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October 23, 1941 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Hatch covers are the most fre-
quent source of accidents' on Ameri-
can merchant vessels, the Depart-
ment of Commerce finds.
A NEW STAR IS BORN
WOVEN FROM
THE SANDS OF THE SEA
7- W. 4
xa C
Nm
/i
leaw a 9mef
WOflD.ERTIES
"THE TIES OF THE FUTURE"
$1.50
" Eye-Catching In Appeal
* Smooth As Glass-Durable
" Soft As A Kitten's Ear
* Smartly Styled
* Wrinkles Evaporate Overnight
" Always Retain Their New
Appearance Wear After Wear
* Made In America
Until 2,OQO years Ago, glass was made to
look at and not through . . . and more
than six centuries ago "Dante," the great
poet, wrote-"Al things' may be woven
-even the sands of the sea.' Today, the
sands. of the sea are actually being
woven into "Fiberglas" yarns . . . finer
than the human hair..., and wedded to
silk (gueen of yarns)b ... an amazing
new silk and glass fabric is born to the
neckwear industry. Its beauty, strength,
lustre, wrinkle-resisting and soil-proof
qualities is one of the wonders of modern
day science.
THE DOWNTOWN STORE3
FOR MICHIGAN MEN
taye6
"We Serve to Serve Again"
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGR TURU
Michigan-Gopher Tilt To Feature Midget Halfbacks

Pint-Sized Nelson And Higgins
To Match Speed Here Saturday

. ,i

By BUD HENDEL
The battle of the nation's gridiron
giants here in Ann Arbor this Satur-
day, Michigan vs. Minnesota, may
conceivably develop into an open field
running contest between pint-sized
pigskin speedsters.
For both the Wolverines and Goph-
ers list on their rosters a halfback so
small that he looks like he ought to
confine his football activities to car-
rying the water bucket instead of
mixing it tip on the field with grid-
ders like Al Wistert and Urban Od-
son. But both the little guy on the
Michigan squad and the half pint
that Bernie Bierman is bringipg
down from Minneapolis can throw
more fear into opposing teams than
a half a dozen big fellows with less
speed and;spirit.
Two Mighty Mites
Davey Nelson, the jackrabbit Wol-
verine ball-toter, and Minnesota's
swivel-hipped midget, Bob Higgins,
are the boys who may wreak havoc
upon their giant foes. These two backs
form the flashiest pair of little men
that the Western Conference has seen
for years.
The wee Maize and Blue star tips
the scale at a niere 156 pounds, while
Higgins can't even boast of that much
tonnage. In fact, the Minnesota mite
weighs an insignificant 147 on a good
day 'and after a heavy meal. All of
which means that fellows like Wist-
ert and Bauman are going to have
to guard against standing with their
feet too wide apart, because if they
do one of those miracle midgets will
be off on a solo dash over the chalk
striped terrain.
Sparkle Against Pitt
It was against the punchless Pitts-
burgh Panthers that both of the tiny
gridiron Goliaths really showed their
heels. Nelson scampered for one
touchdown, set up another with a
long run, and returned a punt 52
yards for a score which was called
back. Higgins led the Gophers against
Pitt by tallying three touchdowns and
returning a kickoff 72 yards, as well
as sprinting off runs of 49 and 51
yards.
NOTES FROM A REPORTER'S
CUFF: Michigah's gridmen held an
extensive two hour scrimmage ses-
sion yesterday in which the boys got
a good look at Minnesota pass plays-
as presented by the red shirts. Coach
Fritz Crisler utilized the last part of,
the drill for the rurining of old plays
and, some new maneuvers which he

By ART HILL

Fullback Combination Continues
Trad0ional Minnesota Strength

i
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'':
i

By DICK SIMON
Good fullbacks seem to go with
Minnesota football as thunder goes
with lightning.
At least, the 1941 Gopher squad
seems destined to continue the Min-
nesota tradition for great line-buck-
ers that was inaugurated with Herb
Joesting back in 1925-27, and which
has continued almost without inter-
ruption to the present.
This time it is a pair of returning
veterans-Bill Daley and Bbb Sweig-

If

DAVEY NELSON
has cooked up for the entertainment,
of the Norsemen.
The Wolverines have a quiet air of
confidence about them which may
spell trouble for the Golden Gophers.
The team has been waiting for this
game since last year's 7-6 loss in
Minneapolis, and Saturday will see
a fighting Michigan gridiron machine
going all out in an effort to gain the
driver's seat in the Western C9nfer-
ence title race and win back the Little
Brown Jug.

4_

I'

RABIDEAU- HARRIS

000

ee
what a man!
GIVE HIM CREDIT-THE FELLOW
WHO MAKES THAT LONG RUN . . ,
BUT DON'T FORGET THE THOU-
SANDS OF OTHER FELLOWS WHO
KNOW THEIR 'STUFF" AND WEAR,
RA BIDEAU-HARRIS CLOTHES
r 50
Others priced at $21.00 and $24.50

Gopher-Game
Repeats .Facts
Of '40 Contest
By JO ANN PETERSON
This Saturday won't be the first
time Michigan and Minnesota have
come to grips when they were both
undefeated. This isn't the first time
that Michigan has been ranked third
by the Associated Press with Minne-
sota rated above them. Nor is it the
first time the so-called. Big Nine
championship has been Oexpected to
rest with the winner of the game.
Last Year's News
Take a look at last year's news be-
fore the game. It was startlingly sim-
ilar. True, Michigan was rated third
and Minnesota second, while this
year Minnesota is rated first, but
other than that the outlook is quite
similar.
Bruce Smith was the Minnesota
player who had the most advance
publicity and he made good by car-
rying the ball 80 yards for the lone
Gopher tally. Again this year, it is
Bruce Smith who is being applauded.
In the Michigan lineup a fellow
named Westfall was getting a lot
of attention. He was the boy who
complemented Tom Harmon, who
gave the team a line smasher to
break through the 215 pound wall
that was Minnesota's line.
Something has happened to the
Golden Gophers this year. Perhaps
the food supply has been rationed,
but, at any rate, their line only av-
erages 206 pounds. Nevertheless, this
year, as history repeats itself, except
(perhaps) in the final score, West-
f all is again the player who is counted
on to gain those necessary yards by
charging.
Michigan Seeks Revenge
Last year Minnesota had won six
straight victories over the Wolverines
and Michigan fans were desperate.
Now, as the game rolls around again,
Minnesota is gunning for an eighth
victory, and Michigan players can't
exactly forget Minnesota's heart
breaking 7-6 victory last' year, on a
slippery, uncertain field.
The game is being played in Ann
Arbor this year, there is a promise of
fair weAther, and the Michigan team
is every bit as determined as the
team which outplayed Minnesota last
year but failed to win by the margin
of the conversion point. There is a
saying that "every dog has his day"-
maybe this means the underdog too.
Maybe this Saturday is the day.
'M' CLUB NOTICE
All letter winners are to report
at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Field
House wearing letter-sweaters.
Numeral winners please wear

Big Week For Sports ... .1
It's a great week for Michigan ath-
letics. What with the Northwestern
game safely past, the Minnesota tilt
only two days away and tickets for
that contest scarcer than testimon-
ial dinners for Mickey Owen in Brook-
lyn, there is more excitement on State
Street these days than this little Ger-
man community has known in many
a month.
There's a feeling of tension on the
campus which has, been increasing
since Monday and threatens to break
out in a minor explosion Friday night
when 7,000 or more wild-eyed Michi-
gan fans gather in Yost Field House
for the most meaningful pep rally this
town has seen since 1938.
Back in September of that year,
some of you will remember, Michi-
gan was scheduled to tangle with
Michigan State whom they hadn't
defeated for four years. In those
four games, the Spartans had scored
81 points to Michigan's 27 and had
won four games without benefit of
the breaks, missed extra points or
friendly officials. In short, for
four heart-breaking years, Charley
Bachman's teams had been plainly
superior to those of Harry Kipke.
The night before the game, the rally
was held in Hill Auditorium. The
mammoth theatre was jammed all the
way to the fifth balcony (or however
many there are) and cheers for the
new Michigan coach, Fritz Crisler
from Princeton, were deafening.
When the meeting ended, students'
poured out into the streets and
brought on a minor riot by building
bdnfires at (among several other
places) the corner of Main and Lib-
erty Streets.
The game the next day was al-'
most an anti-climax. Michigan
won without much difficulty. The
14-0 score didn't really indicate the
Wolverines' superiority since their
goal line was never even threatened.
Since that day, Fritz Crisler's clubs
have won three more games from the
Spartans and Michigan students are
coming to consider the annual opener
against Michigan State as a warm-up
game.
Members of the class of 1942 can
thank fate that they entered school
when they did. After four years of
famine/ came four of great football
teams and they have been here to
see it happen.
The season of 1941 is already
assured of success as far as won and
lost percentage goes but there is one
thing that Wolverine seniors want to
see before they graduate. A victory
over Minnesota Saturday will make
college careers complete for most of
them. And it's a possibility. Not a
probability, make no mistake about
that, but a possibility.
Minnesota will be the favorites.
And they should be. You can't
laugh off a line which averages 213
* pounds to the man and a backfield
which has experience on its side
in addition to the speed and ball-
carrying ability which have won it
so much fame.
At that State game rally three years
ago, there was really very little to get
excited about. But not so this week's
clash with the Golden Giants from
the North Country, Michigan can
win but the odds are against it. That's
the reason for the excitement on
State Street these days and that's why
Michigan students are having a tough
time concentrating on their books
these days.
It'll be a great battle and more
than 87,000 people will see the better
team win. The better team always
wind.

r

for the week-end

i

BILL DALEY
er-who bring a grin to Coach Bernie
Bierman's countenance every time
the Gopher backfield is brought into
a distussion. Jointly they give the
Golden Gophers the best two-man
combination at fullback since the duo
of Stan Kostka and Sheldon Beise
#rambled back in the national cham-
pionship days of 1934.
Valuable Combination
Like the Kostka-Beise team, the
present Gopher twosome provides a
valuable combination of talents. The
stocky Sweiger is a heavy duty bucker,
a terrific blocker and a great defen-
sive man. Daley is a gallopbr who is

with

a touchdown threat from any point
on the field.
When those few but vital yards are
necessary for a first down or a touch-
down, it is Sweiger who is the spec-
ialist at tucking the ball under his
arm, lowering his head and splitting
the close-knit defense of the oppo-
sition. Twice last season, the Minne-
sota senior bucked the line for touch-
downs, both against Northwestern.
Daley scored his first touchdown
last season on a one-foot line smash
after dashing 24 yards to put the ball
in scoring position against Nebraska.
Against Purdue later in the season,
he broke away for 35 yards to score.
Finally, the 200-pound junior wound
up with a touchdown from two yards
out against Wisconsin after he had
galloped 27 yards on an earlier play.
Differ In Play
Comparative records show the dif-
ferences between Sweiger's game and
that of Daley. The latter, with his
uncanny knack of breaking into the
open field, averaged 7.5 yards per
attempt to Sweiger's 4 yards per try.
When this season started, Bierman
shifttd Sweiger to the blocking back
and made Daley the regular fullback.
This combination worked out to al-
most-sheer perfection as is evidenced
by Minnesota's three smashing vic-
tories over Washington, Illinois and
Pitt.
In the last game-the Pitt battle-
Bomber Bill Daley was injured and
made it necessary for Sweiger to shift
back to his old position at fullback.
But no matter who is in the full-
back spot for the Golden Gophers
in Saturday's battle in the Stadium,
Minnesota has again lived up to one
of its old football traditions of" pro-
ducing some of the nation's best full-
backs.
BASKETBALL MANAGERS
Numerals and letter sweaters are
awarded to basketball managers.
"All eligible sophomores and sec-
ond semester freshmen interested
in trying out for basketball man-
agers, report to Sports Building
any Monday, Wednesday, or
Thursday at 7:15 p.m.
Bob Wallace, Senior Mgr.

Men are enthusiastic about
the smooth comfortable style
of Saffell & Bush Shirts
priced at $2.00 and $2.50.

aa wjd4G

4,
GREAT
WINNERS

R-H TOPCOATS
R-H OyERCOATS
R-H SUITS
MICHIGAN

Nunn Bush and Edgerton Shoes
. .. The ankle fashioned shoes
for men $6.50 to $11.50.
Be prepared for Minnesota and

Enjoy the Game Saturday in an R-H Suit, Topcoat or
Overcoat, and be on two winning sides.

You'd probably be willing to

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