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January 28, 1940 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-28

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N

JANUARY 28, 1941

THE MICHIGAN DILY

PAGE TTIT

.. ...... .. _ ..... .............. . .. _. . ..... _........ _ . .. . . ....... ...........,...... ..... . .................. ... . ..

" A s i a. 1

League Opens
Scholarships

I

3r' HIGH TIME!

To Petitioners
Junior Women May Submit
Applications For McCormick
Awards Today Through Friday
' Junior women interested in apply-
ing for one of the three $100 Ethel
McCormick scholarships offered each
year by the League may petition be-
ginning today through Friday in the
Undergraduate Office of the League.
In addition to junior standing, ap-
plicants must show participation in
extra-curricular activities under the
League merit system and show a 2.7
scholastic average. Questions on the
application blank will concern any
previous honors received and how the
individual's years in school have been
financed. Two letters of recommen-
"dation concerning the applicant's
life and character will also be re-
quested.
The Judiciary Council will inter-
view those who have petitioned by
appointment during the first part of
the second semester. The awards
winners will be announced at the an-
nual Installation Banquet held in
the spring.
The McCormick scholarship fund is
rsupported by the student activities of
the League, such as the Candy Booth.
Each class project contributes a large
part of- its earnings to this fund.
Freshman Project, Sophomore Caba-
ret, and Junior Girls Play are includ-
ed among these projects.
Each woman interviewed will be
asked to write a brief statement re-
garding her plans for the future and
what kind of work'she wishes to do
after completion of her college course.
The winners of the scholarships
last year were Doris Merker, '41, Jean
Maxted, '41, and Partricia Walpole,
'41.

Just because the PACI tea-dance Thursday afternoon was called!
"Finals Fling" doesn't mean that it was the last fling by any means, inI
fact the whole week-end was sort of characterized by a "flingish" attitude!
It lasted right up until Sunday night, too.
Even though the title of the PACI dance did infer
,,'.j +that we would start studying right after it, we stopped in
. for a while to see how things were going. Peg Browr,
Art Collin, Lew Fogel and Dick Molthop had every appear-
. ance of enjoying themselves no end, and just as we left
we caught sight of Barbara Johnson; Deana Stover and
Charlotte Thompson making quite a hit with the stag line!'
We Study.Hard!...
We studied hard and rested up that night so we'd be
all set to make the rounds Friday eve, but actually all we
did was to go to the Union and have one fine time. Jane Elspass, '40, wom-
:n's editor of the 'Ensian, was there with Dave Laing, '39. editor of the
Ensian, and Jay McCormic'k swirled Peg Martin around the dance floor with
a flourish! The music was pretty wonderful but we did have time to noticeI
Jicki Henry and Jack Adams discussing the merits of college life (?), and
here were Doris Arer, Larry Smith, Jane Pritchard and Gordon Hardy,
all doing a smooth rhumba.
Saturday night seemed to be the big night this week-end, even if we
.id have to be in an hour earlier than Friday. At the swimming meet, be-
tween splashes, we shouted hello to Anne Minckler gs
end Lowell Moss, who were sitting not far from
:ildred De Lee and Al Thomas, and we saw Bill",
Heyboer explaining about diving to Ginny Paterson.
After the meet we dropped in at the Union
.gain and who did we see but June Gustafson, Jack
Hooper, Nancy Griffin and Bob Findlayson swing-
ing out to "Beat Me, Mama!" Mary Hayden, Jim
Hynes, Martha Opsion and Mait Comb were taking
time out for a cigarette and a bit of conversation as we proceeded on our
way to the Chi Omega party.
We Reach hr Limit .
We decided that this party was to be our last for the evening and said
as much to Peggy Bancroft, Ray Pittman, Betty Jane Swift, and Bill Lap-
worth, who scoffed at us for being such weaklings. Virginia Fry and Harry
Hansen added their two cents worth, and Doris Van Vleck, Bob Borden,
Ginny Breretor and Bill Chamberlain seemed to be having such a good time
that they almost pepped us up, tired as we were.
After sleeping until noon Sunday, (no, we skipped
church this week), we felt like doing anything but
b' studying, so we hopped over to have dessert and coffee
'ith the Wyvern and Sphinx exchange dinner people.
The dinner was held at the Union, and Marney Gardner,
BettyFarriss, Jean Hubbard, Mary Gage and Harriet
Heames were having a spirited conversation with the
Sharemets, John and Gus, T-Bone Martin and Al Owens.
Now we are weeping salty tears because we have to study. We guess
everybody's it the same boat. though, so we'll sob a hearty "Good luck!"

SInterviewsTo Begin
For Luncheon Positions
Interviewing for Freshman Honor
Luncheon chairmanships will be held
from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. today in the
League, Annabel Van Winkle, '41,
president of Panhellenic. announced.
The luncheon wil be held the early
part of semester to honor the fresh-
men from each sorority house on
campus who received the best grades
in her pledge class this semester.
Petitioning was held last week and
was open to only sophomore and jun-
ior delegates of Panhellenic. The lun-
cheon is an annual affair.

Heading the list of patrons for Ca-
duceus, medical ball to be held Feb.
21 in the Union Ballroom, are Pres-
ident and Mrs. Ruthven. Dean and
Mrs. Joseph A. Bursley, Dean and
Mrs. Walter B. Rea, and Dean and
Mrs. Albert C. Furstenberg.
The list continues with Dr. and
Mrs. John Alexander. Dr. and Mrs.
Carl E. Badgley, Dr. and Mrs. James
D. Bruce, Dr. and Mrs. Carl 0. Camp,
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Coller, Dr.
and Mrs. Charles W. Edmunds, Dr.
and Mrs. F. Bruce Fralick, and Dr.
and Mrs. Robert Gesell.

Others are Dr. and Mrs. Harley A.
Haynes, Dr. and Mrs. Fred J. Hodges,
Dr. and Mrs. Vincent C. Johnson. Dr.
and Mrs. A. C. Kirlikowski, Dr. and
Mrs. Norman R. Kretzchmar, Dr. and
Mrs. Howard B. Lewis. Dr. and Mrs.
Walter G. Maddock. and Dr. and
Mrs. Rollo E. McCotter.
Among the patrons will also be Dr.
and Mrs. Charles F. McKhanne Dr.
and Mrs. Norman F. Miller. Dr. and
Mrs. Reed Nesbit, Dr. and Mrs. Louis
H. Newburgh. Dr. and Mrs. Frederick
G. Novy, Dr. and Mrs. Bradley M.

Caduceus Patrons Are Listed

Pati en. Di'. and Ms. Ma. M. £ee (,
arid D l. and Mrs. Marvin Pollard.
The list ('ontilmes with Dr. and
Mrs. Malclm 1. Soule. Dr. and Mrs.
Cyrus C. Sturgis, Dr. and Mrs. John
Sundwall. Dr. and Mrs. Raymond W.
Waggoner. Dr. and Mrs. Carl V. Well-
er. Dr. and Mrs. Udo J. Wile and Dr.
and Mrs. Frank N. Wilson.
The annual Caduceus Ball is spon-
sored by Galens Honorary Medical
Society, and co-chairmen of the af-
fair this year are Robert Christensen,
'41M, and John McNicholas, '41M.

1.

Highlights from GOODYEAR'S
YEAR-END and AFTER-INVENTORY

(DOWNTOWN
STORE)

CLEARANCE

SALES

In Progress Through Friday, January 31st
All Sales Final . . . No Returns, Exchanges; Telephone Orders or C.O.D.'s

SPECIAL SALE
NYLON IRREGULARS

From
nylon

one of our regular hosiery makers,
stockings that have not passed rigid

tests imposed
imperfections
cases, these;
value.

by the
scarcely
stockings

manufacturer. The
discernible in most
represent excellent

1.00
pr.

Tailored Dress
Adds 'Pick-Up'
To Wardrobe

ALL SALES MUST BE FINAL

After-Inventory Clearance of
Daytime Dresses
998and
Misses' and Women's Sizes
Half Sizes Included.;
Exceptional values in dresses for afternoon and all-occa-
sion wear. Rayon crepes in simple, basic styles, or with
bead and metal embroidery trim . . . tailored and dress-
maker type wools .. , rich-looking novelty fabrics. Black
and colors.
Just 18 Beautiful Fur Coats
At After-inventory Clearance Prices

Clearance In The Sports Shop
Winter Sports Clothes
20% Less

If you are tired of wearing the
perennial sweater and skirt to classes
day in and day out, or if yau waut
to give. your wardrobe a mid-winter
"pick-up," add a simply tailored dress
or two to your collection of clothes for
everyday.
They will come in particularly
handy if you want to look well-
groomed for a luncheon, coke, or din-
ner date and haven't time to change
after class.
The type of dress you will choose
for classes should be - of a material
that ,will stand wear, and of shades
that wil not soil too easily. It must
stand frequent cleaning but mostim-
portant of all. the drest should bej
tailored.j
During the last few years, fashion
designers have created a good many
types of clothes appropriate for this
purpose. In addition to wool, they
have chosen material such as cord-
uroy, and jersey. The dresses may be
one or two piece affairs, plain or of
solid colors. Many give the proper
"school-girl" effect with immaculate
white collars and cuffs.
One particularly good model for
this in-between season is in a light
green shade, satisfying the trend to-
wards pastels so much in evidence
during January and February. It is
made shirt-waist style with long
sleeves and a V-neck.
Committees To Meet
Three JGP committees-finance,
tickets and publicity-will all hold
their meetings today at 5 p.m. in the
League.

I

Month-End'
BECAUSE-It is our policy to close out all merchandise at
the end of every season.
BECAUSE-Early Spring fashions are claiming our floor
space and our attention.
BECAUSE-We have marked down all our remaining winter
apparel for .. .
IMMEDIATE DISPOSAL
Regardless of Former Price or Cost
DRESSES
Crepes - Wools -Velveteens - Velvets

I

12
19
16

Ski Suits . . . . Formerly 10.95
Skating Dresses . . Formerly 7.95
Separate Sports Jackets
... ...Formerly 3.951

to
to

25.00
22.95

to 12.95

1 5 Separate Ski Trousers
8 Skating Skirts . . .

I

I

Formerly 6.50 to 10.95
Formerly 5.00 to 7.95

babardines, wools, airplane cloths and poplins
in well-designed functional styles. Misses' sizes.
10 Tyrolean Sweaters
20% Less
Were 3.95 to 10.95

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
2
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1

Fischer-Blend Raccoon. Size 14............Now
Mink-Blend Muskrat. Size 16..............Now
Hudson Seals. Sizes 12 and 16.............Now
Fitted Black Caracul. Size 16............. Now
Select Ocelot. Size 12...................... Now
Mink-Blend Muskrats. Sizes 11, 13, 14.......Now
Natural Silver Muskrats. Sizes 12 and 13. . . Now
Ocelot. Junior Size 11.....................Now
Grey Persian Paw. Size 14................Now
Grey Kidskin Coat. Size 14...............Now
Sable-Dyed Australian Opossum. Size 14...No w
Black Lapins. Sizes 12 and 16.............Now
Grey Caracul Jacket. Size .................Now
After-Inventory Special
LASKIN MOUTON JACKETS
3 at 25.00 ea.Sizes 12, 14, 16
1 at 35.00 ea. Size 16 w

200.00
150,00
156.00
150.00
150.00
125.00
125,00
125.00
125.00
125.00
100.00
39:98
39.98

i

Warm
yellow.
colors.

novelty knit sweaters in bright red, blue, green,
or white. Gaily embroidered designs in contrasting
Cardigan-types with metal buttons.

$5

$10

$15

I

Casual, dressy and formal styles in sizes 11 to 17, and 12 to
44. Former values to $39.75.
VERY SPECIAL GROUP OF WOOLS . . . $2.98

Evening "Separates"
1/2 Price
Blouses . . . Skirts . . . Sweaters
Were 6.50 to 15.00
Blouses in lame, chiffon and rich novelty fabrics; long
and short-sleeved sweaters with sequin and metal em-
broidery trim. All skirts of black velvet. Misses' sizes.
17 Youthful
Untrimmed Coats

I s

I

I

COATS
Casuals - Reefers
Tweeds, camelhairs and shetlands ... also 6 fur
Sizes 10 to 42.

In the French Room, Clearance of
Daytime Dresses
Dinner Dresses and
Form als
Women's and Misses' Sizes
and2498
Substantial end-of-the-season reductions on dresses in
the season's newest styles. Fine quality rayon crepes and
novelty fabrics. Many with rich bead embroidery or metal
trim. Others in simple, untrimmed styles of excellent
lines. Black and colors.
DRESSES-THIRD FLOOR
Fur-Trimmed Coats
at End-of-the;Season Savings

trimmed coats.

Reefers .. .
Man-Tailoreds

12.9

FOR THE
THAT'S
HARD TO FIND
May we show you
our selection of ...
terling Pieces. . 1.50 up
Clocks . ... ..2.95 up

i

$7

$10

$15

Included in the group are natural fabrics, monotone
tweeds in black, wine, blue or brown and a few tweed
mixtures. Youthful styles. Lined and interlined.

($16.95-$39.95 Values)

16"Sweaters
18 Blouses

Now 3.98

REVERSIBLES
Corduroys - Shetlands
$7 $10O
5 Reversibles, 3/4 length
85
(Sizes 10-18)
3 PC, SUITS
were $29.95
(Sizes 12, 14, 16)
Gloves, Blouses, Jewelry
5Oc

2 PC. SUITS
5 47
Values to $16.95
(Sizes 10-18)
HOUSECOATS
ROBES
2.95 85
Values to $10.95
(Sizes 12-40)
ODDS and ENDS
Blouses, Sweaters, Skirts,
Purses, Gloves, Jewelry
$1 -2

From a better group drastically reduced for immediate
clearance. Classic pullovers and cardigan sweaters.
Blouses in tailored and dressmaker types; rayon and
pure-dye silks.
21 SKIRTS and PINAFORES
Now 2.98 each
Wools in plain colors, plaids and tweed mixtures. Included
are styles with button-on pinafore bibs.
IN THE SHOE SALON
Remaining Stock of
Fall and Winer Shoes

39.98

and 59.8

Just 46 coats, but every one a masterpiece of style and beauty
that will endure for seasons to come. Fine quality wools in
smooth and novelty wools. Handsome fur, trims. All with
well-tailored linings and warm inter-linings. Black, brown,
a few colors.
Persian Lamb - Silver Fox - Mink - Dyed:Fitch
Kolinsky - Dyed Fox - Raccoon
37 Untrimmed Coats

Fountain' Pen S
Bracelets ..
Pins . . .

Sets .. .
3.95 up
2.00 up
2.00 up

IiII

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