100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 10, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 10,

I I

Council Invites
More Students
To JoinCo-ops
Group Is Now Accepting

World Affairs
DALYOFFICIAL BULLETIN' Will Be Topic
-- _ _ _--- -_ _ _ _ Of Halecki Talk

i

Change Hatch
Act Application

(Continued from Page 4)

R UE'sts f em e1rsh Architecture Building. Open daily,
fMembership 9 to 5, except Sunday, through Jan-
For Coming Semester uary 16. The public is invited.
Applications for membership in Exhibition, College of Architecture
student cooperatives next semester and Design: Drawings made for the
are now being accepted by the per- Inter-School Problem "A Labor Union
sonnel -committee of the Inter-Co- Center" at Massachusetts Institute of
oeranve-CounilHrolthOter-CilTechnology, Rensselaer Polytechnic
operative Council, Harold Osterweil, Institute, the Universities of Minne-
41 chairman o he committee an- sota, Cornell, and Michigan. Third
All men students interested in floor exhibition room, Architecture
All en tudets nterste inBuilding. Open daily, 9 to 5, through
either 'rooming or boarding in a co- January 11. The public is invited.
operative house next semester are re-

Wesley Foundation: At 7:30 to-
night we will join with the church
meeting in the Social Hall. At 9:00
p.m. there will be an Open House'
and Taffy Pull in the Recreation j
Room.--
Conservative Services will be held
at the Hillel Foundation tonight at
7:45. They will be followed by a
Fireside Discussion on "This Chang-i
ing World-Technics for Living," to
be led by Prof. Carl G. Brandt.
Coming Events
German Table for Faculty Mem-
bers will meet Monday at 12:10 p.m.
in the Founders' Room, Michigan
Union. Faculty members interestedt
in German conversation are cordially
invited. There will be "a brief talk
by Mr. Maurice W. Senstius on "Eine
Bergbesteigung in den Tropen" (with,
slides).!

Most Of Faculty
From Political

Problems of an international order
in European history is the theme of
a University lecture to be delivered
by Prof. Oskar Halecki, world famous
historian and former dean at the
University of Warsaw, Tuesday, un-
der the auspices of the history de-
partment.
Professor Halecki was expert to the
Polish Delegation at the Paris Peace
Conference in 1918-19, and later be-
came the League of Nation's first
secretary of the Commission of In-
tellectual Cooperation. He recently
organized the Polish University in
Exile in Paris and was its first head.
He has held the deanship of both
Social Studies and Literature,
Science and Arts at the University
of Warsaw, and was lecturer at the
Warsaw School of Political Science.

Exempt
Ban

In the future the Hatch political
activity law will not apply generally
to University employees, according
to a recent ruling made by the Civil
Service Commission in Washington,
D.C.
The Commission has informed
Dean E. Blythe Stason of the Law
School that it has taken formal ac-
tion differentiating the University's
land grants from those of the so-
called land-grant colleges. h
Only those employees whose "prin-
ciple employment" is in connection
with activities financed at the pres-
ent time by funds from the Federal
government will come under the jur-
isdiction of the Hatch law, according
to the Commission.
In the opinion of the Commission
the Michigan grants made by sta-
tutes in 1804, 1826 and 1836 are com-
pletely executed. since the lands ap-

quested to telephone Osterweil at
7350. All women students interested
should phone Ruth Wellington, '41,
at 22218.
There are now 13 cooperative
houses on campus, of which three
are for women, one is for married
couples and the remaining nine are
for men. The cooperative housing fa-
cilities at the University of Michigan
are famous all over the country and
are regarded as among the best in
campus co-ops.
The Michigan cooperatives are
conducted along the Rochdale prin-
ciples of consumer cooperation, whose
provisions include absolute democ-
racy; one member one vote; no dis-
crimination as to race, creed, color
or political beliefs. All work in co-
operatives is done by the students
themselves. Rates in the Michigan
campus co-ops vary from two dollars
to six dollars per week for room and
board.
Food To Europe
Group Will Meetk
An organizational meeting for the
local unit of the National Committee
on Food for the Five Small Democ-
racies will be held at 4:30 p.m. Tues-
day in the Union.
The Ann Arbor Society of Friends
and the Fellowship of Reconciliation
are among the local groups who are
active in sponsoring the new organi-
zation.
The organizing committee includes
Kenneth Morgan, director of the Stu-
dent Religious Association; Prof.
Arthur Dunham of the Social Work
Curriculum; and Robert Bessey,
Grad.

Lectures
University Lecture: Professor Oskar
Halecki, late of the University of
Cracow, Poland, will lecture on the
subject "The Problem of an Inter-
national Order in European History"
under the auspices of the Department
of History, on Tuesday, January 14,
at 4:15 p.m. in the Rackham Lecture
Hall. The public is cordially invited.
University Lecture: Myron Bement
Smith, Consultant in Islamic Archi-
tecture and Art at the Library of Con-
gress in Washington, D.C., will lecture
on "Iran: The Country and Its Archi-
tecture" under the auspices of the Re--
search Seminary in Islamic Art, In-
stitute of Fine Arts, at 4:15 p.m. on
Tuesday, January 21, in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. The public is
cordially invited.
Events Today
Spanish Play Try-outs at 3:15 p.m.
today in 312 R.L. All students of
Spanish are invited.
Alpha Lambda Delta luncheon this
noon at 12:00 in the alcove of the
League cafeteria. Important plans to
discuss.. Bring your dues, if you
haven't paid them.
J. G. P. Dance Rehearsal today at
4:00 p.m. in the Women's League.
Coffee Hour will be held today, 4:00
to 5:30, at Lane Hall. All students
are welcome.
Westminster Guild will meet to-
night, 8:30-12:00. Game Party. Re-
freshments. A cordial invitation is
extended to all.

The Student Branch of A.S.M.E. Now a resident professor at Vas- propriated to Michigan at that time
requests that all member of the Soci- sar, Professor Halecki is conducting for the use and maintenance of col-
ety be present at Rentschler's Studio a lecture tour of the United States leges and universities were managed
at 2:00 p.m. Saturday, January 11, under the auspices of the Kosciuszko by the State Legislature with no
for the group photograph. Foundation. control from the Federal government.
Graduate Outing Club will meet
in the club room at 2:30 Sunday after- Educational Films Are Featured
noon. Be prepared for hiking or ice
skating followed by supper in the clubu aVlt
room. (Use northwest rear entrance r R c a suldng . ll grdut
Rackham Building). All graduate _________
students are welcome. Among the thousands of films pro-
Bureau makes suggestions concern-
U. of M. Flying Club will meet at duced commercially some few, such ing classroom utilization of visual
Union on Tuesday, Jan. 14, at 8:30 as "Captains Courageous" and "Fury" material and issues all available lit-
p.m. Election of Vice President and contain examples of social problems erature on visual problems.
Secretary. worthy of supervised study. Offering.Fifteen major film topics are brok-
en down into subheads; for example,
Saturday Luncheon Group meets these two and over 600 other in- "Social Studies" is divided into so-
Saturday at 12:15 p.m. in Lane Hall. structional motion pictures to schools ciological and general and industrial
and adult groups throughout the geography. Under sociology are listed
Portuguese Classes, International state is the' function of the Bureau films on crime, public medicine and
Center: There will be an orgaza-of Visual Education of the University game preservation; while general
tional meeting of the classes in Portu- . geography deals with Axis, the var-
guese, to be offered by the Interna- Extension Service. ious continents and their products,
tional Center, Tuesday, January 14, For the first time this year 71
at 7: 30 p.m. Students should meet in films produced originally for the the-
the International Center. atre and having education merit are ail etrgteuaLe
available through the Bureau. Listed
Robert Friers under the title "Human Relations," Elects Officers.
the films are the latest addition to
Goes On Air a collection dealing with a variety Five Michigan Professors
of education topics from agriculture /.0
( -tGL3 N lcfl"1 PQF

a
7

f
1
'r
l
i
:
t,

news of the dorms
By GLORIA NISHON and DAVE LACHENBRUCH
1940 was a big year in the history and has notable success with it in
of the University of Michigan res- spite of its youth. The 19 upperclass-
idence halls, In recognition of that women have cooperated with the
fact we feel that it would be "al- staff in promoting a fine academy,
together fitting and proper" for us as well as a healthy social attitude
to devote the next two columns to a among the freshmen.
review first of activities connected Another important innovation
with the women's dorms for the past this past year has been the corre-
year and second of the men's dorms. tis progra been he of-
Firs imortnt ven ofthe lotion program between house of=
First important event of the ficials of bth men's and women's
year was the opening of Madelon dorms and the academic counselors
Louisa Stockwell Hall on February of the literary and engineering''
14, 1940. schools. By this system all avail-
This residence hall, which was able informtion on a student is
erected at a total cost well over $1- pole whenever a oble is
000,000, incorporates many of the podled w henever a problem dises
latest trends in dormitory architec- tndignesotistmadifficulty.
ture. Included among these features teligent solution to the difficulty.
are a majority of single rooms and a
substantial graduate section. Swomley oTalk
The dormitory was named after On Pacifist Action
Madelon Louisa Stockwell, first co-
ed of the University, who entered
the Lit School in 1870. Mrs. Fred- Secretary of the Youth Section of
crick G. Ray, who is known for her the Fellowship of Reconciliation,
long experience with University John Swomley, will address the local
Residence Halls affairs, was trans- chapter of the international pacifist
ferred from Mosher-Jordan to take organization, Monday, Jan. 13, in
over the directorship of the new Lane Hall. He will speak on "A Pro-
hall. Miss Martha McBride, whose gram for Pacifist Action."
official title is dietician, was put The same afternoon he will inter-
n charge of its physical operation view people interested in peace ac-
Helen Newberry and Martha Cook tion. These interviews will be held
dormitories celebrated their 25th luring the afternoon at Lane Hall.
anniversaries in 1940-Newberry Swomley was called before the
with gala festivities in June and Cook Senate Committee on Military Affairs
in November. vhen the conscription bill was first
Jordan Hall instituted its 'under- ┬░onsidered and came out against the
graduate advisory system this fall passage of such an act.
OF NEW 1941
RADIO-PHONOGRAPH COMBINATIONS
We carry a Complete Line of
* RECORD CABINETS
* ALBUMS FOR LOOSE RECORDS
0 NEEDLES
e CARRYING CASES
Victor, Columbia, Decca, Bluebird, Okeh Records
MUSIC SHOPy
205 EAST LIBERTY 'Phone 3675, Free Delivery

44

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

HELP WANTED
TUTOR WANTED for Economics
101. Write Jim Brooks, Box 1,
Michigan Daily. 182
TYPING-181
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN -Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
putbic. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
EXPERT TYPING by M. A. in Eng-
lish. All work guaranteed-Rea-
sonable rates-call Mrs. Walsh or
Mrs. Eley, 2-4108. 186
LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.I
Careful work at low price. 3e
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
LOST and FOUND'
LOST-Gold and black Schaeffer
Life-Time pen on South Univer-
sity. Reward. Call Helen, 7672.
188
FOR RENT
NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS for
teachers, graduate, or business
women. Laundry and cooking fa-
cilities if desired. 426 E. Washing-
ton, call at 422 or phone 8544. 187
FOR RENT - Apartment, unfur-
nished, three-room & bath; pri-
vate entrance, garage, automatic
heat. New home, southeast. Phone
5519. 184
FOR SALE
FRESH SWEET CIDER - Eating
and cooking apples. Will deliver.
Ph. 3926. 1003 Brooks St. 183
THE JOHN MARSHALL

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION -12
'PIANO INSTRUCTION - Tutoring
in musical subjects. Graduate of
School of Music, B.M. and A.B. Ed.
Sound methods and musicianship.
Call 2-4923 mornings and evenings,
179,
MISCELLANEOUS-20
WHITE year old female dog wants
a good home. Phone 6969. 185
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL--
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, Phone
7112.5c
TUTORING can bring returns by
using classified advertising. Rea-
sonable rates. Call at The Mich-
igan Daily. 125
SECOND SEMESTER Public Eve-
ning School begins Monday eve-
ning, January 13, at the Ann Arbor
High School. Classes will be or-
ganized in Typing, Shorthand,
Bookkeeping, Sports, Cultural,
Craft and Hobby courses. Small
enrollment fee. For further in-
formation call 5797. 181

Hitchhiker Gives Series
On Years Of Travel
Robert Friers, the University's
"vagabond reporter" and "hitch-1
hiking champ of the world," went on
the air this week wvhen a Detroitj
auto manufacturer began sponsoring
a series of travel talks over station
WSAM at Saginaw,
The talks, which treat in chrono-
logical order Friers' years of wander-
ing, may be heard over WSAM from
6:15 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. each day Mon-
day through Friday. The series will
be concluded Jan. 17.
Friers, a graduate student who has
earned his way through the Univer-
sity by lecturing, is now in his thir-
teenth year of traveling, mostly by
thumb. Pictures of his 6,000 mile trek
through South America were recent-
ly shown here.
Will List 100,004)

to vocational guidance.
The Bureau, one of about 30 in
various states of the Union, is op-
erating primarily to aid schools in
promoting the organization and ad-
ministration of local visual programs.
In line with this aim the Bureau pro-
vides demonstrations and training
in the operation of projection equip-
ment, teacher training, visual tech-
niques, and aid to schools in the se-
lection of visual materials and equip-
inent.
In addition to distributing 16 mm.
silent and sound motion pictures, the
Bennett Attends Meeting
Dean Wells I. Bennett of the Col-
lege of Architecture and Design is
in Chicago attending the meeting of
the National Association of Housing
Officials. The meetings are especially
considering defense housing.

I " e natioal at s
Five professors of the speech de-
partment were elected officers of the
National Association of Teachers of
Speech held in Washington during
vacation, it was announced here yes-
terday.
Prof. Louis Eich was nominated
as second vice-president of the group.
Prof. William Halstead was elected
to the executive council and Prof.
Kenneth G. Hance was named chair-
man of the nominating committee
and chairman of the publication
committee.
Prof. G. E. Densmore, chairman
of the department, was selected as
chairman of the finance committee.
Prof. Valentine B. Windt was elect-
ed to membership on the advisory
council of the American Educational
Theatre Association which met at
the same time.
The 1941 convention of the Na-
tional Association of Teachers of
Speech will be held in Detroit.

1'

.1

BLOU ES

s

By next June the University's ros-
ter of living alumni is expected toI
pass the 100,000 mark.
Last June the number of living
alumni had reached the total of 98;-!
914, with 61,762 graduates and 37,-
152 non-graduates. With a record of
25,876 deceased alumni, the grand
total of former students was 124,790.
These statistics are supplied from
the alphabetical master file of the
Alumni Catalogue Office.
"-I

_ ... c t1E l

HAL

r - aw

I -- - , - -

TUSSYIAn&
Weathwr lotion ;7

-4' ..,┬░')

ILL
3mirm m
HON THE NEW
Shaer that make a career of being
"First With The New"
Starlets today, they will play the lead in the fash'
-ion picture of tomorrow! And just watch them steal the
d scenes. DE LISO DEBS have that special
talent of being extremely distinctive
- without being extreme.
H e1igwed PALTER DE LISO
SHOES 41i;e WITH YOUTH
&

S

t
r
r

Reduced 11
Formerly to 3.95
BLOUSES
0*Silk
e Satin
* Jersey

I

F

s

KIRT

,
.
,
' "

0
S

Flannel
Sizes 32 to 38

I

I

I

.,'

z.4 ,;

@id

SKIRTS
0 Corduroy
* Velvet
* Wool

Regular $1 Siae,,4., 5O~o
The original Wind and Weather Lotion. Smooth
on face, hands, neck, to help guard against
chapping. A smooth powder base. Grand for
scratchy-rough heels, ankles, knees, elbows,
Get several bottles now-and save half price!
Ask for handy 6-bottle Family Package at $3.

0
S

Plain and Plaid
Sizes 24 to 30

LAW-
scloot
FOUNDED 1899
AN
ACCREDITED
LAW SCHOOL

COURSES
(40weeks peryear)
Afternoon-3 years
5 days. .. 4:30-6;30
Evening - 4 years
Mon., Wed., Fri.,
6:30-9.20
Post-graduate
lyear..twiceaweek
Practice courses

Offer Expires TOMORROW, January
Most Complete Cosmetic Counter in the
Trained Cosmeticians

11
City

1 Table of Merchandise-If2 Price
Handkerchiefs, Lingerie, Mittens, Gloves.
Articles slightly soiled from handling.

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan