaintances and promoting
a feeling of comradeship.
Council president Bob Summer-
hays, '42E also announced that En-
gineeririg ouncil keys and senior
class rings would not be available
after Tuesday, March 10, and that
any students wishing to obtain either
should contact Joe Hallisey. '42E, be-
fore that date.
U.S. Citizens I
Await Chance
To Go Home
LONDON, March 5-(Wide World)
-The United States Embassy an-
nouncement that a few of the war-
isolated Americans who are here may
soon have a chance to go home has
added anxiety to the heartaches of
hundreds of young "dual citizenship"
mothers.
There are approximately 5,000
Americans in the British Isles who
were cut off from their homeland
when they missed the last of the re-
patriation ships in the summer of
1940.
They were advised recently by
Consul Glenn Abbey that a number
of non-priority steamship accommo-
dations were expected to be avail-
able soon and that the principle of
first-come-first-served would be fol-
lowed.
The ones who are beset by aixiety
are the American-born wives of Brit-
ish subjects. Most of them sent their
children to safety with parents and
friendsnbefore the war started. Be-
fore they know whether they will be
allowed to rejoin their children, they
will have days of anxious waiting.
Then, if permission is granted,
they must decide whether to gamble
with the perils of the Atlantic cross-
ing. The decision to leave also means
leaving husbands, possibly for the
duration.
"If any of us are allowed to go,
you can bet we won't tell our families
at home," said one woman who re-
mained in London throughout the
worst of the raids.
Round Table Will Hear
Armenian Student Talk
A meeting of the French Round

Table will be held at 8 p.m. today to
hear a lecture by Alice Jernazian,
Grad., on "L'Armenie et les Arme-
niens." Anyone who has a compre-
hensive knowledge of French is in-
vited to attend.
Miss Jernazian is in this country
now to continue her studies in phil-
ology.

FILTERED
~IVIPACKEDU ONLY IN THIS RFD& BLACK BOX
SMOKING== =
66Baffle Filterwhirl-cools smoke; traps juices, flakes
and nicotine in pipes, cigarette and cigar holders.
FINEST BRIAR MONEY CAN BUY

CLASSIFIED
HELP WANTED
MAN STUDENT to work for room,
334 Thompson. Phone 4494.
WANTED: Young man for messenger
and office work. Apply Postal
Telegraph, 112 E. Huron. 259c
TYPING
TYPING: L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED-One basic ROTC shirt.
Size 16. Phone 9741.
MEN'S AND LADIES' CLOTHING,
suits, overcoats, typewriters, musi-
cal instruments, ladies' furs, Per-
sian lamb, mink, watches, dia-
monds. Pay from $5 to $500.
Phone Sam, 3627. 229c

FOR REINT
DOU131,1:ROOM for men .Comn-
fortable, cleaul, wr.Close to
campus, 731 Haven, 6468.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price 2c
BEAUTY SHOPS
PERMANENTS, $3.00-$7.00. Sham-
poo and set, 65c all week, Gingham
Girl Beauty Shop, 302 S. State.
Phone 2-4000.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING--Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL--
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Light, shell-rimmed glasses
between Chemistry Bldg. and State
St. on North University. Call 8381.

Ir

warms of Oxford men
on campus

We mean, of course, men wearing oxford
shirts, the favorite fabric of undergrads.
popular of all oxfords is Arrow Gordon, for
very sound reasons:

cloth
Most
these

It has the best-looking of all possible collars-
your choice of regular, gently-rolling button-down,
or wide-spreads. It has the Sanforized label -
won't shrink even 1%. It has the "Mitoga" figure-
fit-no bunchiness. It has anchored buttons,
We have all sizes, whites and colors. Get some
today - with Arrow Ties to go with 'em.
SEE
S TA TE S T RE ET A T LIB E R TY

""

I

TWO SHOWS SUNDAY
.LA MATERNELLE"
CHILDREN Or MONTMARTRE
(with English titles)
The best picture present-
ed anywherein the world"
-N. Y. TIMES
~ ~r

r
'r

'All xx
s
y> ; l F
u l y'
S
c Y V; g
t - rr r 8 s

®

"""'"

Now Playing -
"'Hey, hepcots,
it's a dilly!... a ja
session of fun!"
1141<
t /

[HJere's a winner

THERE'SA MICHIGAN
CORPSE Double Feature Program
IN OUR You'll jo fun crazy with dizzy
CLOSET! Grac e-the rattle-brained,
U ale Sherlock Holmes!
I nVALLEN

NOW AWFUL!
NOW WE'LL
HAVE TO
FIND SOME
OTHER PLACE
TO STORE OUR
LIQUOR

on every campus!
FAVORITE of college men is the oxford cloth
shirt - and leader of the oxfords is Arrow
Gordon Oxford. It comes in the button-down,
regular and wide-spread collar models. Mitoga-

M~~andMR
NQRTH"
WM. POST, Jr.- PAUL KELLY
ROSE HOBART " VIRGINIA GREY
TOM CONWAY - FELIX BRESSART
STUART C)AWF&RD

tailored, Gordon will always keep
its fit, for it is labeled Sanforized
(fabric shrinkage less than 1%).
In whites, solids, and fancy pat-
terns. Get Arrow Gordon now!

0
0

EXTRA * Spotlight on Indo-China
0 The Lucky Duck (in color)

with -
lane Darwell - Bruce Edwards'
Cobina Wright, Ir. - Cecil Kellaway
Katharine Alexander - lack Searl

And get some Arrow lies
to go with it!

I

i

II

z "-,

A

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