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October 05, 1941 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Dance Marks 'Double Ten Day'

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Phone 685n10nE sto Wingo
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Phone 2-2685 148 East Wash ngton

Anniversary
Brings Back
'Yesterdays'
(Continued from Page 1)
looked like nothing more than a
small farm.
It was surrounded by a fence and
the only entrance had posts placed
in it so that there was "room enough
between them for a man but not for
a cow." This last supposedly to -eep
wandering bossies from atempting to
obtain an education by appearing
suddenly at the window of a class-
room.
Other animals, long since relegated
to the barnyard, seem to have been
ather common around the campus
and they afforded the, students the
material for pranks and practical
jokes-which appear to have been as
iopular then as now.
Instead of tearing a local theatre
part, starting fires in the middle of
State Street or raising the Nazi swas-
ka on the flagpole, the pranksters
-f 1845 saw to it that geese and don-
keys appeared in unusual and prob-
ably embarrassing places. Once they
gven went to the trouble of setting
a ful wagon load of wood on the
roof of Mason Hall.
And thus, not so different after all
was the Class of 1845 from that of
1945. The Cain they raised probably
maused just as much of an uproar
then as a theatre-crashing party does
now. Of course, they may have been
a little more rugged, as Apparitions
I and II suggested. Perhaps they
did get up before dawh. But after all,
they didn't have-: any women around
to keep them up until dawn. Did
they?
Getoa
HEAD start '
in style this W
semester;

Welsh Miner
Will Describe
Labor Morale
The current Broadway character of
Welsh miner turned author will step
from the playbill to reality Thursday'
at 8:00 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Miner, novelist, and playwright,
Jack Jones will lecture here op "How
British Labor Views The War." His
talk, sponsored by the Ann Arbor
chapter of the Committee To Defend'
America, will inaugurate a program
of faculty and guest lecturers on
war and allied subjects.
As a representative of British mine
workers and an underground laborer
for twenty-six years, Jones has been
addressing audiences throughout
Great Britain since the opening of the
second World War. In the past he
has stressed labor's stake in the con-
flict, dispelling the "illusion of a
capitalists' war."
Jones' life and background pre-
sents a strange contrast to the aver-
age lecturer. Born in 1884, he worked
in the mines until 1914. With a
four-year hitch after the Boer War
on his record, Jones was called up as
a reservist and served another four
years in the army.

Although the crowds attending the
Michigan-Iowa tilt yesterday were
not as large as those at most of the
games, you wouldn't notice the dif-
ference from a look at the lounges
of the various dorms yesterday after-
noon.
Fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers
and "just friends" invaded the in-
ner sanctums of the houses in large
numbers for cider, coffee or tea
and crullers, cakes or cookies-or
just to rest their weary pedal ex-
tremities. For the heartier of the
sports fans, dancing was provided in
the radio rooms of several gals'
dorms.
A birthday greeting of a simple
kind of genius was the reason for
the barren walls in Stockwell Hall
Friday night. Some industrious well-
wishers searched the dorm from
stem to stern in quest of miniature
college banners which they used in
banger-writing HAPPY BIRTHDAY,
PHYL on the white walls of one
girl's room. Their efforts, which took
them a good four hours to complete,
were well rewarded by the praise of
their audience. IThey were even so
efficient they carried a little note-
"bhok arni u ith ther fnt Ann

Rain, coming down in bucketfuls
at the Michigan-Iowa thriller, con-1
tinued in the early evening-and most I
of the dorm residents spent a quiet
evening in their rooms listening to
the radio, playing classical records
or talking over the war situation.
The wet weather ruined many girl's
hair and caused them to hurry homeI
in order to look their best for an eve-
ning date.

news of the dorms
By GLORIA NISHON and BOB MANTHO

Airplane Drops Tail'
For Direct Advertising
Twenty-nine thousand, nine hun-
dred and nine football fans-yeste-
day's official attendance - roared
"You dropped something" to the little
man in the airplane who lost his
Detroit restaurants banner adver-
tisement while circling the stadium
during the game yesterday.
The banner, made of bunting, fell
on the home of Mr. Canby Dempsy,
311 Cook, who called the police to
report the addition to his back lawn.
No damage of any sort whatsoever-
to the Cook residence-was reported.

vL L I NIEIN S
j5or4.Ail// ccajioni
If it's linens you want, we' have them. Come in
a and see our complete assortment of both imported
and domestic linens, also bridge sets, handkerchefs
and head kerchiefs. These items are not on the
luxury tax list.
Gage Linen'Shop
IN THE ARCADE
h WAlvays Reasonably Priced"
I ; ? ::;;;;;y p ft,. };;;;;;;(} f)C f ;;;;;; yo (

N I

The post-war depression found who Princeton, Dartmouth or Kew
Jones unemployed, after several years ForineonDtor
spent as a representative-of his dis- belonged to.
trict's miners at conventions and Amazing the talents of dormers!
wage negotiations. Sporadic work-
gave Jones his first leisure time, and
he spent it reading.
Then, at the age of fifty, Jones
wrote his first novel, a realistic piece
about the people and area he had
known all his life. "Rhondda Round-
about" was composed on scrap paper
and old account books, but a London
house published it in 1934.
After another return to his work'
on roads and excavations,. Jones wrotel.
his second novel "Black Parade." Its
favorable reception induced him to
buy a' typewriter and the autobio-
graphical "Unfinished Journey" was
the result.

MICHIGAN
COEDS''
CHOOSE
JACOBSON's

SHAMPOO and SET
PERMANFENTS
$3:50 to $10

75c

"You'll enjoy our
complete service"
BEAUTY SHOP

530 South Forest

Ph. 2-4802

Jones' writing career was interrup-
ted by the war while he was finishing
a movie of "coal and song." With
four sons in the Empire forces, he has
assisted in civilian defense activities
in addition to his lecture tours.
Victor C. Vaughan's
Son Is Given Degree
Dr. Warren Taylor Vaughan, son
of the late Victor C. Vaughan, form-
er Dean of the Medical School, was
presented with an honorary degree
of Master of Science by President
Ruthven yesterday at the medical
school convocation.
The Sternberg Memorial Medal,
given annually to a student in the
Medical Scho'ol who has an out-
standing record in preventive medi-
cine, was awarded to Chris J. Zara-
fonetis, '41M, of Grand Rapids.
A graduate of the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts in
1913 and of the medical school in
1916, Dr. Vaughan has been engaged
since 1920 in practice in Richmond,
Va., and has been director, of the
Vaughan-Graham Clinic there.
Dr. Vaughan is editor-in-chief of
the Journal of Allergy and of the
Journal of Laboratory and Clinical
Medicine.

1 '

...and Have Registered at
JACOBSON'S for All,'The
Campus-Approved Style's

p

Sensa : ona

in Shoes

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A4 SEAL-FAST, brushed over polish
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S. SEAL-FAST helps protect your nails.
This sensational new product is a cl~ar
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nail polish. What you've wanted,
needed, hoped for -ever since your
first manicure.
600'

_.,. s

NATIONALLY ADVERTISED
f}.
49
///
95
The Latch String's out.to you Michigan Coeds!
It's ivy-clad tradition to come to Jacobson's for
those school-going, date-rating shoes! ALL
that's right for the fall and winter season is
here in PUMPS ... BOOMP TOE SPECS
. .. CASUALS . .. SANDALS. LO HEEL.
ERS. . . SPORTS!

Li

at

Cotton p.j.'s for bull sessions .
matching loungeable robe fdr date-
waiting or just pldying around. A
three piece apple print ensemble that
will be the apple of your eye.

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