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December 18, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

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1 LiIP M I TfhA T~ .AA1iYri 1. n 1 V. A ...l! 1 L Y j W DINi 10

SDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1940

U

lire Fighters Attend Classes
Between Calls,_ChiefReports

Ann Arbor

The popular notion that all a
fireman does when he is not pouring
water on a fire is sit around the
station and play checkers certainly
does not describe the Ann Arbor fire
department, according to Fire Chief
Benjamin Zahn.
The men in his department, he ex-
plained, in addition to their regular
duty of responding to calls for as-
sistance, are going through a con-
tinuous educational training so that
they may become better firemen.
Twice a week the men on each shift
attend a fire school held in the sta-
tion. Using the conference method
the men study a wide variety of sub-
jects all of which Chief Zahn be-

lieves is necessary for their work.
First every man must know the lo-
cation of every street in the city and
where each of Ann Arbor's 435 fire
plugs is situated. They learn pub-
lic speaking so that they may educate
the public on fire prevention. They
study the use of fire tools, the dif-
ferent methods of fighting all types
of fires, building construction, hy-
draulic principles that apply to their
work, the safest and most efficient
way to use certain chemicals
In order to become better acquaint-
ed with the area they are to protect,
every fall and spring men from the
department examine all business es-
tablishments in town.

Here Is
In

Today's
Summary

News

Arnold "Pat" Walsh, outstanding
Ann Arbor softball player will become
a member of the police department
on Jan. 1.
He is 30 years old and a life long
resident of Ann Arbor. He was once
employed by the University buildings
and grounds department.
Four prominent Ann Arbor busi-
ness men have been elected to the
board of directors of the Chamber
of Commerce. They are Harold D.
Golds, attorney; Joseph W. Mundus,
insurance agent; Cone W. Lighthall,
general manager of the Hoover Ball
& Bearing Co. and Herbert Beisiegal,
forester for the Detroit Edison.
Prof. John W. Regal, director of the
bureau of industrial relations in the
University will speak at the Rotary
Club's luhcheon in the Union on "The
Current Labor Situation."

Case List Full
For Old People
Deficit 'Imminent' If More
Are Added To Load
LANSING, Dec. 17. -(A' Case
loads of old age. assistance and aid
to dependent children must soon
be "frozen" to avoid deficits, the
State Social Welfare Department
reported today.
The Department notified county
supervisors that pending applica-
tions for old age assistance dated in
August and September, 1939, now
may be investigated and approved
for payment. This action, Fidele
Fauri, assistant to the State Wel-
fare Supervisor, said, would admit
about 1,700 aged persons to the rolls
in December, bringing the total load
to about 78,000.
Two thousand more may be ad-
mitted in January. Fauri said, in-
creasing the total, after allowing for
deaths, to about 79,500.!

ri

I

I

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

P,

i

MISCELLANEOUS-20
WILL THE gentleman who pur-
chased a gift at the Campus Shop
to be mailed to Chattanooga please
call there at once.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, Phone
7112. 5c
TUTORING can bring returns by
using classified advertising. Rea-
sonable rates. Call at The Mich-
igan Daily. 125
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Student to act as cam-
pus political correspondent and to
sell subscriptions for NATIONAL
POLITICAL CAMPUS NEWS. Lib-
eral commissions. Write imme-
diately to The Editor, National
Political Campus News, Wood-
ward Bldg., Washington, D. C. 175J
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Brown leather billfold. Re-
ward. Forest Hainline, Lawyers
Club, Phone 4145. 174
LOST-Black Parker fountain pen;
probably in U. H. S. Please return
to Jean Crawford at Martha Cook.
Reward.. 173
SHELL-RIM GLASSES and brown
purse; Union lounge. Must have
glasses. Reward. Call Nancy
Drew, 2-4514. 170,
FOR SALE
PRIVATE SALE Furniture-Black
walnut bed and dresser (not four-
poster) marble-topped table, chair,
curtains, small rugs, etc. 7265
176

TYPING-18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY-2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT, LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
TRANSPORTATION -21
PASSENGERS for cars going home
for Xmas can be found by running
classified ads. Reasonable rates
and quick results. 161
RIDE HOME in one of our trans-
portation bargains. With a car-
full, expenses are much less than
buying a ticket. Come to Cushing
Motor Sales, '400 W. Washington.
Telephone 2-3261. 167
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Rooms for men. Steam
heat, shower bath, constant hot
water. Phone 8544, 422 E. Wash-
ington. 166
BURNS PARK DISTRICT-Fur-
nished six-room house for four
months or for second semester.
Available January first. Telephone
7059. 167

B Ten
Highlights...
Campus surveys released recently
received much attention around the
Big Ten this week as activities les-
sened before Christmas vacation.
A survey at the University of In-
diana of the number of failure slips
received by university women
showed a marked decrease in the
average number of hours for each
student over the record of last.
year. Sorority pledges had an in-
crease from 3.04 hours average to
3.20 for each student. An average
of 1.5 hours of "smoke-ups," the
Indiana name for failure slips, were.
sent to upperclass sorority women
while women living in the dormi-
tories received an average of only
.94.
The University of Purdue an-
nounced a new Aeronautical Engin-
eering Curriculum this week. Only
majors who have completed four
years of work in civil, electrical, me-
chanical and metallurgical engineer-
ing will be admitted to the course.
The fifth year will be devoted to aero-
nautical structure, airplane power,
research in meteorology, stress anal-
ysis, and airplane engines.
An interesting poll was released
this week by the Student Opinion
Surveys. It was a national tabula-
tion of the percentage of students
who cut classes and the number
they cut. It was found that 62
per cent attended all their classes,
although last February 64 per cent
said compulsory class attendance
should be abolished, and 38 per cent
cut at least once. Southerners had
the highest percentage of students
cutting at least once (57) while New
Englanders cut the least, only about
25 per cent missing one or more
classes a week.
Note from the Exchanges:
The Chicago Daily Maroon is send-
ing the most glamorous man and
woman on the campus to the Mardi
Gras, expenses paid.

2 Faculty Men
To Give Papers
Professors Will Address
Political Science Group
Eight members of the political sci-
ence department will attend the an-
nual session of the American Politi-
cal Science Association to be held
Dec. 27 to 30 in Chicago.
,Prof. Arthur W. Bromage will give
a paper on "General Property Tax
Limitation", and Prof. Harold M.
Dorr will act as chairman of a round
table section on "Citizen Organiza-
tion".
Participating in the round table
on "Teaching Problems in Political
Science" will be Prof. James K. Pol-
lock.
Dr. David M. French will deliver
a paper on "Government Policy and
the Control of Credit" at a round
table considering the problems of
government and business,
Also attending the convention
will be Professors Joseph R. Hayden,
Everett S. Brown. Harlow J. Hene-
man and George S. Benson. Profes-
sor Benson will also attend the con-
vention of the American Society for
Public Administration to be held si-
multaneously in Chicago.
The Dascola Barbers
Say
SEASON'S GREETINGS
To You All
"Keep A-Head of Your Hair"
LIBERTY OFF STATE

DAILY at 2-4--7-9 PM.
-- NOW PLAYING -
andsves a
e aonat
n the thrilteri
unusual 'vsY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

w . _ _ . _ _ . _ - _ _ _ .

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1940
VOL. LI. No. 68
Publication In the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to a
members of the University.
Notices
Prospective Applicants for the
Combined Curricula: Students wish-
ing to apply for admission to one of
the combined curricula for Septem-
ber 1941 should fill out applications
for such admission as soon as possible
in Room 1210 Angell Hall. The final
date for applications is April 20, 1941,
but early application is advisable.
Pre-medical students should please
note that application for admission
to the Medical School is not appli-
cation for admission to the Combin-
ed Curriculum. A separate application
should be made out for the consid-
eration of the Committee on Com-
bined Curricula.
Applications in support of research
projects: To give the Research Com-
mittees and the Executive Board ade-
quate time for study of all proposals,
it is requested that faculty members
having projects needing support dur-
ing 1941-1942 file their proposals in
the Office of the Graduate School by
Friday, January 10, 1941. Later re-
quests will, of course, be considered
toward the close of the second semes-
ter. Those wishing to renew previous
requests whether receiving supportj
or not should so indicate. Applica-
tion forms will be mailed or can be
obtained at Secretary's Office, Room
1508 Rackham Building, Telephone
331.
Directed Teaching, Qualifying Ex-
amination: Students expecting to
elect Educ. D100 (directed teaching)
next semester are required to pass a
qualifying examination in the sub-
ject which they expect to teach. This
examination will be held on Satur-
day, Jan. 11, at 1 p.m. Students will
meet in the auditorium of the Univer-
sity High School. The examination
will consume about four hours' time;
promptness is therefore essential.
Seniors: College of L.S. and A.,
School of Education, and the School
of Music: Tentative lists of seniors
have been posted in Room 4, Uni-
versity Hall. If your name does not
appear, or, if included there, it is
not correctly spelled, please notify
the counter clerk.
General Library: During the vaca-
tion period the General Library will
be open daily from 8:00 a.m. till 6:00
p.m. from December 20 until New
Year's Day, except on December 25
and January 1, when it will be closed
all day, and on December 24 and
December 31, when it will close at
noon. From January 2 through
January 4 the hours will be 8:00 a.m.
till 10:00 p.m.
The Graduate Reading Rooms will
close at 6:00 p.m. Friday, December
20, and observe the usual holiday
schedule thereafter: 9:00-12:00 a.m.
and 1:00-5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday, and 9:00-12:00 a.m. on Sat-
urdays and on the days preceding
the two legal holidays.
The Departmental Libraries will be
open from 10:00-12:00 a.m. on Sat-
urday, December 21, and regularly

each day from 10:00-12:00 a.m. and
2:00-4:00 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day, beginning with the week of De-
cember 23. They will be closed on
the afternoons of December 24 and
December 31.
Wm. W. Bishop, Librarian
t
The Automobile Regulation will be
lifted for the Christmas vacation
period beginning at 12 noon on Fri-
day, Dec. 20, 1940, and will be re-
sumed Monday, Jan. 6, 1941, at 8:00
a.m.
Office of The Dean of Students
Civil Service Examination: The
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information has
received from the Department of
State Employment and Registration
at Baltimore, Maryland, notice of an
examination for Statistician.
To be eligible, an applicant must
have two years' recent responsible
experience in statistical work, or two
years of graduate work in a profes-
sional school of education, public
health, social work, or public admin-
istration, or two years of graduate
work in one of the social sciences.
The Departments in which statisti-
cal positions in this class occur in-
clude the State departments of Edu-
cation, Health, Labor and Statistics,
Public Welfare, Unemployment Com-
pensation, and Highway Planning.
The salary is $1,800.00, and the clos-
ing date for applications, December
30th.
Complete application on file at the
Bureau, 201 Mason Hall, office hours
9-12 and. 2-4.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has also received notice of the fol-
lowing United States Civil Service
Examinations. Last date for filing
application is noted in each case:
Assistant Biological Aid (Fisheries)
salary $1,620, Jan. 16, 1941.
(Continued on Page 4)

! I I ..

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ELE

ORDER YOUR
PARTY

CT

RIG

PICTURES
NOW
Prices will be
Higher after Vacation
Gach
Camera Shop
Nickels Arcade

Extra
IN COLOR!
"MARCH ON MARINES"
"Sportsman's Partner"
WORLD NEWS
-Coming Friday -
JOHN GARFIELD
"EAST OF THE RIVER"

II J

One word describes all three:

CLEAN! "
"My spic-and-span kitchen is something I don't take
for granted. Much of its attractiveness and cleanli-
ness is due to electric servants ... electric lighting,
electric cooking, electric water heating. I often won-
der what the room would be like without them.
"Thanks to these three helpers, I can work in clean,
pleasant surroundings, under soft light that is easy on
the eyes. I can cook dinner by flipping a switch and
setting a clock. I can have plenty of hot water for
dishes or housecleaning by simply turning a faucet.
"Yes, electricity DOES things in a home ... and 1
thank my lucky stars that I have these faithful ser-
vants working for me every day of the year at such
small cost."
Why not learn how thriftily YOU can employ more
electrical helpers? Automatic electric water heating
costs less than 10c a day for an average family of
three. Electric cooking for the same family averages
$1.55 a month. Put these labor-saving electric servants
to work in your household! ... The Detroit Edison Co.
YOUR DEALER has electric ringes and water heat-
ers on display. Stop in today-on sale at HARDWARE
STORES, FURNITURE AND DEPARTMEN7 STORES,
AND ELECTRICAL DEALERS.

- Thursday -
"Dispatch
From Reuters"

Matinees 25c - Also -
Nights 40c "Marine Round-up"
Incl. Tax Heisman Trophy Award

STU DENT'S

SECTION

OF
TWlLIG(m&HT L IM'I TE D
LEAVING ANN ARBOR, FRIDAY
rlECF RE 2 -_ 1OAn

I

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