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January 15, 1940 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-15

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1941

PAGE SIX 1itflNESDAY, JANUARY 15, 1941
_____________________________________________________________________________________________ I

news of the dorms
By GLORIA NISHON and DAVE LACHENBRUCH

In the men's dorms, 1940 saw manyj
changes and innovations. Most spec-
tacular, of course, were the new
buildings.
Before September, 1939, fewer than
200 University men lived in the two
residence halls, Fletcher Hall and
Allen-Rumsey House, which offered
the only dormitory facilities for un-
dergraduate men. In September 1939,
seven other houses of the West Quad-
rangle plus Victor Vaughan House,
medical dormitory were opened, in-
creasing the residence halls' enroll-
ment to more than one thousand.
In October of this year the last
link in the chain of residence fa-
cilities for men was opened - the
East Quadrangle, located on East
University Avenue, across the street
from the University High School.
It is still the campus' newest build-.
ing, and is "home sweet home" to
400 male students. The new hall
consists of four separate and dis-
tinct units, housed in one large
building. The units are named after

DIRECTORY

t

TAILORING & PRESSING-12l
LADIES' TAILORING-Suits and
coats made and remodeled. Ex-
pert design and workmanship.
Phone 3468. - 160
HEATING and PLUMBING
STOKER and oil burner repair and
replacements. 30-day special. Al
Root Heating Service, 2-3518. 21c
FOR SALE
COMPLETE SET of SS White,
Black's instruments, Prosthetic
equipment for school, Dental text
books. Owner a '39 graduate and
now a naval officer. Write R. M.
Reynolds, Farley Road, Pinckney,
Mich. 180
ROOM and BOARD
ROOM and BOARD or board for1
either reformed or orthodox Jew-
ish girls. Phone 6232.
TYPING--18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
EXPERT TYPING by M. A. in Eng-
'lish. All work guaranteed-Rea-
sonable rates-call Mrs. Walsh or
Mrs. Eley, 2-4108. 186
TYPING and duplicating service.
Dorothy Testa, M.A., 625 E. Liber-
ty (at State), Rm. 1. 2-1835. Re-
ports, theses, dissertations, briefs.
22c
FOR RENTT
PLEASANT, well-located rooms-
$2.50 and $3. Suite $2.50 each.
904 S. State. Phone 4685. 192
SECOND SEMESTER-Two com-
fortable inexpensive quiet rooms;
for men. 930 Dewey-Phone 7319.
197
FOR RENT-Single room for grad-
uate girl. First floor. I/2 block
from Campus. 725 Haven; Phone
5938. 195
REASONABLE-2 suites, 1 single,
opposite Mich. League. Approved
for men students. 220 S. Ingalls
St. 196
LARGE DOUBLE ROOMS-Steam
heat-continuous hot water-plea-
sant furnishings-excellent loca-
tion-$3.00--phone 2-3776--417 E.
Liberty. 198
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS for
teachers, graduate, or business
women. Laundry and cooking fa-
cilities if desired. 426 E. Washing-
ton, call at 422 or phone 8544. 187
VERY LOVELY furished two or
three room suite with bath, con-
stant hot water, fireplace, 'oil
steam heat. First floor, for 3 or 4
graduate students or business
women. No smoking. Also suite
or doubles second floor for work-
board or room, board and wages.
928 Church St., phone 3155. 199
LAUNDERING -9

former instructors in the Univer-
sity - Prescott, Greene, Tyler and
Hinsdale Houses, and each one has
its own separate self-governing
systems. They're all for undergrad-
uates except Hinsdale, which
houses 95 graduate and profession-a
al students.
Also new in 1940 is the Chief Resi-
dent Adviser system. Heretofore, each
house (Wenley, Allen-Rumsey, Lloyd,
etc.) has had its own resident ad-
viser, a faculty man. Last year, in
addition, a chief residentadviser was
appointed for each housing unit
(East Quadrangle, West Quadangle)
to supervise personnel. Prof. Joseph
E. Kallenbach of the Political Science
department is the East Quad Chief
and Mr. Charles Peake of the English
department fills the same position in
the West Quad. This system pro-
vides more unity between the houses
of each quadrangle.
Both Quadrangles entered the'
fields of news writing during '40,
the East Quad with its "East Wind"
and the West Quadrangle with
"The Spectator," both of which
contain student-written news, edi-
torials, gossip and cartoons.
The University, in October, opened
a branch library, the freshman study
hall, in the West Quadrangle, con-
taining many reference works re-
quired for freshman courses, thus re-
lieving a considerable amount of con-
gestion in the main libraries and
enabling dorm freshmen to do much
of their studying at home.
Early in the semester the nightly
Louis A. Strauss memorial record
concerts were held in Strauss li-
brary of West Quadrangle, as trib-
ute to the late Professor Strauss of
the English department. These
ccncrts proved so popular that
they were moved to the r~ain
lounge, and since have become a
regular after-dinner habitof many
of the men in the quad.
The East Quad, too, has a musit
appreciation hour - theirs is given
semi-weekly in the Greene House
Lounge. Programs for this hour, to-
gether with comments, are publishedi
weekly in the "East Wind."
.add to the above the usual
social activities, clubs and elec-
tions, and that's 1940 in the dorms.
Teac her Group
To Meet Here
Conference Will Feature
Educational Research
Teachers, education students,
school administrators will convene
for the Third Annual Conference on
Instructional and Curriculum Prob-
lems Saturday in the University
Elementary and High schools.
The program will feature current
research under way in classes in ed-
ucation. The series of, roundtables
will be conducted by members of ihe
School of Education Faculty at 8:30
a.m., 10 a.m. and 11:30, a.m.
Prof. Haywood Keniston of the
frbrance languages department, will
speak on "Some Basic Assumptions
of Current Educational Theory" at

Alumni Groups
To Hold State
Conclave Here"
Dr. Ruthven Will Welcome 4
Delegates To Convention
Opening Friday In Union
1
University of Michigan Alumni f
clubs from all over Michigan will a
send representatives to the first an- l
nual statewide convention to be heldt
Friday, Jan. 17, in the Union.
More than 30 alumni clubs repre-
sented by from 50 to 70 :members
and officers will attend the conven-
tion, Mr. T. Hawley Tapping, Gen-
eral Executive Secretary of the
Alumni Association said yesterday.
The members attending will be
welcomed by President Alexander
Ruthven at 2 p.m. when they gather
for the first meeting.
During the afternoon a tour of
the campus will be conducted, and
alumni will inspect buildings erected
in recent years.
At 6:15 p.m. in the Union a din-
nor will be held with President Ruth-
ven as guest speaker. Addresses will
also be presented by other members.
The meeting grew out of a sug-
gestion made by President Ruthven
and seconded by Christian F. Matth-
ews, '21L, president of the Alumni
Association. Mr. Carl Brandt, di-
rector of student-alumni relations at
the University, long active in the
Alumni Association, will be in charge
of the program.
Three Cooperatives
Asking Applications
Of Interested Coeds
The three cooperative houses for
women are accepting applications.
Rates for room and board in the
houses, Alice Palmer House, Kather-
ine Pickerill House and Muriel Les-
ter House, range between five and
six dollars per week for room and
board.
These cooperative houses now con-
tain 60 coeds and are run according
to the Rochdale principles of con-
sumer cooperation, which include
complete democracy, one vote per
member, profit-sharing basis.
If you are interested in seeing
what a co-op is like, and especially
if you're thinking of living or board-I
ing at one next semester, why not
call Ruth Wellington, of the Inter-
Cooperative personnel committee at
2-2218?
Forestry Club To Show
Expedition Films Today
jMotion pictures of the 1940 Alas-
kan Expedition presented by Pof.
Dow V. Baxter of the School of For-
estry and Conservation will be the
highlight of the Forestry Club smok-
er at 7:30 u.m. today at Jhe Union.
The program will also include se-
lections by "Windy Pogue's Moun-
tain Breezes." a hillbilly band made
up of members cf the club. Refresh-
ments will be served.
the conference luncheon at 12:45
p.m. in the League Ballrom.
Mr. Warren Good will act as chair-
man of the roundtable on "Educa-
tional Research" at 8:30 a.m.; Mr.
Eyron 0. Hughes. "Progress in 1940
in Understanding the Child As a
Whole": Professors Clifford Woody
and Irving Anderson, "Elementary
Education"; Prof. David Mattern,
"Music Education in the Changing
World'.

Coming Events
Graduate History Club meeting on

ASSOCIATED
POCTURE

PRESS
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PHILIPPE JAPANESE --
4sP .. OCCUPATION
.4"J APANESE "."
EMPIRE "-
R E V I E W I N F A R E A S T-Japan's gains after three and a half years of war in China are
indicated above. Some observers believe that Japan would like to end .this struggle to free herself
for more promising enterprises in1 southeastern Asia. Note the nearness of French Indo-China.

Thursday, January 16, in the Michi-
DAILY OFFICIAL gan Historical Collections, 160 Rack-
ham Building at 8:00 p.m. The sub-
BULLETIN ject for the -evening is "Special col-
_lections on the Michigan campus andj
their potential uses for history stu-
(continued from Page 4) dents." The speakers will be: Profes-
sor L. G. Vander Velde, Director of
tudents and their friends today, the Michigan Historical Collections;
4:00-5:3 spe r d Professor W. W..Blume of the Legal
Research Department; Professor J. S.
Worley, Curator of the Transporta-
Women's Glee Club: Important tion Library; Professor R. S. Ford.
rehearsal for Children's Theatre per- Director of the Bureau of Govern-
formance at 7:15 tonight in the Kal- ment; and Miss Ella Hymans, Cur-
amazoo Room, Michigan League. Re- ator of Rare Books. All seniors and
hearsal will be dismissed in time for graduate students in history are in-
the concert. vited. Refreshments.

Room 3201 E. Eng. Bldg. Professor Shakespeare, will give a review of
E. C. Case of the Department of Ge- scenes from "As You Like It" Thurs-
ology will talk on "Bone Hunting" day, January 16, at 7:15 p.m. sharp
and will tell about some of the pre- in room 302 Mason Hall. Persons in-
historic animals which are recon- terested are invited to this program.
structed from the bones which are
found. League House Representatives
meeting in the League at 4:45 p.m.
U. of M. Glider Club will meet on Thursday, Jan. 16. Attendance
Thursday, Jan. 16, at 8:00 p.m. in compulsory.
Room 348 W. Engr. Bldg. All mem- Bible Seminar meets Thursday at
bers should attend.
er sh ud at n .4:30 p.m . in Lane Hall.
Sigma Xi will meet on Wednesday Catholic Law Students will meet
Jan. 22, at 8:00 p.m. in the Rackham at 6:15 on Thursday. January 16, in
Lecture Hall. Dr. James Franck, De- the Michigan Union. Following din-
partment of Chemistry at the Uni- ner, Rev. James O'Mara, Ph.D.,
versity of Chicago, will speak on Archdiocesan secretary of Catholic
"Fundamentals of Photosynthesis." Charities, will speak. All students
interested in attending should con-
"As You Like It": The class in tact John Cummisky at the Law-
Speech 163, Oral Interpretation of yers Club.

O I L M A N -William Rhodes
bavis (above), international oil
operator recently mentioned as a
one-time bearer to U.S. of a
Nazi offer to negotiate peace
with the Allies, has invited con-
gress to review circumstances
surrounding case.

The Chemical and Metallurgical
Engineering Grauate Luncheon will
be on Thursday, Jan. 16, at noon in

fl

4 _

11

60 LOONih) nur

F R E N C H S O L D I E R S-Allied with Britain in the war
against Italy on Libyan soil are soldiers of the de Gaulle-directed
"Free French" forces, to which hese men marching at an Afri-
can desert camp belong. Flag bears Brittany coat of arms.

H A R D J OB, S OF T S A N D-slow is the going for British
soldier engaged in the battle with Italians in the deserts of
Egypt and Libya. Wearing less than the regulation uniform, two
Britons lead supply donkeys through soft sands.

ONCE IN A BLUE MOON
A SALE LIKE THIS
DOES HAPPEN!
and you really buy
$16.95 and $29.75 DRESSES
at
.00O
I Iere's )our chance to perk up your
Winter wardrobe very economically
while wc make room for incoming mer-
chandise!
TAILURED) DAYTIlME FROCKS
DRESSY AFTERNOON and
EVENING DRESSES
DANCE and SPORTS DRESSES
Sles 11-17 . . . 12-44 . . 16',-262

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. * 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
MISCELLANEOUS-20
WANTED-Used bicycle. Call L.
James Allen, 2-4483, or write Vic-
tor Vaughan House. 200
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.

I

11

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ill

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