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January 07, 1942 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH E MICHIGA.N DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 1942

W _. . . - _. ..-_ _ .-.. - -. . n_ _ _ ._ . ...__-__--_

Jap Language
To Be Taught
By Yamagiwa
Beginning Course To Train
Interpreters For Work
In Government Service
Eight Hours Credit
In response to the great demand
for competent translators of Japa-
nese, Joseph K. Yamagiwa of the
Oriental Languages department will
offer next semester an intensive
course in beginning Japanese.
At the end of this first semester,
students should be able to meet at
leastdminimum requirements for work
as interpreteais and translators.
The course, for which eight hours'
credit will be given, will begin with a
careful study of grammar, and will
end up with the reading of undoc-
tored modern Japanese newspapers,
magazines, and scholarly works.
During the semester the student
will be expected to become familiar
with some 1,800 of the 15,000 Japa-
nese characters, to become competent
in the ordinary forms of discourse,
and to learn the effective use of dic-
tionaries, encyclopeias, and other
research volumes.
The class, which will be limited to
10 or 12 members, will meet four'
times a week for two hour periods,
and will also partake in drill periods
during which the students will hear
Japanese rccords.
The course will be repeated during
the summer sessions, and it is highly
pr9bable that a continuation of the
beginning course will also be held.
An organization meeting for pros-
pective studefts will be held next
week, at which time Mr. Yamagiwa
will give a more detailed account of
the program.
Dean Edmonson To 1eet
With LeadingEducators
Dean James B.i Edmonson of the
education school will leave for New
York today (Wed.) to attend a three-
day meeting of the Educational Pol-
icies Commission beginning Friday.
The Commission, a representative
group of leading American educators
whose purpose is to influence and
point the way for improvement of
the nation's educational policies, will
discuss vital educational problems
caused by the war.
CLASSIFIED
DIBJI CTOrr
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Non-Contract
$ 40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.)
Contract Rates oi lRequest,
'Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assist you ini
composing your ad. Stop at the
Michigan Daily Business Of-
fice, 420 Maynard Street.

G ~ S
7 WTANTED TO BUY
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736.Pc
WANTED TO RENT
UPPERCLASSMAN seeking solitude
wants small bachelor's apartment
with kitchenette. For one or two.
Can occupy any time up to end of
semester. Box 5, Michigan Daily.
TYPING
TYPING: L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 '8. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
94c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING -- Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c
LAUNDERING -
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
ECAD CAI 9

Teld By F I

Miketife
- MIKEMEN ANSWER
0 CALL TO COLORS
By BERYL SHOENFIELD
Radio stations throughout the
country are being forced to cede
mikemen of draft age to the na-
tional emergency, among them many
Michigan trained broadcasters.
Ward Quaal, president of Men's
Judiciary Council in 1941, and re-
cently employed by Chicago's WGN,
has just exchanged his job on the
air for one of defense, as has George
Shephard, who has been "punching
commercials" for WMFF, in Platts-
burg, N. Y.
Pete Antonelli (radio's Peter Arnel)
who received his mike experience on
the campus, quits his job with the
Beckley, W. Va. radio station for the
service, and golden-voiced Dick
Slade, one year with FM station
W45D as "special events" announcer,
expects to leave any day now.
Mimes fans will remember Jack
Silcott's hilariously authentic inter-
pretation of Mrs. Roosevelt. Silcott,
prominent in play production and
chairman of the Union Opera ve-
hicle "Take A Number," and of late
director of radio in the Fram. Cor-
poration, Rhode Island, also ex-
changes mike for might. Similarly
Donn Chown, ex-student band man-
ager, has trader WJR for Fort Cus-
ter associations. And Ted Grace,
former Morris Hall ace, has also been
inducted.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PIOCT~URE

N E W S V N

Glenn C. Kline, 31, (left) sten-
ographer in a Detroit, Mich., ticket
office, was in custody of United
States Deputy Marshal Adam
Niecekowski (right) after Kline
was arrested by FBI agents and
charged with failure to register
under the selective service act.
John Bugas, in charge of the De-
troit FBI office, said evidence of
subversive activity would be placed
before federal grand jury. Kline, a
native of Swartz Creek, Mich., was
active in the Silver Shirts, an anti-
semitic organization, Burgas said.

OL ONGA PO
NAVAL
STATION
MONTALBAN
AAN
~/
BA LANG A
YADMana MANILA
BAG A C FO... RT
CAVIT E,.M SK IN LE Y
F2ORT ~~ NAVY
M IL LS YA R D N IH OL
HUGHES
COR REGIDOR L
FORT *IDRUM BINAN
F RA NK~:
C A LAMBA J
0 10 2
M IL ES, LOS BANOS
The Japanese found Corregidor island forts (1) a hard nut to crack on their first attempts, and were
reported massing to storm it and Batan Peninsula (2). In Washington it was believed the Navy had shifted
from Cavite to Olongapo (3). Tokyo reported intensive air bombing of troops withdrawing northward from
Manila.

Modern Language Association
Program Features Ham, Job in

Lt. Gen. Sir Henry Pownall
(above) has succeededAiroChief
Marshal Sir Robert-Popham as
commander of the British forces
in the Far East.

French Professors Speak
At National Convention
Held During Vacation
Two University of Michigan pro-
fessors, Edward B. Ham and Antoine
J. Jobin, both of the Department of
Romance Languages, were featured
on the program of the annual con-
vention of the Modern Language As-
sociation of America, held Dec. 29
to 31. in Indianapolis.
As chairman of the newly organ-
ized committee on North American
French, Professor Ham described a
score of specific projects he said
should engage the attention of schol-
ars immediately. Professor Jobin's
talk concerned itself with one of the
most important literary crises 'in
French Canada, the current conflict
between strictly regionalist writers
and those who seek to widen the hor-
izon of Canadian letters.
Recognized as early as 1887 as an
indispensable field for research, North
American French was finally given a
place in the convention programs this
year primarily through the efforts of
Prof. Marine Leland of Smith Col-
lege and Professor Ham. On the first
day of the meeting a special pro-
gram of Iapers and discussion was
devoted primarily to the literature of
French Canada. Future programs
will widen their scope to give fuller
representation to French culture in
Louisiana and the Antilles.
participating in the -pro ram were
speakers from Quebec, Fench New
England and France. Prime Minister
Adelard Godbout of the Province of
Quebec, in a message to the group,
indicated the contribution which the
Modern Language Association can
make toward the betterment of in-
ternational relations between this
FDR Outlines
Wal lProgram",
Agtraitst Axis
(___ tined from rage _)
quest" over half a century, said a
similar "policy of criminal conquest
was adopted later by Italy," but that
neither matched the "gargantuan as-
pirations of Hitler and his Nazis."
All three had been merged, he added,
into one single plan.
Under this scheme, Japans' role
was to divert to the Pacific Ameri-
can-made weapons which otherwise
woud go to the British.,
"The act of Japan at Pearl Harbor
was intended to stun us," he con-
tinued, "to terrify us to such an ex-
tent that we would divert our indus-
trial and military strength to the
Pacific area or even to our own con-
tinental defense.
"The plan has failed in its purpose.
We have not been stunned. We have
not been terrified or confused."
But, nevertheless, hard choices had
to be made.
"It was bitter, for example, not
to be able to relieve the heroic and
historic defenders of Wake Island.
It was bitter for us not to be able
to land'a million men and a thous-
and ships in the Philippine Islands.
"But this adds only to our deter-
mination to see to it that the Stars
and Stripes will fly again over Wake
and Guam; yes, to see to it that the
brave people of the Philippines will
be rid of Japanese imperialism; and
wil live in freedom. security and in-

country and the French-speaking
peoples of North America.I
In his talk Professor Jobin stressed
the evidence of a literary evolution in
French Canada as especially con-
spicuous in the novel. The problem
confronting authors today, he stated,
is that of redefining the tradition of
the "useful novel." Novelists and
poets alike, he said, are still inclined
to turn their backs on modern pro-
gress as such, particularly as repre-
sented in the less desirable aspects of
American civilization.
Leading French-Canadians, how-
ever. recognize that their problem is
psychologic as well as economic and
that their position in the world must
eventually cease to be one of mere
defense. It is consequently probable,
Professor Jobin pointed out, that
their literature and thought will sub-
stantially widen in scope and that
literature of the soil will be supple-
mented by works based on urban life
and the treatment of many themes
as yet untouched.
Alietn Prog ranm
To Be Offered
Courses Will Be Prepared
By Extension Service
Aliens and teachers of aliens
throughout the United States are
soon to receive citizenship courses
and lesson materials from the Uni-
versity Extension Service.
Although Michigan is the first
university to receive this assignment
from the national Citizenship Edu-
cation Program, it is expected that
after the extension service here in-
itiates the plan, other schools and
colleges will also be asked to con-
tribute their facilities.
Dr. Fred G. Stevenson is to direct
tihe local program, which will consist
of preparing and distributingboth
correspondence lessons for use by in-
dividual aliens and teaching aids for
persons engaged in adult citizenship
education work.
Under the sponsorship of the WPA,
the Department of Justice, the U. S.
Office of Education and the State
Superintendent of Public Instruction,
the work will be supported by the
federal government on a $28,000 a
year basis.
Full support for the program will
come from the state and regional
WPA offices. These offices consider
the assignment a recognition of the
effective work done in the field of
adult.education in this area.
Professor Rome
Chosen tTo Serve
Ont Defense IBoard
Prof. Kenneth T. Rowe of the De-
partment of English was named to
the defense committee created by
the American Educational Theatre
Association at their annual conven-
tion held during the holidays, in
Detroit.
Other members of the committee
include the chairman, Prof. James
Parke, chairman of the drama de-
partment at the University of Texas'
and newly elected president of the
A. E. T. A., and Prof. Hunton D. Sell-
man of the University of Iowa.
Professor Rowe will represent the
playwriting aspects of the pro-
gram, and Professor Selman will!

The Fort Custer, Mich., "News" army post newspaper, labeled this
"Custer's Military Advisor Alonzo." Caught in a frenzy of work he glibly
assists Washington military experts via the long distance phone on a
stiff technical problem." Alonzo, a columnist who gave "advice to sol-
diers," disappeared from print the week after this was published.

Jack Snethen of near Des Moines, Ia., managed to break through
snow drifts with a horse and sled in, 24 degree below zero weather to
take milk to the roadside after the New Year's day blizzard had halted
traffic for two days. This picture was taken on a, farm near Des Moines,
where 24 inches of snow fell in 24 hours.

Clarence Budington Kelland ," :::::." "**. Y"""..';........* .. :".. .:::::*:.*** ***
(above) has been named executive The Navy said that the U.S.S. Heron (above), small seaplane tender, was damaged by a direct bomb hit
and publicity director of the Re- during a seven-hour attack, but destroyed one four-en gined flying boat and badly damaged at least one
publican National Committee. other. The ship then reached port safely in the Far East.

/

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