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December 18, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNECi)zAvDE(:EMifflA184, 19t

. .

Briggs Signs Contract
DETROIT, Dec. 17--aA-A con-
tr act betwee. the Briggs rinu fai-
tur ig Co. and Unlited Airci ift Womi
Local 7423of th U
mnobile Workers1° was si gned'L today,_}
granting wage, increcases and vacation
allowances to workers in the new
Briggs Aircraft Parts and Sub-As-
sembly plant here.

New Society
A a inst War
kOro'an*zed

West Quad Library Is Designed Ickes Charges
To Furnish Freshmen Readings Axis Sabotage
- Aimed At U.S.

Professors To Attend Vacation Parley

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Iowa
com
U.S.

Editor Will Head
mittee To Battle
I nterventi onists

NEW YORK-(A-)-Formation of
he No Foreign War Committee was
E nnounced yesterday by Verne Mar-
hail, editor of the Cedar Rapids'
Ia.. Gazette, who is chairman of the
new organization.
At its helm, besides Marshall, are
0. K. Armstrong, Springfield, Mo.,
author, as director of the organiza-
tion, and Robert A. Lancaster, New
York investment bank associate, as
treasurer.
In a statement issued after a two-
day organization meeting here, Mar-
shall said:
"For months, out' in Iowa, I have
watched the development of a psy-
chological trend toward actual and
physical American participation in
this war.
"The William Allen White Com-
mittee to Defend America by Aiding
the Allies has done an effective job
of originating and developing exact-
ly the same public psychology as
that which was carefully created
during the war period preceding our
declaration of hostilities, in April,
1917.
'In a large measure: the success of
the White Committee is due to the
lack of opposition to its efforts. The
masses of people, who are extremely
fearful of their country's catastrophic
involvement in the current phase of
Europe's incessant warfare have had
_ no voice with a national audience.

benounces Col. Lindbergh
In Address At Columbia
UniversityYesterday
NEW YORK, Dec. 17--)-Secre-
tary of the Interior Ickes charged to-
night that the Axis plans to cripple
the United States by sabotage, to
sap it by propaganda and to drive
a wedge of suspicion between this
country and Latin-America.
In a speech prepared for the Co-
lumbia University Institute of Arts
and Science, Ickes also denounced
Americans whom he described as ap-
peasers. Among them he named Col.
Charles A. Lindbergh, whom he
called a "peripatetic appeaser who
would abjectly surrender his sword
even before it is demanded."
Last September, Ickes said, "The
Nazis in Los Angeles, at their meet-
ing in the Deutsches Haus, offered
their nomination for the presidency
of the United States to Col. Charles
A. Lindbergh!
"Of course, I do not say that the
Colonel accepted or even was con-
sulted about this precious gift. I am
merely stating a significant fact. Af-
ter all, Lindbergh has been the proud
possessor of a Hitler decoration for
several years and his recent utter-
ances, both at home and abroad, have
not been of a tone that would per-
suade Nazi sympathizers in this coun-
try that he would not be susceptible
to the flattery of a 'nomination' for
president at their hands however ab-
surb such a gesture might be in the
eyes of patriotic Americans."
The Secretary also took Merwin
K. Hart, president of the New York
State Economic Council, to task on
the ground that Hart "misses few oc-
casions to sneer at democracy." Dur-,
ing the last campaign, Ickes said,
Hart delivered an address before the
Union League Club in New York in
which he attacked democracy as a
"foreign" importation, a Communist
plot.

Four memrers of the --i
departneht wi e present at ihe
LTiti n i neili 1t'iitg'r: el[ tlie Ailel '-
wa!i E )Iiowtk' Ant(iatt }hI r ieI.
27-30 in New Orleans.
Prof. Charles F. Remer will give
a paper on "The Role of the Uni-
versity in Economic Research", and
Prof. Arthur Smithies will talk on'
"Process Analysis and Equilibrium
Analysis".
Prof. Edward C. Simmons and Mr.

JamesDuesenberly s11illso go to the
New« reaSsessions.
L atwver l o Cos iene-
Dean E. Blythe Stason, Prof. Lewis
M. Simes and Prof. Laylin K. Janjas.
all of the Law School. will attend
the holiday sessions of the Associa-
tion of American Law Schools to be
held Dec. 26 to 30 in Chicago.

f\ 9441

111

Don Scanlan, '43E, librarian, assists a student in selecting a refer-
ence book in the West Quadrangle Freshman Study Hall.

I .

EX'TRA TRAIN SERVICE
FOR STUDENT TRAVELr
DECEMBER 20th, 1940
Student Section Train No. 44 (all points East) leaves 3:45 P.M.
Tq Chicago - And Internediate Points
Leaves Ann Arbor 1:00 P.M.
Student Section Train No. 8 (all points East) leaves 6:30 P.M.
Low Fares to All Points
No permit from Immigration Department or Draft
Board required to travel to Buffalo and points
beyond- on Michigan Central Railroad trains:
through Canada.
MICHIGAN CENTRAL

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Freshmen living in the West 1
Quadrangle don't have to go to the
main library or Angell Hall Study
Hall for their reference books any
more, because they now have a branch1
library right in their own home.
The West Quadrangle branch of,
the general library, an innovation this
semester, is especially designed to
furnish required reading for fresh-
men in the literature and engineer-
ing colleges. In time this service is
expected to be enlarged to include
the required reading in courses de-
signed for sophomores also.
One great advantage of this new
study room is that it is open later
than the other University libraries
-until 12 midnight. Its hours are
10 a.m. to 12 m., 5:30 p.m. and 7
p.m. to 12 midnight.
This new library service is expect-
ed to do much toward relieving
crowded conditions in other Univer -
sity libraries and study halls, espec-
ially before examinations.
The study hall, since its inception,
Former Student
Plays Lead Role
In 'Silver Cord'
Betty Lou Evans, former Michigan
student, has been chosen to play the
leading role in Sidney Howard's psy-!
chological drama "The Silver Cord"
which opens this week at the Yale
University Theatre.
As a Grad student here a few years
ago, Miss Evans was active in Play
Production courses and shows. At
Yale she is studying the technique of
acting, and comes into contact with
a number of Broadway directors who
teach there in the dramatic depart-
ment.
Other major roles which Miss
Evans has taken at the Yale Theatre
include the title role in "Margaret
Fleming," early American realistic
play. She has been cast also for
an important part in "Dust To
Earth," an original play written by
a member of the Yale Playwrighting
division, which will be produced early
in 1941. After graduation from Yale
Miss Evans plans to enter profession-
al acting.
President, Wife Disagree
On British Aid Question
WASHINGTON, Dec. 16. -()-
The President and the First Lady
don't see exactly eye to eye on the
question of aid to Great Britain, al-
though they are both in favor of
assistance.
Yesterday, Mrs. Roosevelt said she
favored outright gifts of cash rather
than loans. Today the President
said talk of loans or of outright gifts
was rather banal.
I-
buy our large assortment
of
CHRISTMAS GREETING
CARDS
le to 50c

has attracted large numbers of dor-
mitory students. They claim its main
advantages are its nearness to their
living quarters, the informality of
attire required and the late hour until
which they may study.
Swedish Plant Expludes
STOCKHOLM, Dec. 17.-UP)-An,
explosion in the great Bjoerkborn
dynamite plant founded by Alfred
Bernhard Nobel of peace prize fame
seriously injured at least 20 per-
sons and shattered many buildings
in the southern city of Karlskoga

Houghton Says Drama Future
Rests With University Theatres

By JEAN SHAPERO
A greater hope for the future of
American drama lies in the Universi-
ty theatres rather than in commun-
ity theatres, Norris Houghton, art
director of the St. Louis Municipal
Opera, declared in an interview yes-
terday.
"The continuity of institution found
in universities enables them to take a
long view of the theatre," Houghton
explained, "while community theatres
are apt to depend on the interest of
people of a town-and this interest
can easily die out if the theatre goes
into debt or if some of the leaders
move from the community."
Hough ton is here on one stop of a
six-months tour of universities and
small theatre groups gathering ma-
terial preparatory to writing a book
on the American theatre.
Although the universities are giving
students education in drama, Hough-
ton feels that graduates require more
training than they can receive in a
college course. One of the problems
his book, which will be the first of its
kind in American literature, will at-
tempt to answer is where these stu-
dents can get that necessary training.
Other questions with which his
book, financed by a grant from the
Rockefeller Foundation, will deal are
the relationships between Broadway
and the University Theatre, what
drama is in America today, and what
connection there is between the
movies and theatre groups. An earli-
er book of Houghton's, "Moscow Re-

hearsals," describing Russian produc-
tion methods, was written as a result
of his visit to Russia in 1934-35, while
he held a Guggenheim Fellowship,
after his graduation from Princeton.
At that time, Houghton declared,
the Russian theatre was the finest
in the world. He observed in con-
nection with this that educational
opportunities are greater in fields of
art in Russia, since talented students
are given auditions and, if good
enough, are paid to go to school. The
drama schools are connected with
large theatres. Another difference
between Russia and this country is
that there is a greater demand for
artists than there is supply because
of the popularity of drama in contrast
to that of the movies.
Houghton has been in Ann Arbor a
few days and says he is most im-
pressed by the attitude among stu-
dents and faculty of "artistic hones-
ty." "The aim here," he added, is to-
ward artistic excellence which is too
often lacing among drama groups."
lacking among drama groups."
He described the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre as being exceptionally
fine among the theatres available' to
college groups. He was also inter-
ested in the unusually active spring
and summer drama work when pro-
fessional actors take part in plays
with student actors during the spring
Drama Season and the large number
of plays produced during the Michi-
gan Repertory season.

MONW16-1 645k, -Ilw szm

DO YOU KNOW ANYONE whc
wouldn't like an album of Strauss
waltzes for Christmas? Then give
them Tschaikowsky's Fifth. Radic
& Record Shop, 715 N. University.
JEWELRY OF BETTER QUALITY
at Eiblers. Bracelets,- necklaces,
brooches, compacts reasonably
priced. We will gladly help you.
308 South State.
BOOKENDS, brief cases, fountain
pens, desk sets, book covers, bill-
folds, desk calendars, playing
cards, etc. WAHR'S BOOK-
STORES.
JUST a small remembrance or a
grand gesture! You'll find just
the gift for "her" at the ELIZA-
BETH DILLON SHOP 'round the
corner on State..
A HINT TO THE WISE. Every dis-
criminating man will enjoy a pair
of Bass Weejuns. There is nothing
finer. VAN BOVEN SHOE, INC.
FLOWERS are the perfect gift for
all women. Add the personal touch
to your Xmas gift this year 'with a
bouquet or corsage from UNIVER-
SITY FLOWER SHOP, INC., 606
E. Liberty.
MEN'S TIES-Ann Arbor's best val-
ues in silks -rayons -and all
wool . .. 55c or 2 for $1.00. Can-
ton-Degener, 609 E. William,
Phone 4341.
GIFT BLOUSES-The popular gift
this season; sheers in long and
short sleeves - white and pastel
shades-Smartest Hosiery Shoppe,
Mich. Theatre Bldg.
GIFT HEADQUARTERS-Complete
stocks, perfumes, Kodaks, cosmet-
ics, smoking supplies, men's toi-
letries, pen and pencil sets, leather
notebooks. Calkins-Fletcher, 324
South State.

HE'S BOUND to be pleased with a
tie, a pair of socks, a hat or some
other article of really fine clothing
chosen from our grand selection.
SAFFELL & BUSH, 310 S. State.
[F YOU CAN'T DECIDE, remember
, music on records - a gift that's
lasting and in good taste. Albums
of records for $2.00 up. Radio &
Record Shop, 715 N. University.
3IFT SUGGESTIONS from the
VARSITY FLOWER SHOP, 1119
S. University. Candles, cards, gift
wrappings, pottery, Xmas greens,
and cut flowers.
YOU CAN'T MISS with a gift select-
ed from our fine stock of fountain
pens, pencils, study lamps and
typewriters. Come in now! Bal &
Thrasher, 205 South Fourth Av-
enue.
A GIFT THAT PLEASES MEN. Pick
any pair of pajamas from our
Xmas selection and it's a hit. $2.00
up. Kuohn's Clothes Shop, 122
E. Liberty.
FOR SOMEONE you especially want
to please, we area showing our
finest stock of furs in years. Drop
in soon, won't you? Marchande
Furs, 607 E. Liberty.
A NEW PIPE, jar of tobacco, or a
carton of cigarettes from our com-
plete tobacco counter is just the
thing for the man in your life -
SWIFT'S DRUG STORE. 340 S.
State.
GIVE A PRACTICAL GIFT this year.
Give house slippers, shoe trees,
shoe bags, shoe mittens, hosiery,
rubbers, and boots. Custom Boot
and Shoe, 121 S. Main Ph. 3831.
THE BEST SUGGESTION YET for a
gift that's sure to please, is a
fountain pen, a pencil, or both -
chosen from our magnificent stock.
Mayer-Schairer, 122 S. Main.

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Al
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Shop at

'OLLETT'S

At-,

Use this
Check List for
Your Guide to
Good Giving:

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"BEST SELLER" RECOMMENDATIONS

FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS.
F.QUNDATION STONE.
INVITATION TO LIVE.
MRS. MINIVER.
OLIVER WISWELL.
ON THE LONG TIDE..................
THE VOYAGE.......
YOU CAN'T GO HOME AGAIN
I MARRIED ADVENTURE
NEW ENGLAND: INDIAN SUMMER.
PILGRIM'S WAY ....

Hemingway
Warren
Douglas
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Krey
Morgan
Wolfe
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.Brooks
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$2.75
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A TREASURY OF

THE WORLD'S GREAT LETTERS.....
Schuster $3.75

100
Name

Pieces
Cards,
1

of Christmas
Seals and Tags

CHRISTMAS CARDS
2 for 5c; 5c; 10c and 25c

QC

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