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January 21, 1942 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-01-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN IAILY om

~DAY,3ANITRV 21m1om

Morize, Celebrated Frenchman,
Will Address Cercle Tomorrow

Qt I

",G eL iifta lu2 tions made during his stay in his na-
enchmen in America will address tive country at that time. From the
mbers of the Cercle Francais and beginning of the war until the capit-
erested students and faculty mem- ulation of France he served as direc-
tor of the cabinet at the Commissar-
s at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow when iat a l'Information, whose duty it was
of. Andre Morize of Harvard Uni- , to formulate propaganda and coun-
sity and Middlebury College will ter-propaganda to further the French
ak in the Rackham Amphitheatre cause. In this capacity he' worked
"La Reconstruction de la France under Jean Giraudoux, one of the
res 1871." best known of contemporary French
the lecture, originally scheduled to dramatists.
given yesterday, will be in French, A former fellow at 'Ecole Normale
d admission will be by ticket only. Superieure in Paris, Morize was prior
ese tickets, which entitle their to the last war a professor at Johns
ders to admission to all lectures Hopkins University. In 1914 he en-
nsored by the Cercle Francais, listed with the French army in which
y be purchased from the secretary he was promoted successively to ser-
the romance languages depart- geant, lieutenant and captain. Upon
nt, Room 112, Romance Langua- his return in 1917 he took up his
Building, or at the door prior to present position as professor of
talk. French literature at Harvard, and
lecognized as an authority on since 1926 he has been director of the
nch thought, Professor Morize re- Middlebury French Summer School
tly published a new book, France: in Middlebury, Vt., the outstanding
1940, concerned with observa- French summer school in America.
LASSIFIED ADVERTISING

MISCELLANEOUS

Technic' Sale
Is Scheduled
TomlUorriow
Disaster overtook The Michigan
Technic yesterday when it became
apparent that mechanical difficulties
would delay publication for the sec-
ond successive month, and that the
January issue would not go on sale
until tomorrow.
But it will still be the information-
packed issue which was scheduled to
appear today, the editors promise.
Substantiating that claim, the ar-
ticles in this issue include a revala-
tory tribute to that engineering feat
called Gand Coulee Dam entitled
"Miracle in Concrete," by William O.
Jacobs, '44E.
Other articles in this issue will be
"World's Largest Bomber Plant," by
Keith L. Smith, '43E, and "Revolu-
tion in Artillery," by Col. H. W. Mil-
ler of the engineering drawing de-
partment.
Introduced to the College of En-
gineering in this issue will be Lieut.
Col. H. W. D. Riley of the military
science department, Robert "Bud"
Keetch, '42E, and Henry "Hank"
Fielding, '42E, all being presented
through the regular Technic feature,
"The Technic Presents ..."
The newest of the Technic fea-
tures, "The Technic Rambles," will
this month present the inside story of
Gunther Kessler, glass-blower of all
the intricate equipment used by Uni-
versity chemists and physicists in
their research work.
This issue will be sold over the en-
gineering Arch, in front of the sec-
retary's office, West Enginering
Building, and in the lobby of the
East Engineering Building. Decem-
ber issues will also be available for
those who neglected to obtain them
before vacation.
Student Volunteers
Should Get Health
ServiceCheck-UPs
Students seriously considering en-
listing in any of the volunteer mili-
tary services are urged to get a phys-
ical check-up at 4Iealth Service be-
fore making a trip to an out-of-town
recruiting station.
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director
of Health Service, said that the
Service staff 4as anxious to give ad-
vice to those considering enlistment
with a view to saving students un-
necessary traveling expense by deter-
mining any defects.
Selective Service standards have
been so liberalized recently that al-
most anyone who does not have an
incapacitating physical defect will
be accepted and Health Service is
not particularly interested in con-
ducting examinations of this type.
II I

P OCTU'RE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

-

A N S W E R C A L L F O R N U R S E S-Lieut. Col. Miner F. Felch and First Lieut. Mary G. Phillips, chief nurse, head parade of
nurses at Fort Devens, Mass., station hospital. These women between the ages of 21 and 40 responded to the U.S. Army call for nurses.

NE WS

MIMEOGRAPHING -- Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 70

BEAUTY SHOPS

PERMANENTS, $3.00-$7.00. Sham-
poo and set, 65c all week. Gingham
Girl Beauty Shop, 302 S. State.
Phone 2-4000.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Tuxedo, full dress suit,
overcoat and topcoat. Seldom used;
good condition. Call 2-4138 after
9 p.m.
KING Liberty Model Trumpet-Gold
and silver finish-excellent condi-
tion-price reasonable-Phone B.
Kinskern-300 Tyler House. 214c
TYPING
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
90ec
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6927. 706 Oakland.
EXPERT TYPING. Term papers,
theses. Accuracy guaranteed. Rea-
sonable. Call Mrs. Eley or Mrs.
Walsh. 2-4108. 201c

H A W A 1--Lieut. Gen. Delos
C. Emmons (above), commander
of the Hawaiian department,
looks less than his 53 years.
A West Pointer, he's been train-
ing for warfare since 1917.

W i N G S F 0 R C U B A N A I R M E N-Col. Fulgencio Batista, president of Cuba, congratulates
a Cuban air cadet, one of .27 newly awarded their "wings" at Havana after finishing courses in the
army aviation school. With Batista appear (left) Col. Manuel Lopez Migoya, army chief, and (right)
Col. Julio Diez Arguellez, navy chief, and Col. Ignacio Galindez, chief army inspector.

f

the

e

priorities

D 1 P L O'M A T-Brainy Moe
Berg, the Boston Red Sox
catcher and coach who also
knows nine languages, will visit
Central and South America on a
governmental good will tour.

W I N T E R B O OK F A V O R I T E-With the $40,009 Hambletonian stake set for Aug. 12 at
Goshen, N. Y., Colby Hanover emerges in (he 1942 winter book as odds-on favorite for the trotting
derby. The horse, shown with his trainer-driver, Fred Egan, was recently bought for $15,000 by C. W.
Phellis of Greenwich, Conn., and I. W. Gleason of Williamsport, Pa., from the Eugene Frey estate.

Garg-oil
avalabl

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January

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