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October 08, 1940 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N~

PAGE FOURTEEN

TIDE MICHIGAN DATT.Y

SUNDAY. OCTOURR 6.

THE MCT117~AN IQv.

11)A V l i VL~iI V.Ei:Y

_._ i

Enesco Traces
Love Of Music
To Ancestry
Picked Up Violin By Ear
By Listening To Songs
Of Rumanian Gypsies
In addition to his talents as vio-
linist, composer and conductor,
Georges Enesco has a grand opera to
his .credit. His "Oedipus" taken
from the Greek tragedy was first
produced in Paris, 1936, and made a
marked impression. Enesco has divid-
ed his time between violin concerts
and composing% He has toured
France, Belgium, Holland and not
only played but often has conduct-
ed the various orchestras with which
he appeared. His compositions par-
ticularly the First and Second Rou-
manian Rhapsodies have been played
widely.
Georges Enesco, world-famous vi-
olinist, composer £ and conductor
traces his intense love of music to
his Roumanian ancestry. His father
was a farmer, and as a child Georges
was really exposed to the national
flavor of the Roumanian folklore and
music. He was so profoundly affect-
ed by the music of the gypsies that he
asked his father to get him a fiddle
such as the one he had seen a gypsy
musician play. Without knowing a

I

Life Of Tenor Richard Bonelli
Reads Like Horatio Alger Story

. ........ .

Metropolitan Star Started
As Newsboy And Farmer
During School Years
In the course of a brilliant singing
career, Richard Bonelli, the man
whose life story reads like a Horatio
Alger novel, has earned a popularity
which entitles him to the title of
"Baritone of baritones."
Mr. Bonneli, who made his debut
with the Mertopolitan Opera in 1932,
as Germont, the father in "La Trav-
iata," supplements his operatic and
concert = appearances with radio
broadcasts. During the past season
he compiled an enviable record. He
was the first Metropolitan Opera
singer to be engaged for the Ford
"Universal Rhythm Hour," in a
series that ran all summer and in
addition he made three appearances
as soloist on the Ford Sunday Eve-
ning Hour.
Invited To Washington
He alone, of all American bari-
tones, was invited to sing at the In-
augural Concert given in Washing-
ton last year in honor of President
Roosevelt.
This season, the New York Phil-
harmonic has engaged him to play
the important role of Amfortas in
a concert version of Parsifal. Toscan-!
ini selected him for this part when
it was presented four years ago.
Bonelli worked his way through
high school, doing all sorts of odd
jobs after hours. Newsboy, farmer's
helper in harvest time,rbank mes-
senger, bookkeeper, gardener in a
cemetery, auto mechanic's helper and
zinc miner-these were but a few of
the jobs which kept the prospective
ily. At the age of 13 he entered the
Paris Conservatoire, studying violin,
composition and theory with such
masters as Massanet, Faure, Gedalge.
Three years later the Conservatoire
awarded hi mthe highest prize for
violin and shortly thereafter he made
his concert debut,,playing the Beet-
thoven Concerto with the Colonne
Orchestra.
Enesco divided his time between
violin concerts and c mposing. He
toured France, Belgium, Holland and
not only played, but often conducted
the various orchestras with which he
appeared. His compositions particu-
larly the First and Second Roumani-
an Rhapsodies, began to be played
widely, and he returned to Roumania
a figure of international acclaim.
Established in the ranks of musical
greats, he was presented to Queen
Elizabeth of Roumania, who wrote
poetry under the psudonym of Car-;
men Sylva, and who was a devoted
patron of the arts. Having been
disappointed in many of her prote-
ges, the Queen had refused to hear
any others. Through the influence
of Princess Bibesco, Her Majesty was
prevailed upon to give him an au-;
dience.

opera star busy during his school
years.
It was while he was attending Syra-
cuse University on a scholarship, that
the Dean heard the young man sing.
Musical talent ran in Bonelli's fam-
ily and the Dean, deeply impressed
with his ability convinced him to
start out on thecventuresome but
glamorous path which is the life of
an opera star.
Goes To France
After studying for a time, a friend
offered him the money to go to France
and study. He accepted, and after
Paris, events moved swiftly. He made
his operatic debut with the Monte
Carlo Opera and successes in Italy,

y

1

CHORAL
Happily

UNION

the

Greatest
World

GEORGES ENESCO

RICHARD BONELLI
France, and Germany followed in
rapid order.
The name Bonelli was evolved from
the Yankee, Bunn, during his stay
in Italy, where it is quite common
fdr the opera manager to demand a
name of Italian fabrication.
While singing with Mary Gardon
in Paris he was engaged by the Chi-
cago Opera Company, returning to
America in 1925, he remained with
that group until he joined the Metro-
politan in 1932.
Bonelli is not new to Ann Arbor
music lovers; he appeared in last
year's May Festival. He is also in-
dispensable to the famous festivals
at Worcester and Evanston.
Singer Gets Stage Fright
Before U.S. President
Marion Anderson's only attack of
stage fright in her long singing
career was when she visited the
White House.
She had been invited to sing for
the President and Mrs. Roosevelt and
she had prepared an appropriate
speech of thanks to the nation's exec-
utive for the honor.
When she entered the room, the
President rose to greet her, remark-
ing that she, looked just like her pic-
tures. Choked with emotion, the
great contralto trembled with stage
fright and forgot her speech.

in

the

Wednesday, October 23
MARIAN ANDERSON . .

Thursday, November 7
RUDOLF SERKIN

. . . .

note, he repeated faultlessly the songs
he had heard. Perceiving that the
boy was unusually gifted, his father
took him to the best teacher in Rou-
mania who instructed him until his
seventh year, and then suggested that
he be taken to Vienna.
Studied At \Vienna
He was eager to study composition
at the famous Vienna Conservatory
and only consented 'to play the violin
because some instrument had to be
included in the curriculum, and the
violin casses were the least crowded.
Enesco was fortunate in attracting
the attention of the director Hellmes-
Berger, whose grandfather had
learned conducting from Beethoven,
and of the influential Bibesco fam-

rNames
" . . Contralto
. . . . . Pianist

Monday, November 18
DON COSSACK CHORUS
SERGE JAROFF, Conductor
Sunday, November 24, 3:00 P.M.
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
JOHN BARBIROLLI, Conductor

Tuesday, December 3
RICHARD BONELLI ...... .
Wednesday, December 11
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Baritone

SERGE KOUSSEVITSXY, Conductor

V..
4

Wednesday, January 1S
VLADIMIR HOROWITZ

. . . . Pianist

r ,
MARIAN ANDERSON
4 rui e mmoriat o muic
NOTHING MORE NEED BE SAID than the name Marian
Anderson, for she has sung in Ann Arbor on previous occasions.
No other artist has ever excelled her in winning the hearts of
music lovers. Her appearances always mean packed houses.

. .

Tuesday, January 28
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
DIMITRI MITROPOULOS, Conductor
Thursday, February 20
BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET

Tuesday, March 4
GEORGES ENESCO

.I 9 9 9 9

Violinist

OVER-THt-COUNTER SALE of all unsold season tickets
and of single concert tickets begins on Monday, October 7, at
8:30 at the office of the University Musical Society, Main Floor,
Burton Memorial Tower, The sale will continue so long as the
limited supply of tickets lasts. Season tickets, $12.00 - $10.00.
Single Concerts - $2.50-- $2.00-- $1.50.

.I

r ,

Ill.

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