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November 14, 1941 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1941-11-14

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THE C MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 14,

1941

A ir'tiitau at~

i

i

v

bed and managed by students of the University of
gan under the authority of'the Board in Control
udent Publications.
lished every morning except Monday during the
rsity year and Summer Session.
Member of the Associated Press
Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the
r republication of all news dispatches credited to
not otherwise credited in this newspaper. All
of republication of all other matters herein also
ed.
ered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
d class mail matter.,
scriptions during the regular school year by
$4.00, by mail $5.00.
REPREsBNT9 FOR NATIONAL ADVBRTI.NG BY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
, College Publishers Reresentatlve
420 MADIsON AVE. NEw YORK. N.Y.
rC04S@ - .BOSTON . Los ANGELES - SAN FlANcIsco
ber, Associated Collegiate Press, 1941.42

Edi
le oe16
In Dann
id Lachenlruch
McCormick
Wilson
hur Hill.
et Hiatt
ce Miller
:inia Mitchell

torial Sta f
. Managing Editor
. . . . Editorial Director
* . . .City Editor
* . . . Associate Editor
. . . . Sports Editor
. . Assistant Sports Editor
. . ^ . . Women's Editor
. . Assistant Women's Editor
. . . . Exchange Editor

Business" Staff

iel H. Huyett
es B. Collins
ise Carpenter
yn Wright

. .. . Business Manager
. Associate Business Manager
*Women's Advertising Manager
. Women's Business Manager

IGHT EDITOR: WILLIAM-A. MacLEOD
' he editorials published in The ,Michigan
)aily are written by members of The Daily
taff and represent the views of the writers
only. 1

o Attempted Dupe
i Aluminum Drive

N

.0

. 9

U NDER THE TITLE "The Aluminum
Drive Has Done Its Work" an edi-
rial by H. J. Slautterback appeared in these
lumns Tuesday, attacking the decent govern-
ental effort, to divert idle consumers' alumin--
n to. the aid of the defense- program.
The aluminum drive, Miss Slautterback says'
ad as its basis the "colossal lie" that used alum-
rm could be melted and recast into bombers.
ccording to two metallurgical engineers, whom
iss Slautterback interviewed, used aluminum
nnot be so melted and recast but can be con-
rted only into consumers' products. The Amer-
an public was duped, Miss Slautterback charges,
id "now there's the devil to pay." /
O ONE will contest Miss Slautterback's con-
tention that the teakettles and frying pans
1llected in the drive will never find their way in-
the fuselages and wings of bombers and fighter
aanes. In fact, Mayor LaGuardia, whom Miss
autterback describes as "publicity-wise, super-
lesman Mayor LaGuardia," who "put over" the
uminum drive, world be one of the first to
pree with her. In an address at LaGuardia
.eld July 16, five days prior to the opening
the drive, the mayor, as reported by The New
ork Times, " . . . explained that the Office
Production Management had asked the Of-
ce of Civilian Defense, which he directs, to
llect used, scrap, and obsolete aluminum all
er the country so that primary aluminum
uld be used for defense."
The purpose of the aluminum drive, there-
re, clearly was not to collect scrap aluminum
r direct use in aircraft production, but to re-
ase primary, aluminum ?ordinarily used in con-.
:mers products. According to Dr. Francis C.
rary, .director of the Aluminum Company of
merica's research laboratories, "The used alum-
uum utensils would serve very well for other
irposes, such as cast cylinder heads and pistons'
r automobiles and trucks." The' primary alum-
uum, thus released, can be used to expand air-
aft production. Every American housewife who
>nated a frying pan was indirectly building
)mbers for Britain and for defense.
ISS SLAUTTERBACK makes the final error
of turning her attack to the support of iso-
tionism. According to her, the purpose of the
uminum drive was to lead the American people
wards war. "At the time of its initiation tie
nerican people ere still whole-heartedly
:ainst intervention. 'Something was needed to
vaken them, to arouse the war frenzy which
akes war conditions bearable."
Fortunately, such gross misrepresentations of
ct are not typical of the appeals of thoughtful
olationists; and Miss Slautterback's campaign
their support will bring forth no words of com-
endation from them. For they, like the inter-
ntionists, recognize that unfounded statements
n do nothing but defame themselves and their

LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
ASU Replies To Swander
To the Editor:
HOMER SWANDER believes that Hitler It a
menace to America and will not be defeated
without all-out American aid. He could have
made a constructive contribution to anti-fascist
student sentiment and action by devoting Wed-
nesday's editorial column to hard cold facts
about the menace of Hitler and those who would
appease Hitler in America. Instead, he pre-
ferred to write a hysterical, confusing attack on
one of the foremost anti-fascist organizations on
the campus and entitled his orgy of red-baiting:
The ASU Changes Its Tune.
Mr. Swander treated the American Student
Union as a Communist organization, which he
knows is not true. He justified his name-calling
by the accusation that we follow a "Moscow
line". A less superficial examination of our'
progress will reveal that it has always been an
anti-fascist program in tl e interests of the
American people.
T WAS NpT ONLY with words that we sup-
ported the heroic battle of the Spanish loyal-
ists against the fascists. Three of our members
fought in Spain; one died there. Most people to-
day realize that the Munich appeasement policy
was disastrous for America and the world. Yet
the ASU was the only organization, to hold a
rally protesting Munich in 1939. We led the
demand for collective security qparantining the
aggressor by mutual assistance pacts between
the democracies, a policy which would have pre-
vented the outbreak of thepresent war.
The sabotage of the policy of collective secur-
ity led directly to the outbreak of the second
World War, During the war the policy of Munich
was continued: the policy of bargaining with
Hitler in the hope that he would turn his attack
against the Soviet Union. The phony war, the
support of the Finnish bandits, the collapse of
France were all parts of a policy of appeasement.
In the interests of the American people we
advocated neutrality in the war and cooperation
with the Soviet Union and China, not because
we endorsed the Soviet Union's form of govern-
ment but because she was a powerful nation and
a nation at peace. By such cooperation we could
not only have ensured our security but also could
have influenced the entire course of the war
and constituted an insurmouptable barrier to
Hitler's plans for conquering the world.
WHEN HITLER ATTACKED the Soviet Union,
. however, the warring nations could not
seize the opportunity for which they had been
working. Through their own gifts to him, Hitler
has become so strong that a peace with him
today would make Britain or America a puppet
nation. In addition, the peoples of Britain and
America are so strongly anti-fascist that they
would not allow their governments to betray
them again. The belligerent countries were forced
to abandon their Munich policy and fight for
their very existence.
This, then is now a war for national inde-
pendepce of our country and all others. Every
class, every age group has an interet in victory
for the allies.
Today we cannot afford to be complacent
about the outcome of the war. Britain and the
Soviet Union will win only with American all-out
aid. For this reason the ASU has supported
every measure toward campus unity. A move-
ment embracing not only SDD and the ASU,
but also all other groups on the campus would
be an effective answer to the appeasement forces
who claim the state of Michigan for their own.
O SABOTAGE such unity is to follow the
course of some Chinese "liberals" who fear
the "left" elements more thanthey fear Japan.
We may have differences about our past, or
other differences. To discuss our past policies
at great length is to divert attention from the
main issues of today. We may have differences
about how to attain a better America in which
to lie. But to argue endlessly about these dif-

ferences is to allow Hitler to make up our minds
for us. We have a war to win and red-baiting
will not help us to win it.
-Executive Committee
American Student Union
destroyed-not reformed." He also says, "I be-
lieve that this nation requires a biological purge
if it is to check the growing numbers of the
physically inferior, the mentally ineffective, and
the antisocial . ."
WHEN HOOTON gives the German's ruth-
less slaughter as an example of their
degeneracy and therefore 'advocates their
complete obliteration, isn't he condemning
his own idea? And who will be the final
judge of who should be purged and who
should not?
On this shaky foundation, last Thursday in
front of the public, which is ignorant of the ins
and outs of physical anthropology, Hooton came
to a number of startling conclusions. For ex-
ample, he seemed on the verge of fantasy when
he gave physical degeneracy as the reason the
French didn't pay their war debt (the French
war debt would also seem a little out of Hooton's
field). And can this French degeneracy really be
explained by the fact that they were "dragged"
into World War I by the ruthless Germans. Was-
n't Hooton getting a little dogmatic when he con-
tinued by laying the blame for World ' War I
(which also might be considered a little out of his
field) on the Germans? It is generally accepted
that the Germans were a cause of the war, and
perhaps/ even a major cause, but to say they
un,,n FTrVL .ro r-cpa ncrhf ha d1x, narffln+rnJf

C&
Drew Pedrso
ad Q
Robert S.Atlen
WASHINGTON-There will be plenty of fire-
woks at the CIO convention opening in Detroit
Monday, but not over foreign policy if anti-
Lewis leaders can help it.
John L.'s opponents are gunning for bigger
game than rebuking the grandstanding miner
chief's isolationism.
The anti-Lewis forces will concentrate all
their efforts on plans to revise the CIO constitu-
tion to wrest from Lewis the powers by means of
which he has been able largely to control the
organization even though not in the driver's
seat.
Specifically, the antis will press for three
charges:
1.-To strengthen the authority of President
Phil Murray; 2.-Create a permanent, elective
office of secretary-treasurer at $7,500 a year;
3.-Put the selection and control of subordinate
department officials directly in the hands of
the President.
Also, the antis will try to eliminate several
Lewis henchmen from the ranks of the vice-
presidergts and the executive council.
JAMES B. CAREY, former head of the Elec-
J trical and Radio Workers and a vigorous
anti-Lewisite, is now secretary-treasurer by Mur-
ray's appointment. Because he is an appointed
officer, Carey's authority is limited and he has
no power over department officials. The anti-
Lewis forces propose to give him this control
by making the office elective and then electing
Carey.'
The purpose of giving Murray greater control
over ,subordinate CIO officials is to open the
way for getting rid ,of Lee Pressman, general
counsel, and several other close Lewis henchmen
who owe their jobs to him. It will be brought
out at the convention that Pressman is getting
$10,000 a 'year-a salary fixed by Lewis.
Murray Will Run
MURRAY definitely will be a candidate for
re-election.
He is still convalescing from his recent heart
attack, but 'is greatly improved and is willing to
take , another term provided his authority is
strengthened and Carey is elected secretary-
treasurer to handle the burden of administra-
tive details.
Outwardly, relations between Lewis and Mur-
ray are friendly, but privately they are not. In-
siders say that when Lewis visited Murray d'ur-
ing his convalescence, Lewis remarked as they
parted: "Well, so long, Phil. It was nice to have
known you."
While the strategy of the anti-Lewisites is to
avoid raising an issue over his isdlationism, or
any other extraneous question, they are pre-
pared to fight him on it if he injects the matter
into the convention. There is very bitter feeling
within the CIO against 'Lewis' isolationist stand
anq if he touches off this bombshell he'll be in
for a hot battle.
Rude Awakening
In Mexico .
THE TEETH OF PROGRESS are
grinding a most cherished institu-
tion in Mexico.
Suppression of the aesthetic soul of the Mexi-
can began last January when consternation was
spread among government employes by an order
that they must work right. through the day
without stopping for their regular afternoon
siesta.
And now the Chamber of Commerce of the
City of Mexico has asked all department store
clerks to eschew the siesta also, in order to per-
mit' an earlier closing of stores.

THUS FAR, apparently, store clerks have been
too stunned to reply to this order which
strikes at the very roots of the siesta, sybaritic
slumber of sunny southern afternoons. For the
siesta is to the Mexican what air is to a bird-it
frees him from the mundane realities of life. It
is the oldest of Mexican institutions-older than
the first Spanish conquistadores, older, than
Montezuma and the legend of Quetzacotl.
But it is a waster of time. Previous attempts
to abolish it have failed notably. Perhaps Presi-
dent Avila Camacho can succeed where others
did not. For no subscriber to the siesta is this
newest of Mexican leaders. In fact, he is the
very antithesis of that lethargic frame of mind,
arising at 6 a.m., despising those conservatives
who sleep in the daytime and frequently working
far into the night.
APPARENTLY he has succeeded in instilling
into his subordinates some of his own fire,
for no report from Mexico has carried news that
the ban on the siesta in government offices has
failed. But putting it into effect among private
citizens-that is a far different thing.
For, among other things, the siesta has be-
come a tradition. And the leader of one of
Mexico's neighbor nations has found that tradi-
tion is a difficult thing to monkey with-even
when it is such a simple tradition as having
Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday.
-Bill Baker
by a people so crazy with violence and
hatred?
Of course, any scientist like Hooton, as every
American. still has his right to freedom of sneech.

i

0 Get Hep,
Jitterbugs
By TOM THUMB
AMERICA is a funny animal.
One aspect of American culture
that strikes me as being peculiar is
the nonsensical words of her songs,
both popular and standard.
There is no American word which
is more standard than Ihome on the
Range. Have you ever stopped to
analyze the meaning of the lyric to
Mr. Roosevelt's favorite song? Well,
shut up and listen:
OH. GIVE ME A HOME WHERE
THE BUFFALO ROAM,
AND THE DEER AND THE AN-
TELOPE PLAY.
Is it possible to imagine Fanyone,
much less the President of the United
States, wanting a home with animals
walking all over it? If you've ever
awakened with a horse in your bed,
you'll know that's bad enough, but to
have deer, antelope and-yes, buffalo
messing up your good carpets and
stampeding your furniture-egad!
WHERE SELDOM IS HEARD A
DISCOURAGING WORD
It may sound good. but try to imag-
ine a society in which nobody ever
di:ccurage- anyone. For instance, the
baby decides he's going to eat Papa's
salary check. Don't discourage him.
Go right ahead. Chauncey, Papa'll get
another one in two weeks. Positively
Freudian!
AND THE SKIES ARE NOT
CLOUDY ALL DAY
What day? Cheer up, Frank. There
are very few days anywhere when
the sky's cloudy all of the time. Now,
don't you worry your little head bald'
about the clouds. You're not asking
much there, and I think we can grant
your request, but the buffalo and the
antelope-well, I don't know.
* * * '
0UR NEXT analysis is of a typical
popular song, obviously penned
by a reformed incendiarist.
I DON'T WANT TO SET THEf
WORLD ON FIRE.
Now look. All of Europe and Asia
going up in smoke-sabotage over
here, the interventionists and the iso-
lationists all going up in smoke-and
along comes a guy who says he does-
n't want to start any fires. O.K.,
you're too late anyway.
I JUST WANT TO START THE
FLAME IN YOUR HEART
Oh, so that's your game, is it? He
wants to give somebody a severe case
of heartburn. Electrocution is too
good for guys like that.
IN MY HEART THERE IS BUT
ONE DESIRE,
AND THAT ONE IS YOU, NO
OTHER WILL DO.
Look. bub, in your heart there are
two auricles and two ventricles, thick
muscular walls, tricuspid, mitral and
semilunar valves, and blood. That's
all. Nothing else.
LET'S SKIP to a ballad popular
several season ago which lends
itself particularly well to analysis:
OUT OF THE DARKNESS YOU
SUDDENLY APPEARED
Black magic! First you see it then
you don't. Or vice versa. Science is
grand, ain't it?
YOU SMILED AND I WAS TAK-
EN BY SURPRISE, N
Why the surprise? Did she have
green teeth? Or a yellow tongue,

maybe?
I GUESS I SHOULD HAVE SEEN
RIGHT THROUGH YOU,
Isn't it sort of cold to be going
without a slip, kid?
BUT THE MOON GOT IN MY
EYES.
Neatest trick of the week. Paging
Mr. Ripley. The moon's diameter is
2,160 miles. The average diameter of
the human eye is about one inch.
Figure it out for yourself, folks.
I WAS SO THRILLED WITH
THE LOVE YOU VOLUN-
TEERED,
I GAVE MY HEART WITHOUT
A COMPROMISE,
He: Who will volunteer?
She: I.
He: Wow! Here, have a heart. With
your low blood pressure, you need it
more than I do.
I THOUGHT A KINGDOM WAS
IN SIGHT
THAT I WOULD HAVE A
FIGHT TO CLAIM,
This is too silly. Figure it out for
yourself.
BUT. WITH THE MORNING'S
EARLY LIGHT,
I DIDN'T HAVE A DREAM TO
MY NAME.
What's happened here, is obviously
this: The babe. whose name is

"Too bad Joe and Ed couldn't come-they got some cracked ideas about
preferring warm fires and easy chairs to this."
DAI LY OFF I CIAL BULLETIN.

i o

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1941
VOL. LII. No. 41
'Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
1henbers of the University.
Notices
Public Health Assembly: An assem-
bly of ,all students in Public Health
will be held on Tuesday, November
18, at 4:00 p.m. in the Auditorium of
the W. K. Kellogg Foundation Insti-
tute. Dr. Haven Emerson, Professor
Emeritus of Public iealth Practice,
Columbia University and Lecturer in
Public Health Practice, University of
Michigan. will speak on "Uniformity
of Procedure in Communicable Dis-
ease Control." Students are expected
to be present.
School of Music Freshmen may
have their grades for the five-week
period by calling at the office of the
School of Music today.
Bronson-Thomas Prize in Ger-
man. Value $32.00. Open to all under-
graduate students in German of dis-
tinctly American training. Will be
awarded' on the results of a three-
hour essay competition to be held
under departmental supervision in
the latter half of March, 1942 (exact
date to be announced two weeks in
advance). Contestants must satisfy
the Department that they have done
their reading in German. The essay
may be written in English or German.
Each contestant will be free to choose
his own subject from a list of 30
offered. Students who wish to com-
pete must be taking a course in Ger-
man (32 or above) at the time of the
competition. They should register
and obtain further details as soon as
possible at the office of the Ger-
man Department, 204 University
Hall.
Candidates for the Teacher's Cer-
tificate for February and June 1942:
A list of candidates has been posted
,on the bulletin board of the School
of Education, Room 1431 U.E.S. Any
prospective candidate whose name
does 'not appear on this list shuld
call at the office of the Recorder of
the School of Education, 1437 U.E.S.
Certificate of Eligibility: At the be-
ginning of each semester and sum-
mer session every 'student shall be
conclusively presumed to be ineligible
for any public activity until his eli-
gibility is affirmatively established
by obtaining from the Chairman of
the Committeeon Student Affairs, in
the Office of the Dean of Students, a
Certificate of Eligibility.
Before permitting any students to
participate in a public activity, the
chairman or manager of suc activity
shall (a) require each applicant to
present a certificate ofeligibility, (b)
sign his initials on the back of such
certificate, and (c) file with the
Chairman of the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs the names of all those
who have presented certificates of
eligibility and a signed statement to
exclude all others from participation.
Blanks for the chairmen's lists may be
obtained in the Office of the Dean of
Students.
Faculty, College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts: Midsemester re-
ports are due not later than Satur-
day, November 22.
Report cards are being distributed
to all, departmental offices. Green
cards are being provided for fresh-
men reports; they should be returned
to the office of the Academic Coun-

registered in other schools or col-
leges of the University should be re-
ported to the school or college in
which they are registered.
Additional cards may be had at 108
Mason Hall or 1220 Angell Hal.
E. A. Walter, Assistant Dean
}RCA Interviews: ;E'o representa-
tives of RCA Manufacturing Com-
pany will be in this office today from
9 to 5 to interview students from the
following departmepts: Mechanical
engineering, electrical engineering,
physics, chemical engineering and in-
dustrial engineering.
This includes both February and
June graduates and graduate stu-
dents. Kindly call at the Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational In-
formation, 201 Mason Hall, or tele-
phone 4121--extension 371 for ap-
pointments. Application blanks are
also to be filled out in advance.
Registration for Permanent Job:
Students are reminded that today is
the last day registration blanks can
be obtained from th Bureau of Ap-
pointments without payment of $1.00
late registration fee.
This is the only registration to be
herd during the year, and February,
June and August graduates, as Well
as graduate students desiring the
assistance of the Bureau, should reg-
ister at this time. Both Teaching
and General Divisions are registering
students. Candidates for teaching
certificates are required by the Uni-
versity to register with the Bureau.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information
League House Presidents who have
not called for Red Cross materials,
please get them in Miss McCormick's
office at the League immediately.
Academic Notices
Master's Candidates in History:
The language examination will be giv-
en at. 4:00 p.m. today in Room B,
Haven Hall. Candidates must bring
their own dictionaries. Copies of
old examinations are on file in the
Basement Study Hall of the General
Library.
Political Science 85 v/ill not meet
today. H. J. Heneman.
Political Science 51, Section 2, will
not meet today. H. J. Heneman.
Mathematics 6, Section 1 (Dr. Kap-
lan's section) will not meet Satur-
day morning.
Upper class and graduate women:
Instruction will be given in ice skat-
ing, badminton, beinning swimming,
plays and' games for children, and
body conditioning. Students inter-
ested in joining these classes should
register today and Saturday, Novem-
ber 15, in Office 14, Barbour Gym-
nasium.
Concerts
Choral Union Concert: Giovanni
Martinelli and Ezio Pinza will give a
joint program of songs, arias, and
duets, in the Choral Union Concert
Series, Tuesday, November 18, at 8:30
o'clock, in Hill Auditorium. A limit-
ed number of tickets for this concert,
and succeeding concerts, are avail-
able at the offices of the University
Musical Society in Burton Memorial
Tower.
Charles A. Sink, President
Student Recital: On Sunday, No-

GRIN AND BEAR IT By Lichty
~& "
&
C ~ 'C

-Clayton Dickey

H ootdn's Argumrent
Raises Questions .
HARVARD'S eminent Professor Hooton
giving scientific sanction to blood

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