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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 22, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHTICAN DAILV

WEDNF.RT)AV- JAVTTAIPV *9. ItkAl

Sascha Jacobson
Plays Here Friday
In Musical Quartet
Sascha Jacobsen, first violinist of
the Musical Art Quintet, which will
be heard here Friday and Saturday
in the lecture hall of the Rackham
Building, has been intimately con-
nected with music since his early
childhood.
Born in Helsingford, Finland, Mr.
Jacobsen nevertheless considers him-
self a Russian by origin. His family
itself was extremely musical, his
father being a 'cdllist and many of his
forebears having played one ora
another musical instrument.
When he was still caite young,
the Jacobsen family moved to Pet-
rograd where he studied under Leo-
pold Auer, then considered the world's
greatest violin teacher. Mr. Jacobsen
showed himself to be a child prodigy
and at the age of eight was already
well-known in musical circles.
Tickets for the three concerts here
are on sale at the present time in
the offices of the University Musical
Society in the Carrillon Tower. Tick-
ets for the entire series are two dol-
lars while tickets for individual per-
formances are one dollar.

.. . ... . .. as yr i 1 .aaX'i i/ _ . _ s aWunrallr d A i T A'Tt A Xr 7 00 4 A
.. U ' .P~~ ~ ~ . ~I

L

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
February 1 to February 12, 1941
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the Time of
Exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
having quizzes only, the Time of Exercise is the time of the first quiz
period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued though the exam-
ination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such work
during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflict between assigned examina-
tion periods should be reported for adjustment to Professor D. W.
McCready, Room 3209 East Engineering Building, before January 29.
To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each student should receive
notification from his instructor of the time and place of his appear-
ance in each course during the period February 1 to February 12.
No single course is permitted more than four hours of examination.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of the
Classification Committee.

I

INA UG URA TION

HIGHLIGHTS

TIME OF EXERCISE

TIME OF EXAMINATION

MONDAY

1,

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

at 8

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
WANTED TO BUY-4
WANTED - J-Hop ticket.,A Phone
2-2521 ext. 315 between 10:00 a.m.
and 5:00 p.m. 228
WANTED-Lecture notes on English
history from 1660. Must be well
done-Graduate notes preferred.
Will pay liberally-Reply Box 11.
Give full details. 220
WANTED-Lecture notes on Modern
European Government. Must be
well done. Will pay liberally.
Graduate notes preferred. Reply
Box 12. Give full details. 219
TAILORING & PRESSING-12
SEWING-Alterations on coats and
dresses. Relining. Phone 2-2678.
Opposite Stockwell Hall. 206
DAYTIME and evening gowns made
and remodeled. Expert design and
workmanship. Phone 3468. 160
DRESSMAKING and alterations.,
Coats relined. Also sewing of all
kinds. Call Mrs. Ream, 8653. 208
MISCELLANEOUS-20 I
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 So.
State. 19
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins- Gravel Company, Phone
7112.5Sc
LAUNDERING - 9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
TYPING-18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN- Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
EXPERT TYPING-M. A. in Eng-
lish. Work guaranteed; reasonable
rates. Mrs. Walsh or Eley, 2-4108.
205
TYPING and duplicating service.
Dorothy Testa M.A., 625 E. Liber-
ty (at State), Rm. 1. 2-1835. Re-
ports, theses, dissertations, briefs.
22c
FOR RENT
DOUBLE or SINGLE ROOM. Across
from Law School. 718 Monroe.
dall 9850. 223
FOR RENT-Double and single
rooins. Very warm and very rea-
sonable. 608 Monroe. 226
DOUBLE-Spring Term. $3 per
man. Only 3 students in house.
1209 Cambridge Ct. 2-1359. 224
NICE ROOMS for students or young
business people. Quiet home. Close
to campus. 428 Cross St., 2-4888.
227
FOR RENT-Engineering student
wants room-mate; also single room
across from Art School. 912 Mon-
roe St., Phone 8741. 225
LARGE airy rooms looking out on
spacious grounds are available in
Ives Woods residence near bus
line. Private entrance and bath
for roomers. Phone 9710. 218

FOR RENT-Rooms for teachers,
graduate or business women; cook-
ing and laundry facilities if de-
sired. 426 Washington; call at 422.
Phone 8544. 211
TA 2.4- i lfl ldMT2TfTipfl 7,f'%1-%AXtC 1LC -

TUESDAY

1

at
at
at
at
at
at

9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday, Feb. 10
Friday, Feb. 7
Wednesday, Feb. 5
Monday, Feb. 3
Monday, Feb. 3
Tuesday, Feb. 11
Tuesday, Feb. 11
Monday, Feb. 10
Tuesday, Feb. 4
Tuesday, Feb. 4
Wednesday, Feb. 5
Wednesday, Feb. 12
Friday, Feb. 7
Thursday, Feb. 6
Saturday, Feb. 8
* Saturday, Feb. 1
*Thursday, Feb. 6
*Saturday, Feb. 8
*Thursday, Feb. 6
*Friday, Feb. 7
*Tuesday, Feb. 11

8-12
8-12
8-12
8-12
2-6
2-6
8-12
2-6
2-6
8-12
2-6
8-12
2-6
8-12
8-12
2-6
2-6
2-6
8-12
2-6
8-12

E.M. 1, 2; C.E. 2; German; Spanish
Surv. 1, 2 ,4; French
M.E. 3; Draw. 1, 2
Met. Proc. 2, 3, 4
Economics 53
E.E. 2a; Physics 46
Drawing 3

ROOSEVELT TAKES OATH>AS FIRST THIRD-TERM PRESIDENI --Before a crowd estimated at 75,000 persons, President Roosevelt took
the oath of office Monday as the first third-term president in the history of the United States from Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes. At right is
the President's eldest son, James, in a marine uniform. Holding the bible is Elmore Cropley, clerk of the Supreme Court.

*This may be used as an irregular period provided there is no con-
flict with the regular schedule above.
Prof. Davis Explains Functions
Of Local Draft Service Board

Editor's Note This is the first of a
seiof articles written with the co-
operation of Prof. Charles M. Davis of
the geography department on "The
Selective Service and the University."
Today's article deals with the Uni-i
versity draft service board and its
function.
By A. P. BLAUSTEIN
Between 15 and 20 University stu-
dents a day have been telephoning
and visiting the offices of Prof.
Charles M. Davis of the geography
department during the past few
weeks for the purpose of receiving
advice on their relation to the nation-
al draft law.
At the same time menbers of the
faculty between the ages of 21 and 36
have been receiving similar advice
from Dr. Louis A. Hopkins, director
of the Summer Session, who has been
appointed to head the University's
draft service board.
The purpose of the board is two-
fold. It is designed to help the stu-
dents and faculty solve their' nj
vichal problems and answe all of
tl'e questions w hich they my ra se,
d it is designed to aid in tae iela-
tionshir which are being mnaiata ined
betwee. the draftees and their local
registfratin boards.
Three gunral types of questions.
all of which will be described in more
detail in other articles in this series,
have been asked by students to date.
The first of these concerns the
actual operation of the selective ser-
vice law and the position of the stu-
dent under its provisions. The second'
deals with the problems involved in
the filing out of the questionnaires
received by c:aftees and the tcitd
deals with t!:. various personal con:-
siderations.
As an additional service to both
students and members of the faculty,
Bertha Beck, an assistant in Dr. Hop-
kins' Summerr Session office, has

been made a notary and will notarize
all questionnaires free of charge.
The selective service advice board
here was formed shortly after Christ-
mas vacation purely as an aid to
University members in need of regis-
tration advice. Both Dr. Hopkins and
Professor Davis, who is a reserve of-
ficer in the United States Army have
acquainted themselves with the gov-
ernment's rules and regulations and,
through experience, have come to
know many of the peculiarities of
local draft boards throughout the
nation.
"The Position of the Student
Under the National Draft Law" will
be discussed in a subsequent article.
Rifle Team Loses
First Big Ten Tilt
To Illinois Squad
Big Ten competition served warn-
ing to the University Rifle Team
yesterday when it was determined
that the squad had lost its opening
match with the University of Illinois
1825 to 1834.
In spite of the fact that ths team
shot one of the lowest scores of the
year, the Illini margin was still only
nine points Only three other schools
reporting this week, Indiana, Icwa,
and Minnesota, reported scores above
that, while three more, Purdue, Chi-
cago and N rthwestern, fell below the
Michigan mark. Wisconsin alid Ohio
drew byes in the first round.
During the turse of the matcb: ;
each school will shoot against each
other schcoi at -ast once. This bemg
but the first round, Michigan >.tit
has a full chance to takin. the
champion ship ; .cm Minnesota, whoe
team has won it "or seven s5:i ht
years.

*

REPRESENTS MICHIGAN-
And in the stands behind Roose-
velt sat Murray D. Van Wagoner,
Michigan's newly-elected governor.

GARNER INDUCTS HENRY WALLACE INTO VICE-PRESIDENCY'-Vice-President John N. Garner
ended a 38-year Congressional career when he administered the oath of office to his successor, Henry A.
Wallace, former secretary of agriculture. Left to right ou the inaugural stand: Wallace, President Roose-
velt, James Roosevelt and Garner.

i

,-_ _

- M

n>;

A Michigan Dairy

Classified Ad reaches 10,000
prospects for only 36c. Try
and today -- we know it will

ADMINISTERS OATH,- Chief
Justice Charles Evans Hughes ad-
ministered the presidential oath to
Franklin D. Roosevelt for the
third time Monday.

bring results.

I m®w ye It 1~. w *

.........

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