100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-U

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a

War Refugee
Describes Trip
(Continued from Page 1)
given an ominous send-off when
they learned that shortly after their
sailing the port of Suez was hit by
one of the worst bombings since the
commencement of hostilities.
Just as the craft emerged from
the Red Sea, they learned that an
American boat had been sunk on
the course they had just traversed.
In the South Atlantic, a Nazi sub-
marine sank a freighter within dan-
gerous proximity of the fleeing Kaw-
sar. 'On board the jittery passengers
formed a committee of men to en-
force the blackout orders which the
inexperienced crew had failed to do.
The passengers, their numbers
now dwindled by those leaving the
ship, at earlier ports, seemed unable}
to shake off the premonition of ever-'
so-close danger even in the Carib-
bean: The Kawsar just missed get-
ting caught in a bad storm in that
area.
Even with the ship safely docked
at Hoboken, the distraught and
homesick passengers had more trou-
ble when the officials in charge of
entry forced them to stay on ship-
board until Monday.
As soon as Miss Jolliffe left thej
Kawsar, she-came to Ann Arbor to
visit her sister. She plans to go on
to Chicago to meet her parents and
then to settle into her old routine
teaching in a progressive Winnetka,
Ill., school.

Great Mechanized Battle Rages
NOV GOROD
Peipus
PS OVL.IItrnen VALDAI
PSKOV
VELIKIE
YYA Z A
SMOL ENSK F..
YEOREL
" BRYANSK :.OREL
GOM EL
0 100
MILES
In a great mechanized battle, Russia's central armies tried desper-
ately to stem German advances on Moscow. Soviet armies withdrew
from the important railway town of Orel. Nazis menaced Moscow with
two major salients, one operating from the vicinity of Vyazma, the oth-
er through Bryansk and to Orel. The Germans claimed that a solid
front had trapped several Red armies and "thoroughly shaken" Mos-
cow's outer defenses. Previous reports have indicated a possible Ger-
man move (white arrow) from the Leningrad area.

University Band Will Present [
'National Defense' Formations

Toledo Art Museum
To Present Concerts

Determined to secure again this
Year the title of "All-American
Band." the University Marching Band
under the direction of Prof. William
D. Revelli will present its "national
defense" formation between halves
at the Pitt game today.
Leading the band this week will be
Lynn Stedman. '45. who, along with
Jim Kennedy. '43, is drum-major of
the band this year. Although a new-
comer to the band, Stedman has al-
ready proven himself capable of lead-
ing the 128-piece marching organiza-
rion, having taken charge at the
Michigan State game two weeks ago.
Being a newcomer to Michigan,
however, doesn't mean being a new-r
corner to drum-majoring by any
Smeans, for Stedman won first place
in the Detroit City High School
Drum-Major contest this year and
also took a second place in the state:
contest this spring.
Furthering his experience, Sted-
man taught twirling for Professor
Revelli in his High School Band Clinic
classes during the summer, and ap-
peared with the CMTC band at Camp
Custer in the summer of 1940.
A trombone player as well as a
drum-major. Stedman used to strut
for his own Southeastern High School
band on Fridays, and then appear
with the MacKensie High School
band the following day.
Now sharing Michigan drum-major

____
1

honors with Kennedy on an alternat-
ing basis. Stedman had his first
chance with the Michigan band last
fall when he led the band for about
five minutes during one of their drills
at South Ferry Field.
Asked to comment on the band,
Stedman stated he was very happy
to be working with the Michigan
band, Professor Revelli and Jim Ken-
nedy, and that he hoped his small
contribution will help the band to
continue the success that it has
known in the past.
Following its usual procedure on
out-of-town games, the band will pre-
sent today's formations when it ap-
pears at the Northwestern game at
Evanston next Saturday.

Two concert series will be spon-
sored by the Toledo Museum of Art
during the 1941-42 season, with the
first program set for Wednesday. Oct.
29.
At that time the Philadelphia Sym-
phony Orchestra will appear with Eu-
gene Ormandy conducting. Later
events will include the Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra. Vladimer Horowitz.
the Minneapolis Symphony Orches-
tra. and a joint recital of Adolph
Busch. violinist, and Rudolf Serkin,
pianist.
Tickets for the two series may be
obtained from the Concert Ticket
Office, Toledo Museum of Art.
-~ -_---I

III

II
i

For FootbaI

I1

FOOD
Yes!
GOOD
FOOD
at
Marshall's
Phone 5933

Games.. .
U/se theewe,
BACK -SAVER
Attaches to your seat and makes
a comfortable chair out of a

I

hard bench. Easy
Lp like a cane.

to carry, folds
50c

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
TAILORING & SEWING WANTED TO BUY
STOCKWELL and Mosher-Jordan CASH for used clothing; men and
residents-Alterations on women's ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
garments promptly done. Opposite Main St. Phone 2-2736. 5c
Stockwell. Phone 2-2678. 3c MISCELLANEOUS
HELP WANTED,
MIMEOGRAPHING -Thesis bind-
COLLEGE GIRL-Room and board ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
exchanged for small service. No S. State,6c
children. Attractive room. CallW
3836. 54c WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-~
3836._54c_ Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
EXPERIENCED student counterman. Killins Gravel Company, phone
Hours, 9 to °12 in morning, Monday 7112. 7c
thru: Saturday. Apply 105 N. For-
est. ryc50 PUBLIC EVENING SCHOOL begins
Oct. 13, Monday evening. Enroll-
TYPIST-neat and rapid-tempor- ment at Ann Arbor High School.
ary work or as required. Prefer ' Recreation, business, language,
someone who does not want to English, speech, defense training,
work regularly. Write Box 23, woodworking, art, metalcraft, sew-
Michigan Daily. 51c ing, cooking and other courses will
TYPINGbe offered. For further informa-
TYP__ _ _G_ tion call 5797.
WILLING to do typing in the home. FOR RENT
Reasonable rates. Phone 2-1592.
Ask for Katherine. SINGLE on 1st floor across from
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal Engineering Bldg. on Church St.
typist, also mimeographing. Notary Phone 8935. 53c
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
ROOM ad BOARD FOR GRADUATE GIRLS: 2 singles,
ROOM_and_ BOARDwell-furnished, cross-draft, shower.
Quiet surroundings. Phone 6152.
STUDENTS! afternoons. 26c
Is your board bill worrying you?
Come on over to 608 Monroe and SUITE with private bath and shower
try Mrs. Jeffry's famous home- for 3 grad women. Also lovely stu-
cooked meals. Lunches and din- dio room for 2. Cooking and laun-
ners every day but Sunday. dry privileges if desired. Inquire
$4.20n422 E. Washington.
LAUNDERING
New oPening jLAUNDRY- 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c

Spanish Club Hears
DAI LY OFF IC IAL BULLET INMexican Travelogue
Mexico was the subject of an in-

Buy them at SLATER'S
and at the Stadium.

i

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1941
VOL. LIL No. 12
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices
Senate Reception: Since no indi-
vidual invitations are being sent, this
is a cordial invitation to all members
of the teaching staff and their wives
to be present at the Senate Recep-
tion to new members of the faculties
on Tuesday, November 4, in the ball-
room of the Michigan Union at 8:30
p.m. The reception will take place
from 8:30 to 10:00 o'clock, after
which there will be dancing from
10:00 to 12:00. It is especially hoped
that new teaching fellows and in-
structors may be present and the
chairmen of departments are asked to
be of assistance in bringing this
about.
Safety Warning: All pedestrians
are urged to keep out of the Uni-
versity driveways and parking places
except at regular sidewalk crossings.
A number of narrow escapes from
injuries have recently occurred. Side-
walks are provided for pedestrians.
The driveways bre for cars. It is not
only dangerous to walk in the drive-
ways but it is discourteous to motor-
ists who do not have access to the
sidewalks.
Pulitzer Prizes in Letter: A nomi-
nation form for the Pulitzer Prizes in
Letters has been received at the Presi-
dent's Office., The Prizes, in Letters
are for "novels, plays, histories, biog-
raphies and volumes of verse." Mem-
bers of the faculties who desire to
make nominations for these Prizes
may secure the official forms through
Dr. Frank E. Robbins, 1021 Angell
Hall.

cept during holiday periods, the teresting program presented at the
ept dring holidand eperiod t first meeting of La Sociedad Hispan-
Main Reading Room and the Periodi-a ica Thursday evening.
cal Room of the General Library are Caurs uletevennpesident of the
kept open from 2:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. . .
Books from other parts of the group, who visited in Mexico this
building which are needed for Sun- summer, gave a brief talk on his im-
iI ,will hnnlnhlipressions of the country. John Fal-

MICHIGAN

Matinee Today at
2:0A -4:00 P.M.
Adults 25c incl. tax

II

ay use willu e1 ma e ava ilaue in
the Main Reading Room if request
is made on Saturday to an assistant
in the reading room where the books
are usually shelved.
Warner G. Rice, Director
Graduate Students who expect to

conieri, '42, showed slides of Mexico,
and entertained La Sociedad with a
running commentary on his subject.
The officers for the coming year
are: Claude Hulet, '42, president;
Doreen Voiles, '42, vice-president;
Raymond Chambers, '42, treasurer;
Carmelita Rosasco, '42, secretary.

Iowa

receive degrees at the end of the cur--
rent semester are required to file for-
mal applications in the office of the Wesleyan Student Group
Graduate School. This should be done Will Hear Dr. VanKirk
early in the semester, preferably be-
fore the beginning of the third week, "The Spiritual Bases of an Endur-
in order to insure an adequate check. ing Peace" will be the subject of Dr.
If a student does not complete his Walter W. VanKirk of the Federal
work in the semester during which the Council of Churches in America, at
application is filed, it is necesary 10:40 a.m. tomorrow in the Method-
to renew the application early during ist Church.
(continued on Page 4) In addition, Dr. VanKirk will speak
at the Wesleyan Guild student meet-
Scientists Invited To Hear ing on "The Political and Economic
Outlines for the World of Tomor-
Special U.S.S.R. Broadcast row" at 6 p.m. in the church parlors.
In a letter addressed to scientists
throughout the world, the Academpy
of Sciences of the U.S.S.R. has invited
all men of science to listen to a short <
wave anti-Nazi broadcast by the
Academy Ito be heard in the United
States at 8 a.m. Sunday on .15.1 I
megacycles.
Signed by D. Chuvakhin, first sec-
retary of the Soviet Embassy in
Washington, letters have been re-
ceived by science professors on the
faculty.Y=
Pitkin Will Be Honored .
Recognized as a leader in the field
of psychology, Walter B. Pitkin, '00, is I
to be further recognized as an gut-
standing American by the publication
of a biographical sketch in the mag-
azine "Current Biography."

6F R f
E7A
Env

ALAN HALE
FRANK McHUGH
Directed by
Raoul Walsh
Extra
"DONALD'S CAMERA"
Evenings 36c plus 4c tax Walt Disney Cartoon
SUNDAY - "CITIZEN KANE"

.1

INDIVIDUALIZED LAUNDRY
SERVICE
Each bundle done separately,
by hand
No Markings
Silks, Wools, and Coeds' Laundry
Our Specialty
All our work is guaranteed
Free pick-ups and deliveries
SILVER LAUNDRY

Sunday Library Service: On all
Sundays from October to June, ex-

MiL

Somet'hing
to Look
Forward toff
Today, as it has for the past 51 years, THE
MICHIGAN DAILY contributes a major part
towards making each student's year at the Uni-
versity a full and happy one.
As the University has grown, the Daily has
followed in its footsteps and today brings all
the campus events of interest to its subscribers
-important events, many of which would
otherwise remain unheard of to University
students.

607 E. HOOVER

5594 1

I

I

'1

WEEK DAYS at 2-4-7-9 P.M.
LAST TIMES
TODAY!

:TI

Fraternities! Sororities! Independents!

Fac-

. ulty Members!-Once again the Daily is bring-
ing your news to you!
q ~Regular Full Year Subscription Rae ... $4
Regular Half Year Subscription Rate $2.25
Mail Subscription Rate . . . . . . . $5.00
The Michigan Daily

6

Also
MARCH OF TIME "NORWAY IN REVOLT"
CARTOON NEWS OF THE DAY
Comina Sisndav

I

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan