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January 07, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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mHE MICHMAN "AA-IL-V

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY T1E~T~AV, Ji~NThiRY 7. 1941

Former Michigan Grid Captain
Is Injured In Indianapolis Fire
r,
Davad Allerdice sr., '10, captain _
of the Michigan' football eamin
1909, suffered serious burns in a
fire in his northside Indianapolis
apartment Sunday, in which his wife
and eight-year-old son Anthony lost,
their lives, and David Allerdice, jr.,
Princeton football player, was burned
severely in an " attempt to rescue his
mother and brother.
John Allerdice, '44, another son,
a member of the University of Mich-
igan freshman football squad, spent
the night at the home of a friend
and was noto at home when the fire
occurred.
The former Michigan star, Aller-
dice senior, who received his letter
on the football team in 1907, 1908
and 1909, and is now vice-presidentj
of an Indianapolis meat packing
firm, was burned on the head, face,
hands, feet and back.
David, Jr., who arrived In Indian-
apolis Saturday from San Francisco,
where he played as a halfback in the
Eaist-West charity game, discovered M~iiilSElllil~lWes
the fire when he came home shortly DAVID ALLERDICE, Jr.
after 5 ajm. Sunday. It is believed
that he then rushed into the house
to awaken his parents and the three collapsed and David, Jr. was over-
then went into another room to come as he attempted to carry him
wake Anthony. The elder Allerdice from the burning building.

Ann Arbor

,
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Today's

News

fact that students were

Despite the

Robert Griffin
Will Give Talk
Spanish Club To Sponsor
Lecture Thursday
The second lec'ture in the 1940-41
series of six sponsored by La Socie-
dad Hispanica will, be presented by
Robert Griffin at 8:15 p.m. Thurs-
day in the Natural Science Audi-
torium.
Mr. Griffin's lecture, entitled
"Mexico, Land of the Future and
Romance," will be illustrated by nat-
ural color motion pictures depicting
the beauty and picturesque features
of our neighbor to the south.
A lecturer of long experience, Mr.
Griffin is well acquainted with the
various phases of Mexican life he will
describe in his lecture and has en-
joyed success in man parts of the
state.

The senior Allerdice was the first
of the series of triple-threat Mich-
igan halfbacks, and, in his year of
captainship, the team won six games
and lost one. Coach Fielding H.
Yost reminisced that in the Minne-
sota game of 1909, Allerdice, his left
hand broken and in a cast, passed
the team to a 15-6 victory.
Educators Confer
In Three-Day Meet
More than 100 educational leaders
and research workers convened here
for the inivitational Conference on
General Education Jan. 2, 3 and 4.
Dr. Eugene B. Elliott, superintend-
ent of public instruction presided at
the opening session. Dean Edward
H. Kraus of the literary college pre-
sided at the general session and Pres-
ident Alexander G. Ruthven extended
the greetings of the University. Mem-
bers of the faculty of education par-
ticipated in six discussion groups on
various fields of cultural education.

absent from Ann Arbor during the
last two weeks, life in the community
continued to exist.
One of the town's leading citizens,
George Burke was honored by Gov.
Van Wagoner when he appointed the
attorney to serve on the new state
civil board. Burke is the likely chair-
man.
Local politics was marked by an-
nouncements from Prof. J. B. Waite
and Cecil O. Creal, incumbent alder-
men, that they would seek re-election
in the coming spring election. A. L.
MacDonald, Ann Arbor business man,
declared himself in the running for
the position of mayor.
Prof. John B. Waite of the law
school also came into the news for
the letter he sent to Sen. Vanden-
berg, Sen. Brown, Rep. Earl Mich-
erer, and Secretary of War Stimson,
in which he criticized the selective
service policy of prohibiting those
punished for crime being drafted
for compulsory military training. He
asserted that it is contrary to the
belief that men who have been pun-
ished for a crime are to be accepted
into society.
Rob West fall Is Hero
In Daring Rescue Role
Bob Westfall, star football back
and captain-elect of next year's var-
sity squad assumed the role of a hero
during vacation when he rescued an
eight-year-old Negro boy from
drowning on the afternoon before
Christmas.
, Nelson G. 'Turner fell through the
thin ice covering the Huron River at
the municipal bathing beach about
150 yards from the shore. Aided by
two playmates, he clung to the edge
of the ice. He was finally rescued
by Westfall who got soaking wet
when the ice gave way beneath him
as he was walking towards the boy.
1He was able, however, to toss the lad
on to firm ice.
Westf all treaded water until two
fishermen forced their boat near him
and pulled him up.
Wilson Succeeds Knudsen
NEW YORK, Jan. 6-(P)-Charles
E. Wilson, acting president of Gen-
eral Motors Corp. since William S.
Knudsen left that post to assist in
the National Defense Program, was
elected president today, Alfred P.
Sloan, Jr., chairman, announced.

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200 Radio Stations Sign With ASCAP

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NEW YORK, Jan. 6-(/P-The
American Society of Composers,
and Publishers, considering a pro-
posal to license the use of ASCAP
music on network programs of five
national advertisers, announced to-
night that more than 200 individual
radix stations had contracted for the
use of music it controls.

Directors of ASCAP, whose music
was eliminated from the major net-
works on Jan. 1 because of the chains'
refusal to agree to an increase in
music rates, discussed the advertisers'
proposal to license ,the music for
commercial programs, but made no
announcement at the conclusion of
their session.

A MEI'

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SAGE IN

4,rWs e rV V FW Wd b

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COMPLETELY SATISFYING smoke.

i

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MARY JANE YEO
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of New York's Skating Hit

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it Happens on ice"
at the Rockefeller You try them and find them
Center Theatre

plus the

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Not to say anything about the.. convenience of hav-

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Why not.

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KYER LAUNDRY,
Phone 4185
WHITE SWAN LAUNDRY

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Phone 2371-23
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II

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