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September 30, 1941 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

Despite Lack Of Stude
Life Went On In Ann,

ant s ,
Arbor
M onths

Throug hvacation

--- -

Highlights Of Summer
Included 'Time Bomb'
Scare, Crazy Weather
Heart Ailment Fatal
To Chief Of Police
By EUGENE MANDEBERG
Despite the fact that the vast ma-
jority of University students left Ann
Arbor for the summer, the town
went right on existing, and many
events of local interest took place
during the summer vacation.
Generally, the city maintained its
enviable reputation for peace and
quiet, and crimes of every descrip-
tion were scarce and minor. Most
complaints of that nature were for
petty larceny and similar misde-
meanors.
The sheriff's office, however, re-
ported a large number of automo-
bile accidents in the county, most of
them occtrring on country roads.
Although only a small number of
fatalities were reported, the num-
ber 'of injured persons was high for
the two months period.
Fatalities From Drownings
Most of the other fatalities in the
county during the summer were
drownings, many of which happened
during the July 4 weekend..
The latter part of June was high-,
lighted gy the County Board of Sup-
ervisors' vote to establish a health,
unit for.the county to continue until
Oct. 1 of this year. At that time,
when the new fiscal year begins, the
health unit wil be examined as to
its expediency and the decision will
be made as to whether to continue it
or let the matter drop.
Highly satisfactory to city officials
was the subscription to the Unit-
ed Service Organizations' cam-
paign which netted $7,000. Since the
city's quota. was $5,500, the remain-
ing funds were applied towards - the
city's relief organizations.
'100 Years-And Beards'
July opened with the Dexter Cen-
tennial celebtation, a three day af-
fair over the July 4 weekend. - The
town's citizensedressed in the fva-
shions :of a century ago and every
male grew a beard for the festivities.
High point of the celebration was
the arrival of a replica of the first
train ever to enter Dexter just 100
years ago, July 4, 1841. The train,
borrowed from Greenfield Village,
chugged into the station bn the back
of a flatcar.
Less cheerful news was also an-
nounced early in July with the death
of Police Chief Norman E. Cook, 42,
from a heart ailment. Chief Cook
had been the head of the Ann Arbor

force for two years and was a mem-
ber of the department since 1923.
Sherman H. Mortenson was ap-
oointed the new chief of police. He
had been second in command under
Cook, and claimed the distinction of
being the first officer to operate a
scout car in the city.
July also found city relief rolls at
i record low. Officials attributed
the sharp decline to added old age
assistance, better -hospitalization fa-
cilities, and national defense em-
ployment..
Middle July recorded the only
death among the summer session stu-
dents, when Felipe 0. Larrazabel, 27,
of Caracos, Venezuela died of in-
juries suffered in an automobile ac-
cident.
For Fire College-A Fire
Oddest coincidence of the summer
convention seasoni was the fire at a
downtown restaurant while the an-
nual Fire College was in session here.
Members of the convention turned'
out en masse to watch the local fire
department do its work.
Another city record was shattered
that month when 120 aliens in the
county sought naturalization papers.
It was the largest number to seek
citizenship in one month in the his-
tory of the county.
The Ann Arbor police force proved
its worth by winning five medals in
the annual pistol shooting meet here,
thus maintaining its fine record for
marksmanship which it has held for
several years.
Time Bomb Scare
Biggest scare of the summer was
the discovery of what was thought
to be a time bomb near an industrial
plant in the city. The "bomb" was
rushed to Lansing for an ex-ray ex-
amination, but it turned out to be
merely a cardboard cylinder with
cement in the center and a fuse at
one end.
Answering the national call for
aluminum, Ann Arbor citizens gave
with a will and filled the bin in
front'of the county courthouse to
overflowing.
In the. realm of local sports, Dick
PARKER PRODUCTS
Sold at
0. D. Morrill,
314 South State St.
Headquarters for
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
If You Write, We Have It

I

ROTC Rifle Team
Plan's Year's Activity
Marksmen of the ROTC who wish
to compete on the rifle team are
urged to attend an organizational
meeting at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct.
8, at ROTC Headquarters.
Four teams are planned for the
coming year's activity, which .will
include matches with other ROTC
teams in the Big' Ten as well as
with non-conference squads. - The
team will also enter the Hearst Tro-
phy matches in the spring.
+Ohlinger, 12, of Ypsilanti .won the
local Soap Box Derby, but the lad
was eliminated in the Akron finals
when his car was damaged in the
first heat.
Defense Stamps Sold
Defense saving stamps proved very
salable in town when 5,008 were sold
in a drive to aid national defense.
To the discomfort of hay fever
sufferers, a bumper crop of ragkeed
was reported in and around Ann
Arbor, but the sneezes failed to ma-
terialize, because the pollen count
remained mysteriously low.
Finally, the weather. It lived up
to its usual reputation, coming boil-
ing hot for most of July, but sud-
denly reversing itself in the latter
part of August to a series of chilly
winds that caught the population
completely by surprise. This sum-
mer, as always, the climate was as
changeable as a chameleon.
Ge e,
The Fo/kssure
wive me at lheylikelAee
niceion alttrs
Parker You'#/ write.
pen andpencil Besides it will
set ,be abighe/p
in your
c/askorf

. , , 1.

.--.
ti

. .............

/

1,:

1 1

t

Again

This

Year!

I I

Students will find that the EFFICIENT SERV-
ICE, EXPERT WORKMANSHIP, PLEASING
PRICES* offered-by the Ann Arbor laundries
constitute the best answer by far to students'

II

I

,I

ASK TO SEE THE PEN THAT
IS THE ALL-AMERICAN CHOICE
ON THE CAMPUS - THE PARKER
Pens' from $1.95- to $10.00
Sets from $2.95 'to $15.00
Look for Parker's Blue Diarn nd-
It Means Guaranteed for Life
FOKLLETT'S
BOOKSTORE

11

i

laundering problems.

III

'I -_-_ ii

${ ' /6*~(& e wajm , ~Don't Forget Your Parker!

* Notice the Value-Packed Ofer Below!

[

I(:. _________ _

t

SAMPLE

BUNDLE

I.

I

(1

3 Shirts
0
3 Pairs of Sox
6 Handkerchiefs

t

TELEVISfON

t
s

Finished
mended and
Buttons
Replaced
Returned
Dried and
Fluffed -
not Ironed.

Il

I,

2 Suits of Underwear

1 Pajama Suit
2 Bath Towels

,

w

Approximate Cost

... $1.10

I

A t

Jt-PuiYiVHBPen
-More Room for Ink because NO rubber sac, hence
a Pen that won't run dry in lectures, tests, exams!

11

I

GUARANTEED by LIFE CONTRACT
Toting books around won't get a
student anywhere if his pen runs
dry in the classroom. So took before
you leap to some problem pen. It
will only frustrate your I. Q. on
Test -day.
In college after college, coast to
coast, the Parker Vacumatic is
voted No. 1 by students because of
these modern features:

vacumet4
$8.75 and $12.75
Sets, Duofold,

5. Exclusive Style-streamlined, Pearl
and Jet RINGS.
Go and try it today at any near-
by pen counter. But use discretion
by looking for Parker's Blue Dia.
mond on the smart ARROW clip.
That's our Life Guarantee Contract.
Junior or Sub-deb, $5; Debutante
or Major, $8.75. Maxima, $10; Duo-
fold, $2.95 and $3.95. Pen and Pencil
Sets, $3.95, $5.00, $8.75 and up.
The Parker Pen Co. Janesvillet Wis.
COPR. 1941, THE PARKER PEN CO.
Varer

$3,45 and $5

1. Super-charged-with ink
to carry over.
2. One-Hand Sacless Filler
-easiest to operate.
3. Television Barre-shows
when to refill.
4. Lubricated Writing-
Non-brittle, 14 K Gold Point
tipped with oil-smooth Osmi-
ridium thatwon'twear scratchy
in a lifetime.

SACLESS FILLER
Easiest of all to oper-
ate-and most modern
SParker's Blue Diamond
on the pen is our Life
Contract uncondition-
ally guaranteeing to
service the pen for the
life of the owner except
Ffor loss and intentional
damage, subject only to
a 35c charge for post-
age, insurance, and
handling, provided comn-
plete pen is returned for
service.

VARSITY LAUNDRY
23-1-23
TROJAN LAUNDRY
and Dry Cleaning Company
9495

KYER LAUNDRY

4185-

II

WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY

and Dry Cleaning Company

4117

FitEt:Introductory bottle of Parker Quink- the quick-dry ink. Write Parker Quink, Department 1-41, Janesville, Wisconsin

It

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