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October 29, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ight Daily Reporter Hoaxed
IrkSearch Of Siberian Student

Secretary Knox Reviews Navy Day Parade In Detroit

Frank Knox, Secretary of the Navy, observed Navy Day by reviewing Detroit's parade from the deck of a
120-foot replica of a destroyer on the city hall lawn. Left to right: Brig. Gen. Heinrich A. Pickert, parade
marshal; Knox; and Mayor Edward J. Jeffries.

d Forester Wins
t Annual Award
Of Camp Roth
Carl D. Meier '42F&C, got the axe
-but it was presented to him at a
recent meeting of the Forestry Club!
by a national axe company for his
superior field and class ,ability dis-
played last summer at Camp Filibert
Roth, the forestry school's summer'
camp.
The axe given Meier is a two-
pound cruiser's axe. In addition to
this trophy his name was also placed
with the names of the other winners
b since 1935 upon which is mounted a
f special seven and one-half pound
axe. This panel is the permanent
possession of the forestry school.
Camp Roth, at which Meier won
s this recognition, is located in the
Ottawa National Forest on Golden
- Lake in Iron County, Mich. It is
f yearly sponsored by the University
n and it is compulsory for all students
enrolled in the forestry school to at-
tend the 10-week summer session.
Slosson Talks
n On Slav Pliolht
r
Nazi Defeat Only Solution,
ProfessorDeclares
"The future of the Western Slavs
depends completely and entirely on
the defeat of Nazi Germany," de-
clared Prof. Preston Slosson last night
in the amphitheatre of the Rack-
ham Building as he delivered the
first of a series of lectures spon-
sored by the Slavic Club.
Concerning himself with the topic,
"The Future of the Western Slavs,"
he pointed out that with closer union
and active participation in a new
order in Europe-there is every rea-
son to suppose that Poland and
Czecho-Slovakia will regdin their for-
mer position after the economic
wounds of the war have healed and
may, in fact, advance to an unher-
alded position.
After discussing the factors in the
early development of the Slavic race,
Professor Slosson said that in the
event of a Nazi victory the Slavs will
be either abolished, Germanized, or
reduced to a slave status.
In the question and answer period
following his address, the lecturer
conjectured that the advocated unit-
ing of the race after the war would
probably be on the basis of three
great states, the Eastern Slavs, the
Western Slavs, and the Southern
Slays.
To Address Conference '
Five membr of ilh falcr^+k 4

SDD To Urge
Neutrality Act
Repeal Here
Campus Group Will Open
Drive For Signatures
Tomorrow Morning
Petitions urging the immediate re-
peal of the Neutrality Act will be
circulated on campus tomorrow by
members of the Student Defenders
of Democracy.
The drive for signatures is to get
under way at 9:00 a.m., at which
time a table will be set up on the
diagonal in front of the General Li-
brary. Volunteer workers will remain
at the table throughout the day,
while others will circulate the peti-
More detailed information con-
cerning the history, program and
objectives of the local chapter of
the Student Defenders of Democ-
racy appears in a letter-to-the-
editor on the editorial page of to-
day's Daily.
tions in fraternity houses, coopera-
tives and dormitories.'
At the conclusion of the local drive
the petitions are to be sent to Con-
gress by the Student Defenders of
Democracy, wheie the signatures will
be added to those obtained on other
campuses throughout the nation.
All students interested in helping
fill out the petitions are urged to call
Hale Champion, '44, publicity direc-
tor of the SDD, or Don O'Connor,
'42, treasurer.
Bargaining Voting
In Ford Company
Postponed By NLB
WASHINGTON, Oct. 28. - )-
The National Labor Board has post-
poned for 30 days collective bargain-
ing elections originally scheduled to
be held tomorrow in 14 feeder plants
of the Ford Motor Company in Mich-
igan.
The elections were postponed at the
request of the American Federation of
Labor, which had charged certain-
employes of the Ford plants were
campaigning in favor of the CIO
United Automobile Workers. The
election will determine whether the
employes are to be represented for.
collective bargaining by the CIO
Union or by the AFL United Auto
Workers, or by neither.
The postponement, the Board said,!
would give it an opportunity to in-y
vestigate the AFL's charges.
At Detroit, Frank'H. Bowen, NLRB
regional director, said the AFL had
filed charges of unfair labor prac-

Who's Who'
Will Publish
Local Names
Biographies of twenty students of
the University will appear in the
1941-42 edition of Who's Who among
Students in American Universities
and Colleges.
The students who will be repre-
sented in this publication are Jane
Baits, Norman Call, Bill Cartmill,
Virginia Frey, Jim Galles, Emile Gel,
Jack Grady, Patriciat Hadley, Jean
Hubbard, Daniel Huyett, Alfred
Owens, Alfred Piel, Margaret San-
ford, Donelda Schaible, Gus Share-
met, Robert Sibley, Bill Slocum, Don
Stevenson, Robert Wallace and Bob
Westfall.
The 1941-42 issue is the eighth
publication of the collegiate Who's
Who
[DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1941
VOL. LII.' No. 27
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices
Senate Reception: Since no indi-
vidual invitations are being sent, this
is a cordial invitation to all members
of the teaching, administrative, and
research staff and, their wives to be
present at the Senate Reception to
new members of the faculties on Tues-
day, November 4, in the ballroom of
the Michigan Union at 8:30 p.m. The
reception will take place from 8:30
to 10:00 o'clock, after which thete
will be dancing from 10:00 to 12:00.
It is especially hoped that new teach-
ing fellows and instructors may be
present and the chairmen of depart-
ments are asked to be of assistance in
bringing this about:
Choral Union Members: Pass tick-
ets for the Emanuel Feuermann con-
cert will be issued to members in
good standing who call in pDrson,
between the hours of 10 and 12 and
1 and 4, Thursday, October 30, at
the offices of the University Musical
Society in Burtort Memorial Tower.
After four o'clock no tickets will be
issued.
Charles A. Sink, President
Faculty of the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: The five-week
freshman reports will be due Noven-
(Continued on Page 4)

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u es o eacuty or the tices againstthe Ford Company in
Medical School will address the Cen- connection with the election.
tral Society for Clinical Research at Bowen said the union's charges
a meeting t8 be held in Chicago, would be investigated by his office
from Oct. 31 to Nov. 2. t and a report sent to Washington.
usic in a bancin ooda-
HERB MILLER
and His Orchestra
GIRL VOCALIST CONTEST
Saturday, Nov. I and Friday, Nov. 7
Permanent Girl Vocalist'to be chosen
by POPULAR vote.
of the DANCING public.

I HOUR ONLY, THURSDAY 4 P.M. to 5 P.M.
ONLY 200 TO BE SOLD AT THIS 1-HOUR SALE, BY AR RANGEMENT' WITH THE MANUFACTURER OF THESE
NATIONALLY ADVERTISED DRY SHAVERS; WE AR E LIMITED TO 200 ONLY. GET YOURS AT ONCE!
PATENTED IN
$15 Underwood "President" UNIED LAT,
:.: ENGLAND,

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