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January 26, 1940 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-26

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 1941

n

Lloyd Asks New 'Quiet' System

Union, League
T ( k

Maintaining that quiet was one of
the most necessary requisites for
study, Dean Alice C. Lloyd suggested
yesterday that during the three week
period beginning today and until the
end of the examination period all
dormitories, sororities and league
houses inaugurate a new system of
quiet.
Her suggestion is especially not to
have any loud talking after eleven
o'clock, in addition to continuou,4
quiet hours during the day.
"It has been my observation," said

Dean Lloyd, "after watching

Uni-

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versity life for a considerable time,
that noise is one of the most serious
problems in all our houses, dormi-
tories, sororities, and league houses.
Because we are now approaching
examinations. I am going to make
a suggestion which may or may not
be accepted by individual houses for
the coming three weeks; namely, that
after eleven o'clock no one in the
house speak out loud. It is of great-
est importance that the right to
study and the right to sleep be pro-
tected in the coming weeks. I leave
it to the individual houses to put
this suggestion into effect."
Dean Lloyd stressed that this wasS
mei ely in the form of a suggestion
and was not mandatory on the part'
of any group on campus. She pointed
out that the plan has worked out
very well at Vassar College where
throughout the year the plan is in
effect. At first, it may be rather dif-
ficult to become used to whispering
after eleven, Dean Lloyd said, but
if everyone makes a genuine and
conscious effort in the beginning, the
end results will be gratifying to ev-
eryone.

F
I
re
Fe
M
Le
by
S'4
Im
th
th
th
of
no
as
wi
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th
de

Market Feb. 6
our Students Will Direct

War Library
Isit NwOpen
For'Research
The Broadman Library of World

Cinema Group
Books Picture
Of'World War
'The Big Parade' To Star

R esale And Purchase War and Post Wardom history locat- Gilberi And Summerville
f ( ,e ok' in New York is now open for re-
01' Used Tiextbookis search. according to a recent an- Here Sunday, Feb. 2
nouncement by Dr. Joseph Boardman,
The Student Book Exchange will founder of the library. The famous World War I picture,
-open for business on Thursday, Heretofore the collection of Ameri- "The Big Parade", will be shown here
cbruary 6. in the lobbies of the can and foreign news accounts, edi- at 8:30 p.m. next Sunday in the
ichigan Union and M i c h i g a n torial comments and broadsides has Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre by the
ague, it was announced yesterday been accessible only to students of Art Cinema League, as the third in
students directors Bob Samuels, the war period by special invitation. their series of outstanding films of
2, of the Union staff, Barbara Ditt- But because Dr. Broadman believes the past.
an, '41. and Beth Cartor. 41. of that "here and in the European con- The late John Gilbert stars in the
e League. flict problems are being raised, ques- movie which also features the well-
The Book Exchange is sponsored by tions are being asked which are strik- known comedian, Slim Summerville,
e Union and League to help ease ingly parallel to those of the World and a cast of actors considered "all-
e impact on students' pocketbooks War period. It is my hope that by star" in the 1930's. The picture, a
next semester's textbooks. It is a making the library available for re- sound-wired production, will be sup-
)n-profit organization which serves .search, we can by some small degree plemented by selected short subjects.
> a clearing-house for those who benefit from the mistakes and The picture's plot concerns a group
sh to buy or sell textbooks. achievements of the past," he has de- of soldiers in the last major war,
For the first time in its history cided to open the library's facilities their philosophies, their military life.
e Exchange will be located at both to research. th t exception osGibe
e Union and League lobbies. "As the Bulked together, the library weighs For may osf the tring h int
mand hs nv ' 7 ded reat almost 5Big Parade" was the starting pose sa's
=man lea glw w Pxy~n~ri rps~iv a mos 50 ons.sinc 75 scr n bo ks -1 --- __-_. , ~----_- -_ ----_-- ---

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MICHGAuN
% t ,.onEEY a EVERY1.OP
~ xa~e skiy p sto glory wPi'I
%ttingSquadron Egh '~
"'" e, c 01caysO merica's mfight y flee "

I

#

OPENS FRIDAY, Jonuary 31st
THREE SHOWS DAILY at 12:15 - 4:10 - 8:00 P.M.
* ,
4..... .

the supply, the added convenience
of two locations is expected to en-
large the turnover of the Book Ex-
change by making it easier for stu-
dents to turn in their books to be
sold at their own price," Samuels
l explained. The Exchange handled
over 5,000 textbooks last semester.
The Exchange will remain open
through Wednesday, February 19, -
the first Wednesday of the second
semester. From February 6 through
February 11 the Exchange will be
open from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at both
locations.
Several new conveniences and im-
provements' in handling the books
will be introduced this semester, the
directors said. A new system of ac-
counting will make it easier for stu-
dents to deposit books with the Ex-
change and to claim any unsold
books. A complete list of books re-
quired for all Literary and Engineer-
ing College courses will be available
at the Exchange, and the staff
will give price advice to any stu-
dent depositing books.
Graduate Club To Meet
Graduate Outing Club will meet
at 2:30 p.m. today at the Rackham
Building for a hike in the vicinity
of Ann Arbor or skating at the Coli-
seum. An informal supper will bel
served at Rackham following these
events.

c11V3UO VI, p ;ttv:lIuju V1
contain the editorial comments alone
and there are 40 complete files of
American and foreign newspapers
comprised in the collection. Also in-
cluded in the studies of the period
are letters-to-the-editor, mounted in
volumes, posters and cartoons. The
collection contains altogether 500,000
items.
Forestry Club
BeinsWork
On Yearbook

of successful Hollywood careers, since
it was considered one of the best
pictures of that year.
The last film in the league's series
will be "Little Caesar," the famous
gangster picture starring Edward G.
Robinson. Albert Stutz, Grad., man-
ager of the Art Cinema group, has
also announced that series ticket'
holders may be allowed to see a fifth
picture in the series free of charge.
---

I

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Work on the 1941 edition of the
Michigan Forester, yearbook of the
School of Forestry and Conservation
published by the Forestry Club, is
already under way, according to
Gordon L. Watts. '41F&C, and
Chester J. Ewing, '42F&C, editor and
business manager respectively.
Prof. L. S. Ramsdell of the forestry
school is faculty adviser, although the
publication work is done almost en-
tirely by the student foresters.
Forester, An Old Publication
The Forester is not a newcomer to
the campus. It had its origin before
forestry was established as a separate
school in the University, although
publication was suspended for sev-
eral years while the change was being
made.
One of the features of the book is
its alumni directory, giving the busi-
ness addresses of all graduates of
the school. Since the field of forest
and conservation necessitates fre-
quent changes of address, this an-
nual directory is invaluable in keep-
ing alumni of the school, all of whom
receive the Forester, in contact with
each other.
Graduates Write Articles
Two or three technical articles
written by graduate foresters now in
the field wil be included. The nature
of these articles is not yet definite,
Watts said.
Norman M. Reid, Grad., and Har-
ry S. Mosebrook, '41F&C, will con-
tribute an article on the 1940 Alas-
kan Expedition. William E. Pelley,
'42F&C, Neal G. Sperlake, '42F&C,
and Henry H. Carpenter, '42F&C, will
describe the accomplishnients of the
past summer at Camp Filibert Roth.
Photographs of the forestry sen-
iors will also be included. This work
will be supervised by Frank L. Hag-
gerty, '41F&C. James P. Gilligan,
SpecF&C, is in charge of other photo-
graphic work.
William K. Ferrell, '41F&C, will
write on Forestry Club athletics of the
past year, and James W. Maddox,
'41F&C, will be in charge of art
work. The date for publication has
been set for May 1.

Extra
Newest Color Cartoon "FIRE CHIEF"

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