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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 23, 1941 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-09-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


)AY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1941

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- -

weture Series

Official Map Aids Puzzled Campus Newcomers

Topics Cover
Many Sub jects
Herring, Esdarila, Monge
To Give Speeches Here;
Others Will Be Invited
Every conceivable subject from An-
dean biology to current and past his-
.tory will undergo close scrutiny in
the series of University Lectures to be
presented throughout the coming
academic year.,
Only a few lectures have been
definitely scheduled for the coming
year, according to Dr. F. E. Rob-
bins, assistant to the president and
director of the University Lecture
Series. Others will be added from
time to time throughout the year.
Among the lecturers that have ac-
cepted invitations to give talks here
are Hubert Herring, who has con-
ducted a Summer Seminar in Mexi-
co, and who will speak under spon-
sorship of the Committee of Latin
% American Studies, probably Nov. 24.
Arundell Esdarila, former secre-
tary of the British Museum, will
speak under the sponsorship of the
Department of Library Science, and
John Garstang of the University of
Liverpool will talk under the auspices
of the history department. Nov. 19
has been tentatively set as the date
for the Garstang lecture.
Dr. Carlos Monge of Lima, Peru,
has been invited to speak here under
the sponsorship of the Department of
Botany. Dr. Monge is director of the
Instituto Nacional de Biologia An-
diha.
Other lecturers will be arranged
throughout the year. University lec-
tures are made possible through a
special University Lecture Fund. Vari-
ous departments apply to Dr. Robbins
office to secure funds to sponsor lec-
tures. t
Churches Give
Oportun it es
For Worship
Many Social, Recreational
Programs Are Provided
By 18 Organizations
University students have at their
disposal during the school year the
facilities for religious worship and the
social and recreational programs pro-
vided by 18 religious organizations
which are represented in Ann Arbor.
Baptist students may participate in
the worship, discussion and study of
the Roger Williams; Guild. Religious,
social and educational activities for
catholic students are centered around
St. Mary's Chapel.
Christian Science Group
The First Church of Christ, Scien-
tist, is open to all Christian Science
students. The student organization
of the Congregational Church is the
Pilgrim Fellowship which offers a
varied program of worship, study,
drama, music, science, service and
recreation.
Local student organization of the
Michigan Christian Foundation is the
Disciples Guild. Luncheons and dis-
cussion meetings are held at the
Guild House. Established more than
60 years ago and center for Episcopal
students on the campus is the Epis-
copal Student Guild.
Social and recreational facilities
are provided for university students
rwho are members of the Evangelical
and Reformed Church at the Bethle-

hem Church.
Quaker worship is held under the
auspices of the Ann Arbor Meeting of
the Religious Society of Friends.
Hillel Foundation
One of the most active religious
groups on the campus is the society
for Jewish students, the Hillel Foun-
dation. The American and United
Lutheran Churches sponsor .a local
Lutheran Student Association which
has been a gathering place for Luth-
eran students for 24 years.
Another group offereing facilities
to Lutheran students is the St. Paul
Lutheran Student Group which is af-
filiated with the Missouri Synod of
the Lutheran Church. A part of the
national Methodist Student Move-
ment which is represented at 120 col-
leges is the Wesley Foundation for
Methodist students.
The Michigan Christian. Fellow-
ship, a student organization of evan-
gelical Christian faith, is devoted to
giving fellowship to Christian stu-
dents and winning students to Christ.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Saints also holds services on the
campus.
PresLyterian Society
Student members of the Presby-
terian faith may participate in the
prcgram presented yearly by the
Westminster Guild. The Student
E angelical League offers services of
the orthodox, historic Christianity in

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University Driving Regulations
Interpreted By Dean's Office
C _inero__g.)his home, will not be considered a
driving ehealth matter of concern to University au-
sarydrvn needs as:hel, busi- thoirities: pro 'ided:
ness, family use, commuting, chauf- ? a The car is not drive
feuring, etc.mthrough or within the immediate
The Automobile Regulation will vicinity of Ann Arbor.
become effective at 8 A.M., Monday, l Such driving does, not in-
September 29, and all students must volve a violation of ary law or
refrain from driving until permits traffic ordinance.
have been obtained at Room 2, Uni- 6. Students within the following
versity Hall. groups may apply for exemption
Regulations Outlined from the Ruling by calling in person
1. Regents' Rule. "No student in at the Office of the Dean of Students
attendance at the University from and reporting the make, type and
and after the beginning of the first license number of the car.
semester of the University year 1927- (a) Those who are 26 years of
28 shall operate any motor vehicle, age or older.
In exceptional and extraordinary (b) Those who are receiving
cases in the discretion of the Dean credit for not more than eight
of Students this rule may be re- hours of academic work per semes-
laxed." The regulation governs the ter.
u'e of a car as well as the operation (c) Those, who hold University
of one; consequently it is not per- positions which entitle them to the
missible for a student to use his car faculty rating of instructor or
or a family owned car for social, per- higher.
sonal or any other purposes when__
the car is driven by any person who
is not a member of his immediate M e ' C thing(
family.
2. A student receiving permission
to use an automobile must adhere Styles ot
strictly to the terms of, his permit.
Before any driving is done, student :
permit tags must be attached to the I C E
State license plates in such a manner
as to insure easy visibility. Any act (Continued from Page 3)
of driving without permission from
this office, or with permit tags un- wear, which men are ever more de-
attached, will be considered a viola- manding in their apparel.
tion of the Ruling and will be disci- The three buttoned, single-breasted
plined accordingly. uit jacket issvery much in style this
3. All permits must be renewed all. In addition to being a revivl of
when the 1942 State license plates icur grandfather's business suit, the
are required or as soon as the new rend has been forced on by the lack
tags are purchased. At such time, >f materials for clothing manufac-
new sets of permit tags bearing the ure. The next few .years will see
current license number will be issued double-breasted coats definitely oi
at no additional cost to the holders. hf decline.
All permit tags obtained this fall will Military Touch
be void as soon as it is unlawful to Sport coats are taking on a mili-
drive with 1941 license il-'tes. ary touch, with wool gaberdine, cov-
Stored Car Irovislons :rt cloth, cavalry twill and tweeds
4. Where any appreciable saving hetlands and cashmeres in vogue
in transportation costs is realized, ?robably soon to make its appearance
students may drive their cars to Ann n college campuses will be the "sta-
Arbor and place them in dead stor- pion-wagon" jacket. This three but-
age until vagtdion periods. This pro- ton front, action back and half bell
vision will not be available to stu- affair was born in the far West, but
dents whose homes are relatively is moving East rapidly.
close to the University, for example, Incidentally, although sport and
cities within a 150-mile radius of suit jackets are the longest this year
Ann Arbor: Such an arrangement, -hat they have ever been, 31 inches
when approved, will not entitle the topcoats and overcoats are becoming
owners of the cars to any special shorter. No reason is known, but
consideration with respect to tem- yhat's the way it is.
porary or week-end driving privi- And when you step out in forma
leges. Full information on stored clothes, you'll be in the great minority
cars, including name and address of if you're wearing anything but mid.
owner and location of storage, must night blue with lapels rolled to the
be reported to this office before the tower or upper button. Shawl collar:
beginning of the school year. After and black "just ain't" this season.
that date, cars rhay not be brought Finally, the white shirt still lead:
to Ann Arbor, unless the circum- the field, but if you insist on colorns
stances are first approved by this solids in broadcloths are the best
office. beating out stripes by a wide margin
5. The operation of a car by an And watch long collars, they arE
out-of-town student, in and about really stretching this fall.

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THE CAMPUS OF ENE UNIVERSITY OF MICNIG AI

I
Into the maze-like labyrinth of Ann,
Arbor and its University of Michigan
:ampus 2,500 neophytes will come
this week, freshmen and transfers
perplexed and bewildered by it all.
In order that such bewildered new-
.omers won't have to ask too many
people the familiar "Can you tell me
how to get there?", The Daily pre-
sents this latest official map of the
campus, with it's own "Where's
Where in Ann Arbor."
Center of campus activities is the
Michigan Union, located at the junc-
tion of State St. and Squth University.
Rubbed "The Men's Clhub of the Cam-
pus," the Union has a swimming pool,
bowling alleys, barber shop, billiard
room, lounging room, restaurant ser-
vice, the famed Tap Room, an assem-
bly hall which is used for banquets,
meetings, conventions, smokers and
dances throughout the year.
West Quadrangle
Behind the Union is the West
Quadrangle, one of the men's dorm-
itory units. Morris Hall, band and
broadcasting headquarters, is direct-
'All A' Students
Are Announced
By OUniversity
n (Continued from Page 3)

ly north of the Union at the corner
of State and E. Jefferson.
In the next block is Angell Hall,
imposing edifice "where lit students
meet under the clock," and home of
the University's academic atmos-
phere. Across the street is Newberry
Hall, a museum of classical archaeol-
ogy. The building contains discov-
eries unearthed by University explor-
ations in Egypt/ Syria and Mesopo-
t mia.
Ra Women's Dorms
North of Newberry Hall on State
St. are the Helen Newberry and Betsy
Barbour Residences for undergradu-
ate women. The telephone number,
just to save you the trouble of look-
ing it up, which you eventually would,
is 2-2591. The Student Publications
Building is directly behind the Helen
Newberry Residence. The Daily, Gar-
goyle, Michiganensian and Perspec-
tives are born there. The Daily's
composing room and flat bed press are
located'on the. first flogr.
The School of Music is located one
block north on Maynard St. The
building contains its own auditorium,
studios and practice rooms for piano,
voice, violin and all other musical
instruments.
The Hill Auditorium, on North
University, is the home of many lead-
ing events at the University. Its spa-
cious stage has seen many stars of
the May Festival, Choral Union con-
certs, and Oratorical Association pro-
gram. Behind iHill Auditorium is the
Burton Memorial Tower, which con-
tains the Baird Carillon, author of the
melodic chimes that denote each
quarter hour on campus.
A half block north on Washing-
ton St. is the Horace H. Rackham
School of Graduate Studies. One of
the finest buildings of its kind in the
country, it contains lecture halls,
study, reading, discussion and con-
ference rooms.
Center of Coed Activities
South of the Graduate School on
N. University is the League, center
of coed activities on campus. It has
beautiful drawing rooms, a chapel,
dinning rooms, cafeteria, ballroom
and sleeping rooms. The Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre is located in one
wing of the building.
Not shown on the map is the cam-
pus' latest addition, the Cooley Mem-

orial Fountain located on the park-
way west of the League.
The School of Dentistry is located
east of the League. The Kellogg Foun-
dation Institute for Graduate and
Post-Graduate Dentistry was pre-
sented to the University by the Kel-
logg Foundation two years ago. It is
unique in that it is the only insti-
tute devoted especially to graduate
and post-graduate dentistry in the
United States.
Health Servipe
On Fletcher Street across from the
League is the new Health Service.
The Health Service provides prac-
tically all the medical attention that
a student needs during the school
year.
The University Museums Building
at the corner of Washtenaw Avenue
and N. University contains the Mu-
seum of Anthropology, the Univer-
sity Herbarium, the Museum of Pal-
eontology and the Museum of Zoo-
logy. Thousands of interesting speci-
mens are on exhibit here.
Across Washtenaw is the East Med-
ical Building. The older unit is on the
West Side of the street. The offices,
classes and laboratoriesnof the School
of Medicine are located in these build-
ings. South of the West Medical
Building is the East Physics Building
behind which are the Pharmacology
and Economics Buildings. Next to

the East Physics Building is the West
Engineering Building with additional
classes across the street.
Martha Cook Dorm
The Martha Cook dormitory for
junior and senior women is located
at the corner of Haven Ave. and S.
University. North of this is the Wil-
lianf L. Clements Library of American
History. The library contains an out-
standing collection of books,. maps.
and manuscripts relating to the ear-
ly history of this country.
Behind the Clements Library\ is
the, West Physics Building to the
north of which is the General Lib-
rary. On .its shelves are more than
600,000 volumes and 14,000 maps
West of the Clements Library is the
residence of President Ruthven. Near
this is Tappan Hall, which houses the
School of Business Administration,
Architecture' College
On Monroe Street back of the Law
Quad are the College of Architecture
and the University High. and Ele-
mentary Schools. On Willard Street
back of the High School is the East
Quadrangle, another men's dormi-
tory.
The Intramural Building and Yost
Field House and Ferry Field (showr
in the insert) are south of the campu
dcwn State Street. The Stadium is or
Main and Stadium Boulevard.

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---- - ---- -

Z ..

""""'"''"'"'

p

Hollowell, William E. Howard, Alice
P. Kramer, Robert A. Kromer, Robert
H. Langlois, Julian J. Lasky, taniel
Levine, Joseph Likovsky, Garland J.
Marrs, Sidney Milgrom, Peggy P..
Muirhead, Dorothy I. -Munro, Cor-
neal B. Myers, Jr., Jeremiah J. Philp,I
Johannes D. Plekker, Shou S. Pu,
Leonard Reus, Charlotte L. Robbins,
George Robertson, Jr., and Robert L.
Schaefer.
The registrar's office also named
Kenneth Schweitzer, James W. Skin-
ner, Anthony Stampolis, Betty C.
Stevens, Richard E. Stifel, Dorothy
Stiglitz, Anne I. Tammela, Tudor L.
Thomas, Arthur G. Volz, Jr., Kath-
leen Walters, Evelyn E. West, Ann R.
Yoedicke, and Helen D. Ziefle.
The twenty-five Summer Session
engineering students making perfect
records were John W. Anderson,
Marcus W. Arthur, John Boshar,
Harry G. Dallas, Jr., James B. Hall,
Gilbert P. Hammond, Paul D. Hann,
Philip W. Hemily, James E. Howard,
Parker T. Jones, Jr., John K. Koffel
and William G. Langton.
Also listed were Eric G. Lindahl,
Conrad Maxmin, Eugene Migotsky,

You need

GOOD

FOOD,

too!

M. Hilary Mallon, B. Evelyn Scott,
Marie Elizabeth Sisson, Manuel Jerry
Soldofsky, and Ruth Rebecca Sprowl.
The eleven School of Education
summer students in this class were
Ernest Cutting, Gertrude Green-
stone, Miriam A. Harris, Irene B.
Holshuh, Florence Jacobstein, Mary

r
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'
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Everybody knows' that babies require good food. But how 'bout
yourself? Are you going to neglect your dit, yourself and per-
haps your success at college? Or are you going to be certain that
you will get the finest available food so that you can give your best
in the classrooms, on the athletic field, and out on that date?
During your stay at Michigan you'll learn about the Flautz Cafe.
Ask any upperclassman. He'll tell you about our delicious home-

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