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January 08, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


"" THE MICHIGAN DAILY

don wirtehafter's I

Puckmen Undergo Stiff Practice For Huskies Tilt

DAIL Y
DOUBLE

Bennie Pleased With Cagem

,

I,
High Street Troubles,. .
THE DOUBLE got in an argument
yesterday.
An old friend cornered us in the
Union and asked whom we thought
would be the new Ohio State grid
coach.
The whole thing started when we
barked back "Paul Brown" without
hesitating.
"Aw, you're nuts," came the re-
ply. "St. John would never pick a
high school coach to carry on such
a task. You watch and see, George
Hauser will get the job hands
down."
Our friend had logic to back his
arguments. He pointed out that
Hauser, the present Minnesota line
coach, has built the forward walls
which have spelled defeat for Wol-
verine teams for the past seven years.
A record like that is all Ohio is look-
ing for. A Buckeye coach can keep
his job as long as he wants as long
as he beats Michigan each cam-
paign.
Then the Double went into action.
We were still far from convinced.
Granted, Ohio probably would like
to settle for Hauser right now and
would feel quite safe about the sit-
uation.
But the Buckeye officials are in hot
water. They have a serious problem
on their hands, one they never
dreamed about when they first went
out shopping for the man to succeed
Schmidt.
Somebody had to go and mention
the name- of Paul Brown at that
time. Several newspapers started
campaigns. Brown, to them, was the
natural choice. He was young and
tremendously affable. His record at
Massilon High was astounding. His
teams were unbeatable.
But Ohio hesitated over the mat-
ter. After all, there is a whale of a
difference in handling high school
and college men. The older lads like
td think for themselves. They have
a different spirit and will on the field
of battle from the kids who would
"do or die" for good old Creepy Val-
ley .Junior High. Brwn was a gam-
ble. Some other more experienced
man would be a much surer invest-
ment.
And while Ohio stopped to con-
sider the matter, the deluge came.
It came in the form of pressure
from every other high school coach
in the state.
These scholastic football mentors
jumped on the Brown bandwagon
and were' quick to inform the Ohio
officials :about it. They threatened
to start urging their stars to attend
other schools if Brown didn't get the
job.
After all, you can't blame these
coaches. They have everything to
gain by hoisting Brown into the
Buckeye helm. It's their big chance
to prove that a successful high school
coach can also make good in the big
time. If Brown can do the trick, all
of these men's stock will be doubled
in value.
Now Ohio is wondering. Can they
gamble on Brown? If they don't, what
about the demands of his backers?
The Buckeye squad is filled each year
with Ohio men. What chance would
another coach have in Columbus
without the support of the high
school coaches throughout the state?
Frankly, the Double thinks he'd have
his troubles. A 40-0 score would be
tame.k
Nope, Hauser or no Hauser, we
still stick with Paulsy-Waly
Brown as the most logical candi-
date.
LYLE BOND, Michigan outstand-
ing pitching candidate, had a
tuberculin kidney removed during

IMentor Lauds
Bill Cartmill, Leo Doyle,
Herrmann To Plug
Forward Hole
By NORM MILLER
When the Michigan basketball'
team trounced Michigan Normal by
20 points earlier in the season, Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan wore a face as
long as a billy goat.
But when the Wolverines dropped
their Big Ten opener to Ohio State
by 10 points Monday, Bennie's vis-
age was all smiles.'
Why the strange paradox? Because
in spite of the fact. that they lost to
the Buckeyes, the Varsity cagers'
turned in one of their best perfor-
mances of the yet young campaign,
and in the eyes of Oosterbaan, prom-
ise to rmake plenty of trouble for the
Conference top notchers before the
season is over."
"We've got a great bunch of scrap-
pers," remarked Oosterbaan yester_
day afternoon, "The gang fought
their hearts out in that game. But
the OSU team that beat us couldj
have defeated almost anyone that
night. They were that, good. We won'ti
bump into playing like that all the
time."
The Varsity mentor was especially
enthusiastic over Captain Herb Bro- F
gan's performance in the encounter Fitz,
with the Bucks. "He played the best theria a
game of his career here," Benny pected t
opined. but will
In addition to the fact that they to activ
were up against a "hot" team, the ond sem
Varsity hoopmen missed Bob Fitz- Ooste
gerald's towering six-foot, four-inch Bill H
stature, and his ability to snag shots sophom
off both backboards. forward

yen: Eddie Lowrey
Team For Showing Shuffles Men,
- --- ---- - _-- Se k Off s

BILL HERRMANN LEO DOYLE

e

who is recuperating from dip-
t home in Kalamazoo, is ex-
back in school late this week,
probably be unable to return
ve competition until the sec-
nester.
rbaan intends to alternate
errmann, Bill Cartmill and
ore Leo Doyle in the vacated
position depending upon the

style of play of the opposition.
Doyle, a scrub at the start of the
season, has come along rapidly the
past few weeks. He broke into the
lineup in the Pittsburgh game and'
scored two baskets, hooped three
more against Princeton, and tipped in
another shot in the few minutes heI
played against the Buckeyes.

Gillis, Ross Spark Squad;
Players Out To Avenge
Defeats Of Last Year
By BOB STAHL
Shuffling his puckmen into severalj
different combinations in an effort
to select a starting team for the en-
counter with Michigan College of
Mines here Thursday night, Coach
Eddie Lowrev put his charges
through a stiff practice session last
night at the Coliseum
With the skaters concentrating on
offense, goalies Hank Loud and Hugh
McVeigh had their hands full. John-
ny Gillis, who is fast acquiring an
acurgte, driving shot, and Charley
Ross. always a Wolverine scoring
threat, displayed a powerful offen-
sive combination as they brought the
puck time and again into scoring
position and set up goals. And with
the Michigan Techmen noted as a
high-scoring aggregation, from all
appearances Thursday night's game
should be one of the best ever played
on the Coliseum ice.
Team Has Incentives-
The Michigan team has several
added incentives spurring them on in
their preparation for this game. Be-
sides wanting to show Mill Marsh,
Ann Arbor News scribe, that he was
wrong in saying that their chances
for victory were none too bright
against the Huskies, the puckmen
bear something bf a grudge against
the Huskies themselves.
It seems that the hockey schedule
was completed early last July, with
Michigan set to play a two-game
home and home match with the Col-
lege of Mines. Early this fall, how-
ever, the Miners cancelled the two
contests which were to be played at
Houghton, Michigan, in order to
schedule an additional two games
with the University of Minnesota.
Consequently, the Wolverines are
deprived of one of their longest trips
of the season.
Wide Open Game
Moreover, the Michigan team is
out to avenge the three defeats suf-
fered at the hands of the Miners last
year, when they conquered the squad
from Houghton only once. So with
the Wolverines determined to win
this game and with both teams pre-
paring to stage a wide-open offensive
drive, Thursday night's encounte'
gives much promise of being the start
of a new era in the history of Mich-
igan hockey.
Dean Signs Cub Contract
CHICAGO, Jan. 7. -(p)- Dizzy
Dean may have lost his fast ball but
the lanky Chicago Cubs' pitcher
showed plenty of speed today in re-
turning his signed contract for the
1941 season.
Ol' Diz sent the signed document
in so quickly that it became the first
signed contract received in the Cub
office.
SWIMMING NOTICE
All varsity and freshmen swim-
mers are requested to attend an
important meeting at 5 p.m. today
in the Sports Building.
Matt Mann, Coach

Matmen Prepare For Dearborn
By STAN CLAMAGE Deane will vie at 136 pounds; Marvi
As Cliff Keen tries to work out the Becker will grapple with John Pau
vacation kinks that some of his in the 145 pound class; and Joh
wrestlers have acquired, the opening Wilson tackles Emil Lockwood in the
dual meet with the Dearborn AC
draw cloerheavyweight division,
At the present time Keen has de- As Michigan trounced the Dear
cided upon only five of his grapplers born AC last year, 22-4, four of th
who will open the 1941 dual season. members of the year's team co.
In the other weights, he is holding peted.rPaul) and Galles took the
competitive matches today among two matches, while Becker won<
the aspirants to help decide the re- special exhibition tussle. Klemac
mainder of the squad. lost the only match at 121 pound
Fred Klemach at 121 pounds, Tom but looked surprisingly well consid
Weidig at 128 pounds, Capt. Bill ering that he had only two days o
Combs at 155-pounds, Art Paddy at workouts behind him.
165 pounds and Jim Galles in the The Dearborn team doesn't appe&
165 pound class are the men most as if it will provide too tough an op
likely to compete Saturday at the position for the Wolverines, althoug
Field House. it will have two good boys from las

Six wrestlers compete for the three year-Smuck, a heavyweight, and
remainirg berths: Ed Wight and Ray Williams at 175 pounds.

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CG

oaehes Seek Reds Place Three On All-Stars;
Marquette Job Greenberg Only Tiger Selec

'ted

Board Interviews
Applicants For

Dozen
Post

MILWAUKEE, Jan. 7. -(M)- The
Marquette University Board of Ath-
letics continued its search today for
a successor to John L. (Paddy) Dris-
coll whose contract as head football
coach was terminated at the end of
last season,.
About a dozen applicants have beeni
Contacted by The Daily last
night Line Coach Clarence Munn,
who came to Michigan with Fritz
Crisler three years ago, declared:
"I've had no proposition offered
me and I'm very happy here at
Michigan."
interviewed by the board and it is
estimated that nearly as many more
will appear. Selection is expected in
about a week.
Among those interviewed were
Francis Schmidt, recently released
by Ohio State; Jimmy Kitts, of Rice;
Bunny Oakes of Colorado; Line
Coach Tom Gorman of Creighton;
Bill Edwards of Western Reserve, and
Aldo (Buff) Donelli of Duquesne.
Others mentioned as being con-
sidered were Joe Boland, Notre Dame;
Dukes Duford, St. Louis; Art Guepe,
Virginia; Clarence Munn, Michigan,
and Mike Casteel, Arizona, former
Michigan State backfield coach.

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 7-(P)-As befits
a world championship team, the Cin-
cinnati Reds placed three players
today on the annual All-Star Major
League Team picked for the Sporting
News by members of the Baseball
Writers' Association.
Bucky Walters and Paul Derringer,
the Reds' masterful pitchers, and
Frank McCormick, first-baseman
and the National League's most val-
uable player, were the Cincinnati se-
lections. Ernie Lombardi missed win-
ning the catcher's position by only
10 votes.
The American League Champion
Ctawthon Resigns
Texas Tech Post
LUBBOCK, Tex., Jan. 7. --(P)-
Drawlin' Peter Willis Cawthon, mak-
er of winning football teams and
one of the most picturesque char-
acters in the coaching profession, re-
signed today as athletic director and
head coach of Texas Tech College to
escape a deemphasis movement.
He acted "in the friendliest spirit,
and with no disagreements or hard
feelings toward anyone," after it be-
came certain that college athletic
officials were determined to start
scheduling minor opponents.
"It just boiled down to the fact
that the school wanted to break away
from a major schedule and I wanted
to keep climbing in my profession,"
Cawthon said.

Detroit Tigers were represented by
one player-Hank Greenberg in left
field.
The New York Yankees, who
placed five- men on the team in 1939,
when they were World Champions,
slipped to two - Joe DiMaggio in
center field and Joe Gordon at sec-
ond, both repeaters. DiMaggio was
almost unanimous. getting 301 of a
total of 308 votes.!
Other All-Star choices were Ted
Williams, Boston Red Sox, right field;
Luke Appling, Chicago White Sox,
(shortstop; Stan Hack, Chicago Cubs,
third base; Harry Danning, New
York Giants, catcher, and Bobby Fel-
ler, Cleveland, pitcher. Walters, Fel-
ler and Williams were on last year's
team.
The All-Star lineup of 11 players
included six from the American
League and five from the N&tional.
TENNIS ENTRIES
Entries for the annual All-Cam-
pus Winter Tennis Singles Tour-
nament to begin Sunday, Jan. 12,
close today. All undergraduates
except those holding varsity tennis
awards from any school are eli-
gible. Entries must be made at the
Sports Building.

ar

L

Hurry!

Hurry!

F

I7

1

Fa

m

the vacation and chances are slim,
that he will be allowed to return to
action this spring . . . That leaves
Ray Fisher with but one experienced
hurler for his mound staff . . . Mick-
ey Stoddard . . . The AAU is inves-
tigating the cagers who picked up
pennies at the Ohio game Monday
night . . . Bennie Oosterbaan is quite
concerned about the' matter . . . He
called it a cheap stunt by the crowd
which could easily cause serious in-
juries to the players .. . Tom Har-
mon never got to Washington to re-
ceive the Walter Camp trophy ..
Flying conditions were far too bad
s . Did you read Bob Murphy's tear-
jbrking open-letter to Tom in the
Detroit Times yesterday .. . He asks
Harmon to return to Ann Arbor and
finish school.... "You owe it to your-
self, to the University of Michigan,
to youracollege sweetheart (guess
who?) and to all the thousands of
kids who believe in you, to finish the
job you have started."
Tommy evidently read the letter
and hurried home quick. He was
here before the paper went to press.
r . I

etaiib&Tbn
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