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January 28, 1942 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-01-28

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1942

Petitions Due Feb.15 At Leag
For Jordan Student Assist

By GLORIA NISHONj
Petitions for positions as student1
assistants in Jordan Hall are due
Feb. 15 in the League, Miss Esther
Colton, House Director of Jordan,
announced yesterday.
The petitions are available in the
Undergraduate Office of the League.
Any upperclasswomen may apply and
the girls are chosen on the basis of
outstanding personality, scholarship
and character.
More specifically, the applicants
must be able to get along with peo-
ple, must be willing to accept respon-
sibility, must have the. qualities. of
leadership, good scholarship, fine
A Word To The Wise
On Making Elections
JACKSON, Miss., Jan. 27.--VP)--A
Red Cross volunteer first aid class
was studying what to do when a per-
son faints.
A .class member fainted.
The next session took up bandages
and splints.
During the lecture, .,a woman
stumbled at the clasroom door, fell
and fractured her wrist.
Tomorrow, the class studies gun-
shot wounds.

character and a well-round
sonality.
This year Miss Colton wi
the Judiciary Council of the
in chosing those who will be
with the positions. Former
Colton chose the assistants
but since the work is now co
a League activity, the Cou
chose the 23 girls who will
the next school year.
The duties of the assistants
living in Jordan Hall with1
freshman women, taking o
work of orientation advise
Orientation Week is over-
helping to orient the girls to
life and customs-acting as a
information bureau on all qi
starting them in extracurric
tivities they may be intere
and keeping them interested
tures, Choral Union, plays
forth.
The "advisers" will ea
charge of approximately 10
will come back to school'early
them and to help entertai
during the first week.
Both independent womenx
ority 'women (who will also
Jordan Hall during, the ye
eligible. Interviewing by J
Council will take place dur
week of Feb. 15.

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The only Drawing Pencil with a Microtomic Lead
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A

je Rackham Memor
ins
led per-
ll assist
League
honored
ly Miss
herself
nsidered
ncil will
serve in
sinclude
the new
ver the
rs after
-that is,
campus
general
uestions,
ular ac-
stdin,' The Blackouts
Sin lec-Th U l
and so
ch take Not Bombings,
to meet Dill Londoners
n them
and sor- Morrison Claims Traffic
live in
ar) are Control May Prevent1
'udiciary Similar Tragedies Here.,
ring the
Declaring that ordinary civilian
traffic problems increase tremen-
dously in .a country at war, Prof.
Roger L. Morrison of the transporta-
tion engineering department yester-
day revealed that more Londoners4
have been killed and injured by1
blackout traffic accidents than byf
bombing.
Professor Morrison, who recently7
opened a defense traffic control1
course in Flint, said that by a study
of blackout problems in England and
careful planning, similar tragedies
can be prevented in America.
Education of the public as to traf-
fic restrictions and special blackout
- problems is the most worthwhile
preparation we can make, he stated.
Fully as important but not so spec-
tacular, Professor Morrison added,
are the traffic problems connected
with congested areas around defense
factories, and troop movements. He
cited as an example the Ford bomber
plant at Ypsilanti.1
"Congestion around the plant hasa
caused several serious accidents al-
ready," he said, "and traffic engi-1
neers are now at work on a project
designed to clear the area."
Professor Morrison also disclosed1
that his traffic control course will
deal not only with defense problems
but also with general traffic condi-
tions. "It is all too easy," he said,
"to let an emergency situation blind
us to the often equally important
problems which are always with us."
In order to partly counteract this
difficulty, Professor Morrison has'
translated last year's traffic acci-
dent quota into the terms of the day.
"Taking only the young men of mili-
tary age, 18-44," he said, "enough
were killed and injured last year to
make up 48 armed divisions."
Ann Arbor Inventor
Gets Claim Reduced
LANSING, Jan. 27.-(P)-A claim
of $13,500,000 sought by Charles S.
Abbott of Ann Arbor in a suit against
the state on contention he is owed
the sum as inventor of a process now
used in Michigan for manufacture
of automobile license plates today
was reduced to $1,500,000 by the
State Court of Claims.
The court disallowed part of Ab-
bott's original petition, denying his
right to sue for damages beyond the
past three years which is the statute

of limitations in the court of claims.
The court permitted Abbott to
amend his petition to specify in de-
tail persons with whom he claims
he made an agreement for use of the
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Van Wagoner
Will Dedicate
New_ Building
(Continued from Page 1)
possible by gifts by the Horace H.-
Rackham and Mary A. Rackham
Fund, and by Mary A. Rackham.
The two wings of the building,
owned separately by the University
and the Engineering Society, flank a
central section which contains an
auditorium with a seating capacity
of 1,000 and a large banquet hall,
both of which will be available to
either institution.
The University wing houses 21 class i
rooms, capable of accommodating ap-
proximately 1,000 students at one
time, as well as special facilities for
radio and speech courses, science,
mathematics, engineering, and social
science. A spacious library of 84,000
volumes is also found in the Univer-
sity wing, and will operate as a
branch of the University general li-
brary.
Newconlb Accepts
Washington Post'
Having been on the Michigan cam-
pus for only four months, Prof. Theo-
dore M. Newcomb of the sociology
department will leave for Washing-
ton on January 28 for official busi-
ness.
In view of present world condi-
tions, Professor Newcomb felt it his
duty to accept a position offered to
him by the Foreign Broadcast Moni-
toring Service of the Federal Com-
munications Committee. His job will
be that of analyzing enemy propa-
ganda.
Radio operators will be assigned
the task of recording and translating
foreign broadcasts which will then
be presented to this committee of
seven for analysis. Professor New-
comb will be one of the seven men
working on the project.
Last Times Today
au
BGA:RRYM O RE
L UP E VE LE Z
GINNY SMMS
NMAY RBSON e PATSYELLY
PETER LIN PAES
and KAY KSER'S BAN fcarh1$ 9Hari Babbitt
ish Kabibble SuIly Mason * Produced
and Dircted b. DIAVID ITL
Starts Thursday
Here's to her
glorious beauty
eit'nl go to
your heart!

Gloria f
Productions MA
Presents \1t~~
;.:::.... :

)edicated Today
Tire Rationing
Plans Released
State Sales To Priorities
Announced For March 1
LANSING, Jan. 27.-(,)-Retread-
ed and recapped automobile tires will
be placed on ration "about the first
of March," Clarence Doyle, executive
secretary of the State Tire Rationing
Office, said today.
He said the federal government has
instructed state rationing officials to
prepare for sale of reconditioned
tires on a priority basis, giving pre-
ferential rating to persons in defense
work who must rely upon automobiles
to travel to their jobs.
Formal rationing order is expected
from Washington about Feb. 15, and
the following two weeks will be re-
quired to set up rationing procedures,
he said. A

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iv/
JOAN
FONTAINE N

Starting

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Master Director of Suspense-Romance who ade
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J-Hop Tickets Still Available
Will Sell to First-Comers
Until Supply Is Exhausted
IA nl fIfilLIc MEnE

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