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October 03, 1940 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-03

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F

'N I w

T

six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1940

reshme
Annual Mixers
Will Feature
Campus Bands
800 Freshmen Will Dance;
In League, Union Ballrooms;
'Conga' To Be Demonstrated
Approximately 400 freshmen men
and women will "mix-up" to the mel-
odies of Bill Sawyer's Swing Quintet,
at the Freshman Mixer to be held,
from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. today in
the Union Ballroom. A second 400
new students will dance to Bill Gail's
orchestra at the second mixer to{
be held from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
tomorrow in the League Ballroom.
An additional feature of the Friday1
affair will be a demonstration of thet
Conga by Jane Connell, '42, Dick
Strain, '42, Claire Reed-Hill, '42, and
Bob Shedd, '42.
Mixers Prove Worth
The Freshman Mixers were inaug-
urated at the University about five
years ago. They have been continuedi
each year since as they have proved
excellent in assisting, freshmen in
becoming acquainted with their class-
mates. The programs for the affairs<
have been planned with a specialt
emphasis on the "mixer" idea.
Advisers of the Orientation groups
will attend the mixers with theirc
group members. Tickets for the
dances were distributed to the fresh-1
men during Orientation week and
these will be necessary for admis-t
sion to the ballrooms. Women willI
be admitted free while there will bei
an extra charge of 15 cents for all
men.-
Co-Sponsors Named1
Co-sponsors of the mixers are the
League and Union represented by
chairman Virginia Osgood, '41, Mar-
garet Hubbard, '41, Dick Strain, '42,1
and Dick Scherling, '42.t
Last year a Henry Ford orchestrat
featured square dances at the fresh-l
man mixer.
Entertainment faturing the Conga
was provided at the dance which wasc
held for the freshman women after1
the reception for Dean Alice Lloyd,
which was held at the League onc
Thursday and Friday of last week.t
Because the women were so enthusi-;
astic about the shuffling jungle
rhythm of this slave dance, it is ex-
pectedethat an equally enjoyable time
will. be had by all those freshmen
who attend these tea dances.
Initiation Is AnnouncedY
Phi Sigma Sigma is thie first oft
the sororities to announce an initia-
tion this year. The new initiate ist
Reva B. Frumkin, '42, Flint. To fill1
in a vacancy that was left from last
year, Shirley Kaplan, '43, of Grosse<
Pointe, was elected secretary.I

Will

Meet

At

Mixers

Tod ay

And

Tomorrow

Outdoor Qroups
Plan Mixed Trip
To Youth Hostel
With bicycles, meal ingredients
and comfortable clothes, the women's
outdoor club, in conjunction with a
Union men's group will attempt the
first mixed hosteling trip into the
Saline Valley Saturday and Sunday,
Oct. 12 and 13.
The first 10 women to sign up
with Gertrude Inwood, '43, Stock-
well, and Marion Bale, '41, also of
Stockwell Hall, will have the oppor-
tunity of taking this second trip un-
der the Youth Hostel plan. The two
day adventure will cover 15 miles of
cement road, since gravel and bi-
cycles do not mix, according to the
participants of the last Saline Valley
trip.
The ambitious group will leave
about noon Saturday from the WAB,
and will stop at the Saline Valley
Farms where meals will be cooked
over either an outdoor or indoor fire.
With good weather, plans call for a
re-entrance into Ann Arbor in time
for Sunday dinner. Bicycles can be
rented at $1.50 for the weekend,
while the evening rest will cost but
a quarter. Men must sign up with
carl Rohrbach, '42E, of the Michi-
gan Union.
Upon the success of the first expe-
dition of this year depend the plans
for a Patterson Lake trip which is
being considered for the skating sea-
son. This new offer of mixed-party
trips is in accord with the Women's
Athletic Association policy of offer-
ing more "mixed sport" to students.
The outdoor club first joined the
American Youth Hostel last spring,
when the first trip was made. The
club hostel membership is a blanket
one, entitling all who make trips un-
der its auspices to the facilities of the
Hostel farms. All women are eligible
to sign up for the Saline party, since
the outdoor club has an "open mem-
bership."
The youth hostel movement, which
gained its fame from its European
origin, has been very popular in the
Eastern states of the United States,
and especially in New England. It is
only recently that this movement has
taken the Middle West and West by
storm.
Archery, Dance Clubs
Sponsor Initial Teasi
All women students interested in
modern or ballet dancing are invited
to attend an organization tea spon-
sored by the dance clubs at 4 p.m.
tomorrow in the Women's Athletic
Building.
The archery club also will hold its
organization tea at 4:30 p.m. tomor-
row in the WAB.

Jeather Jn Jder (lap-

An atmosphere well saturated with
anticipation may lead to many
things. In this case, it is ushering
in an event as important to old-
timers as to the newest freshman or
transfer - Michigan's first home
game of this season. Clothes will
take no small part in next Saturday's
jovial and sportive spirit.
There are different ways in
which to dress, and seeing high-
heels and a pill box hat at one
glance, then saddles and uncovered
curls with the next look is abso-
lutely normal. The circumstances,
however, under which each are
worn are anything but the same.
If a date is to accompany you
through the crowds and to a seat
in the bleachers, it's best that
heels and hat be worn, but greater
informality follows the group of
women attending together.
Remember that, after all, a date
for football spectating is still a date,
and one should dress accordingly.
Tweed suits wilf probably be ideal
for the game, or a three-piece outfit
may better answer the weather prob-
lems of the day.
Snap-brim hats or beanies will be
favorites, but slightly dressier hats
are as acceptable, for so many out-
siders come to see the game bedecked
in their finery, and they're mixed in
with the students enough that classic
hats are not necessarily the order of
the day. Outsiders make the scene
more formal. Since they're not in
the cheering section, however, that
is a place of greater informality.
No hats, of course, should be too
dressy, for there is practically no
situation that allows an extreme
for Michigan co-eds. Pompadour
hats with a bit of decoration, such
as feather or ribbon, will be as
appropriate as will something that
dips just a little over the eye. If
it's cold enough for fur coats, and
you're among the fortunate who
own a beaver hat, don't fail to have
it top your first game outfit.
As to fur coats, it often happens
that it's too warm for them at the
beginning of the season, but if you
think it is cold enough to be com-
fortable in one, wear it. A tweed or
trimmed coat will do as well. Lea-
ther gloves are a good idea, no mat-
ter what the rest of the costume may
be.
Shoes and dress must be chosen
with an eye to what is to be done
after the game. There are many
parties' or fraternity and sorority
buffets that follow thevictorious
(said with hope) march up State
Street, and many dances in the
evening, so find out if one such is
to be included in yor day. Abso-
lutely the safest thing to wear is
a wool dress for they're a happy
combination of casualness and for-
mality. You can walk into any af-
fair but a formal dance with a
snappy wool.
Corduroy, the newest of materials
to be cut into classic dress lines, will
also answer the football question.
Wear a matching beanie, if one is
to be had. Appropriate for next Sat-
urday are flannel and wool blouses,
but they are not dressy enough for
Two League Committees
And Assembly Board
Plan Initial Meetings
Three League groups, the Theatre-
Arts and Candy Booth Commitees
and the Assembly Board will hold
their initial meetings of the year to-
day in the League.
On the Theatre-Arts committee,
only the committee heads and their
assistants will be expected to attend
the first meeting at 4 p.m. Plans for
the coming Children's Theatre sea-
son will be discussed.
All members of the Assembly Board
will be ejpected to be present at its
meeting at 4:30 p.m., Patricia Wal-

pole, '41, has announced. The prob-
lems of League House zoning and
the election of dormitory represen-
tatives will be discussed. Members
of the Board include one delegate
from each dormitory, and the presi-

Masculine Taste
Approves New
Corduroy Coats
By A. PAUL BLAUSTEIN
Women on the Michigan campus
are still continuing to confuse men,
please them, disappoint them and
prove that "La Donne" is still "Mo-
bile" along the fashion front.
The latest thing, which is caus-
ing a minor fashion sensation on
practically every campus in the coun-
try, is the wearing of corduroy coats
in all sizes and shapes, and in all
styles from that of a short jacket
to that of an overcoat.
The Men Finally Approve
And it certainly is about time that
the women came out with some sort
of new and interesting fashion that
the men really like so our hats are
off to the fair sex.
These jackets come in all colors,
and everything from a pale blue to
a scarlet red is in the vogue. Some
are close fitting, others hang loosely,
some have V necks, others have col-
lars, some have two buttons and
some have as many as sift. But they
are all attractive and approved of.
Perhaps the most popular of these
among the men are those in a light
red which seems to compromise beau-
tifully the colors of pink and scar-
let. A small V neck on the jacket
which is short and form fitting is
most popular.
Condemn High Socks
But despite these charming gar-
ments the female of the species still
manages to chase away the anxious
male by two other articles of femi-
nine attire-high wool socks and
dirty saddle shoes.
Time and time again men have
taken their pgi in hand to criticize
both of these but like the wind, the
rain and the tides they continue to
go along ad infinitum. The saddle
shoes have received the seal approval
from some men in the past but -their
use for anything but sports is not
desired.
No Saddle Shoes On Dates
So, confessing failure, we stop
complaining but do ask that they
are not worn on dates or on import-
ant functions and are kept clean.
The fight against the high wool
sock has been more successful and
men have finally got them against
the ropes. That they are unbecom-
ing everyone knows and the belief
that they are effective barriers
against the wintry blasts of Ann
Arbor is no longer valid.

You Might Be Wrong;
Rushing CansBe Fun, Too
If rushing means nothing to you
but a type of grueling experience that
one suffers through with a set grin
and a forced pleasantness, think
twice-it's fun !
Meeting all the girls that it would
ordinarily take years to get around
to, relaxing and talking just as fast
as all women love to do, amusedly
watching good entertainment and
not so good entertainment is all just
as much fun as making the ordinary
round of weekend parties. So rush-
ers and rushees, start really enjoy-
ing yourselves.

Newman Club Honors
Newcomers At Mixer
Catholic students of St. Mary's
Chapel will be received at a mixer
to be held by the Newman Club at
8 p.m. today in the chapel club rooms.
Hostesses will welcome strangers to
an evening of dancing and games
with old members of the club.
The opening club meeting for the
coming year will be held Sunday,
Oct. 6, at 4 p.m., when plans for the
coming year will be presented and
discussed. Any Catholic students
may join the Newman Club by re-
questing membership

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ELEANOR HANAVAN
dances that evening, so only don
that if there will be time to change.
Luck followed all women stu-
dents of universities with auto
bans when this fall's shoes were
designed. Low-heeled pumps are
in full style, and that means com-
fort in walking to the game. Neat
flat-heeled shoes and anklets are
for the game only, but not for the
following festivities. The almighty
spectator pump is still a choice
one can't go wrong on.
If .one is to sit with a group of
girls-and many such groups from
a house or dormitory hall do band
together for the game--done should
dress in just about the same way as
on campus. A good looking suit, or
a skirt and sweater with a short,
boxy coat fits in well with the over-
flowing gaiety of the occasion. Wear
saddle shoes, not heels. If you want
to wear a hat, which is hardly neces-
sary. make it a snap brim or a
beanie.
Now to introduce the Best-
Dressed Co-ed of the Week, whose
picture here is to be a weekly fea-
ture. This co-ed, chosen from the
actual campus scene, is not one
who has necessarily acquired pre-
vious fashion fame. Last week dur-
ing orientation, Eleanor Hanavan,
'41, was seen in a busy moment
around the League. She won the
best-dressed award with a costume
that was casually appropriate to
the occasion, yet outstanding be-
cause of its trimness, and empha-
sis on color scheme for distinctive-
ness.
The jumper is of royal blue, self-
printed corduroy, and the blouse of
grey wool. Her anklets were of a
lighter blue, and the saddle shoes
were clean.
dent and secretary-treasurer of the
Ann Arbor Independents, the League
Houses and Beta Kappa Rho, an or-
ganization composed of women work-
ing in private homes.
The Candy Booth committee, un-
der the chairmanship of Beth Cas-
ter, '41, will also meet at 4:30 p.m.
to discuss its plans for the coming
year.
Tomorrow members of the Dance
Class committee will meet at. 4:15
p.m. in the League. Margaret Whitte-
more, '41, chairman of the commit-
tee will announce the positions as-
signed to her committee members
at this meeting.

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onfthe Big Game
There's one thing that fair football fans
can't overlook . . . football fashions.
Tailored corduroys, sporty wools, and
smooth jerseys will contribute to the
-' # warmth and spirit of your cheering sec-
tion this Saturday. Better stop in at
Colilns today to check up on your foot-
ball eligibility.

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