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January 23, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE Ai T('TTTA N D A TI -

rD.InAV IAVTT:,'PV *-I I&A*

1 as1 1.9 . XX 1 1%I ,1-V

Jtf L!A t 4a, I4AA

Roth Quartet Director Renews
Old Acquaintances At Festival

i recounts: "Back in 1927 in Par-is, I
played the first piece of chamber
music that Roy Harris ever wrote;
and we have been fighting and work-
ing with each other ever since."
Here Harris interjected mildly,
r "Only during rehearsals of course."
"Oh, of course," continued Roth.
"One day we leave thinking that the
other fellow is the worst string quar-
tet and composer-next day we are
old friends again. All the time."
I Harris, whose "Four Preludes and
- Fugues" the Roth Quartet will play
- tomorrow, smiled wryly as Roth con-
tinued.'
"I did not know Roy was going to
be here; I send him a telegram in
New York for -him to come. Then I
find he is already here for something
else. But it's too late to get my
83 cents back by then!"
Spending as much as 80 per cent
of their concert time playing for stu-
dent audiences, the Roth Quartet
members are well able to judge Ann
Arbor audiences. Oliver Edel, cellist,
declared that students are more in-
terested and more responsive to
chamber music than the average city
audience.
The quartet has been on tour at
different universities since October;
at present they are on tour through
the mid-west and they will continue
until March, at which time they will
be back East.1
After the interview, Roth and
Harris left together to go out for the
evening. When last seen, they were
headed for either a movie or a well-
known local tavern.
NROTC Rifle Team
Wins OverVirginia
Boasting a record of five wins and
no losses, the NROTC rifle team took
its fifth victory of the current year
over an NROTC squad from the Uni-
versity of Virginia in a recent postal
match.#
Paced by Mort Hunter, who fired
the highest score of the season, the
NROTC squad had no trouble in
beating Virginia. The team is cap-
tained by Art Thomson, '44E, and
coached by Lieut. K. S. Shook, U.S.N.
Previous victims to the marksman-
ship of the Navy's riflemen were
NROTC teams from Yale, Renssel-
aer, Marquette and South Carolina.
Dr. Peet To Speak Today
Dr. Max Minor Peet, Professor of
Surgery, will discuss poliomyelitis at
10:45 p.m. today over WJR, on behalf
of the current infantile paralysis
drive.

New Courses
Will Be Given
in Languages
University Will Augment
Present Work OfferedI
In Russian,_Japanese
Changes in the projected courses
in Japanese, Russian and astronomy
for next semester have been announ-
ced by the office of Assistant Dean
L. S. Woodburne of the literary col-
lege.
In addition to the intensive course
in Japanese conversation and trans-
lation for eight hours credit, there
will be offered for five hours credit
a course in exclusively conversational
Japanese. The eight hour course will
meet three times a day, four days a
week, and the five hour course twice
a day, four days a week.
In Russian, besides the previously
announced courses, a beginning
course for three hours credit will be
conducted by Mme. Pargment.
In the astronomy department,I
courses 51, 154 and 156 will not beI
offered the second semester this year.
Also section one of Astronomy 32 hasj
been dropped.
Civic Orchestra, Dance
Group Will Give Ballet
A local dance studio and the Ann
Arbor Civic orchestra are cooperating
to present "An Evening of Ballet" at
8 p.m. today and tomorrow in the
city high school auditorium.
Chopiniana, a special suite of Cho-
pin compositions, will be featured in
the program which includes nearly
30 dances as well as several orches-
tra selections.

iedica Group
To Give Relief
fitEinergeiacey
The Medical Advisory Council for
Civilian Defense, headed by Dr. War-
ren E. Forsythe, director of Health
Service, held its first meeting at the
Service yesterday and made plans for
coordinating Washtenaw County
emergency medical relief services.
The recently formed medical coun-
cil is a branch of the Washtenaw
County Council of Defense and will
have overall authority in directing
disaster relief in the event of sabo-
tage or aerial bombing of defense
plants, or other war emergencies.
First move of the medical council
was to divide the more densely pop-
ulated parts of the county into smal-
ler areas with a member of the de-
fense council as local head. These
areas are centered around Ann Ar-
bor, Ypsilanti, Dexter, Saline, Chel-
sea, Milan and Manchester.
rTypioid Will Not.
Affect U.S. Army
The deadly typhus plague now dec-
imating the Nazi and Soviet armies
in the Russian campaign and re-
ported spreading to North Africa is
not likely to infect American Army
camps according to Dr. Warren E.
Forsythe, director of Health Service.
The typhus, highly fatal blood dis-
ease, is spread by lice biting soldiers
in the field who are living under rel-
atively unsanitary conditions, espec-
ially lacking changes of clothing.
Since the carier lice breed in con-
ditions of filth, it is unlikely that
civilian areas not in the war area
will be hit by the scourge.

A bill of four one-act plays, each
directed by a student in Valentine B.
Windt's advanced directing class, will
be presented at 7:30 p.m. Monday in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Although the productions are un-
der the general supervision of Vir-
ginia Whitworth who is on the Play
Production staff, all the work-act-
ing, directing, costuming and scene-
building-is done by students.
Margaret Cotton, '42, will direct
pastoral scenes from "As You Like
It" by William Shakespeare; Joseph
Lynn, '42, will direct a comedy; Fay
Goldner, '42, will direct a play writ-
ten by herself entitled "As Darkness
Calls," and Theodore Balgooyen,
Grad., will direct his own "Black
Land, Bright Sky."
The last of the plays Balgooyen is
directing with certain techniques of
Russian directors he has studied, not-
ably Meierhold. According to Meier-
hold's theory, the characters in plays
are symbolic and it is his idea, one
which Thornton Wilder has followed,
that the audience should be included
in the play rather than watching it
from the outside.
Students in Robert Mellencamp's
Victory Campaign
To Cogllect F ooks
For Enlisted Men
A national goal of 10,000,000 books
has been set for the Victory Book
Campaign soon to be inaugurated in
Ann Arbor and on campus.
Primary purpose of the campaign
is to furnish reading material for
army, navy, and marine camps, whose
libraries are inadequate for the in-
flux of armed forces.
A secondary aim of the movementC
is to supplement the libraries in;
crowded industrial centers, and child-
ren's books, household books and text
books for this purpose are being
sought along with the novels, his-
tories and technical works suitable
for service men.
The local drive will begin the week
of Feb. 12, and collections will be
made in various spots around cam-
pus Thursday, Friday and Saturday
of that week. Students are urged to
go over their books now, so that they
will be prepared to donate at that
time.
All money contributed, as well as
money derived from sale of rare or
unwanted books, will be put into the
general fund for the purchase of
more books.
MPA To Hold Convention
EAST LANISING.-OP-The 67th
annual convention of the Michigan
Press Association, its theme "War
and the Press," will open here today
with an expected attendance of 200
newspaper publishers and advertis-
ing executives.

Student-Directed One-Act Plays
Will Be Presented Here Monday

advanced stagecraft class are build-
ing the sets for the plays under his
general supervision. Balgooyen is de-
signing his own set, Helene Herz-
fels, '42, is working on Lynn's play,
Willis Pitts, Grad., is art director of
"As You Like It" and Gordon Bird,
'42A, is working on "As Darkness
Calls."
Students in Play Production and
Speech 190-the teaching of speech-
will meet with members of the staff
later in the evening for an informal
clinical discussion of the presenta-
tions.
No tickets are required for admit-
tance to the performance, and the
general public is invited.
Engine School
Technic Sale
CosesToday
Students in the College of Engi-
neering will have a final chance to
secure the January defense issue of
The Michigan Technic when the
monthly magazine concludes its two-
day sale today.
Articles in this issue include
"World's Largest Bomber Plant" by
Keith L. Smith, '43E, "Revolution in
Artillery" by Col. H. W. Miller of the
engineering drawing department and
"Miracle in Concrete" by William 0.
Jacobs, '44E.
The story behind the work of Gun-
ther Kessler, glass-blower of all the
intricate shapes and forms used in
physical and chemical research work,
will be featured in the regular Tech-
nic department, "The Technic Ram-
bles."
In a second Technic department,
"The Technic Presents ...." will ap-
pear sketches of Lieut. Col. H. W. D.
Riley of the military science depart-
m ent, Henry "Hank" Fielding, '42E,
and Robert "Bud" Keetch, '42E.
Copies of the December issue will
be on hand for those who neglected
to obtain them before vacation, the
editors have announced. Sales points
will be over the engineering Arch, in
front of the secretary's office, West
Engineering Building, and in the
lobby of the East Engineering Build-

'Sage Of Possum Poke'
R'ees 8nd. Hiiehday
SAULTE STE. MARIE. Jan. 22.-
R)--Letters and telegrams of con-
gratulations from friends in all walks
of life poured in on the "Sage of
Possum Poke," former Governor
Chase S. Osborn, who today attained
his 82nd birthday.
Y)
give y~our room
the "Oxford accent"
The Oxford by Aunley
accents your room with its
beauty-your reeords with
its brilliant tone.
Shown above: Oxford 8-tube
automatic combination with
short wave and standard broad-
cast. Genuine Mahogany. A twin
to the Oxford is available as a
record cabinet.
205 F. Liberty St. Phone 3675

CLASSIFIED9 AnvERTISINtl

CLASSIFIED
A DVERTISING
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assist you in.
composing your ad. Stop at the
Michigan Daily Business Of-
fice, 420 Maynard Street.

at 2--4-7-9 P.M.

-A

FOR RENT
APPROVED HOUSE for men. Dou-
ble room. Near campus. Available
2nd semester. 535 Walnut Street.
219c
COSY SINGLE ROOM, large closet,
excellent location, quiet for study.
1320 Forest Court. Phone 4685.
216c
FIRST FLOOR furnished apartment.
Teachers, graduate women, or stu-
dent couple. Inquire 422 E. Wash-
ington. 212c
SINGLE ROOM for girl, second
semester. 2114 floor. Very warm.
Close to campus. 515 Walnut.
Phone 3301. 217c
GRAD WOMEN-Single rooms, well
furnished, cross ventilation, show-
er, lovely for spring. Phone 6152
afternoons. 202c
BEAUTY SHOPS
PERMANENTS, $3.00-$7.00. Sham-
poo and set, 65c all week. Gingham
Girl Beauty Shop, 302 S. State.
Phone 2-4000.
LOST and FOUND
LOST-New leather brief case, ini-
tials J. E. L. Outside contained
books and manuscripts. Cash re-
ward. Call 5486. 215c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY- 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
FOR SALE
RADIO-VICTROLA combination. In
excellent condition. Phone 2-5671.
220c
KING Liberty Model Trumpet-Gold
and silver finish-excellent condi-
tion-price reasonable-Phone B.
Kinskern-300 Tyler House. 214c

PREPARE
FOR CIVIL SERVICE
ARMY SERVICE
DEFENSE WORK
Secretarial Classes now forming
Hamilton Business College
27th Year William at State

You've got a date with danger...
a rendezvous with romance..-
on...

r aturin; < :t
Robert Preston .OlenDrew
Nils Asther- Margaret Hayes
Clarence Kolb'- Alice White
Directed by WIiam Clemn
Produced on the'New York stagp by A. I Wardsp

TYPING
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
90c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
EXPERT TYPING. Term papers,
theses. Accuracy guaranteed. Rea-
sonable. Call Mrs. Eley or Mrs.
Walsh. 2-4108. 201c
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c

Extra Added
Carioca Candy
Serenade Kid

5

World
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