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October 03, 1940 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-03

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3, -194th~

THE MIGHTGA DAILY-

PAGE

TH..HGA AT

PAGE

Tigers Blast D
Soph Gridmen Are Impressive
In First Collegiate Com petition

erringer
Buck Wins For Bake3

From Mound, Defeat

Reds,

7-2

By HAL WILSON
If the showing of Michigan's soph-
omore gridders in the California tilt
is any criterion of what Coach Fritz
Crisler can expect of them in future
battles, then the Wolverine reserve
problem is solved.
For the performance they turned
in while undergoing their initial bap-
tism of big-time football was indeed
impressive. While it is true that the
caliber of the opposition put up by
the Golden Bears was not as auspi-
cious as expected, nevertheless, go-
ing into action before a hostile mob
of 42,000 fans against one of the
West Coast's famed "name" football
teams while 2,500 miles away from
home is not the easiest way to break
into intercollegiate gridiron competi-
tion for the first time.
Sophs See Action
And go into action is just what 12
sophomore gridmen did last Satur-
day-with emphasis on the action.
livery one of Crisler's first-year men
who made the air jaunt to the Golden
West saw service in the 41-0 drub-
Wing of the Bears.
In the third quarter a reserve
eleven comprising mainly sopho-
mores staged a sustained drive for
more than half the length of the
field, ending in a counter when lanky
Cliff Wise bucked over for his first
Vichigan touchdown. Hard-running
Harold "Tippy" Loclard, rugged
spph fullback, was also instrumental
in the long march over and around
the discomfited Bear outfit with his
hard line-smashing.
Ceithanil Fills Bill
Bruising George Ceithaml stepped
into Capt. Forest Evashevski's big
cleated shoes and turned in a mas-
terful job as field general, both his
signal-calling and sharp blocking
pore than fulfilling the promise he'
had shown in pre-season drills.
On the third play of the game
halfback Bob Kresja was rushed in
to replace Norm Call who sustained
a heel injury, and his subsequent
performance was more than satis-
factory. Husky Al Wistert, sopho-
more regular tackle, started his first
.Vaisity .game for the Maize and Blue,
and his play was very reminiscent
of his brother's All-American work
back in 1933.
Highly-rated Bob Kolesar and
'M' CLUB MEETING
'M' Club meeting at 8 p.m. to-
day at the Union.
- Bill Combs

Rudy Sengel made their respective
debuts in capable fashion. Soph
flankmen Rudy Smeja and Phil
Sharpe showed up well. Big Clar-

DETROIT, A. L. AB
Bartell, ss ........4
McCosky, cf....... 5
Gehringer, 2b ... 4
Greenberg, lf .... 5
York, lb.........4
Campbell, rf......3
Higgins, 3b.......4
Sullivan, c........3
Newsom, p........4
Totals .........36
Detroit...........050
CINCIN'ATI, N. L. AB
Werber, 3b ........4
M. McCormick, cf. 4.
Goodman, rf...... 4
F. McCormick, lb . 3
Ripple, if......... 4
Wilson, c .........2
Riggs, z ...........1
Baker, c ..........1
Joost, 2b..... 4
Myers, ss......... 4
Derringer, p......0
Moore, p .........2
Craft, zz ..........1
Riddle, p .........0
Totals .........34

R
0
0
0
1
2
1
1
1
1
7

H
2
2
0
1-
2
2
1
0
0
10

0
2
2
4
4
7
3
0
4
1
27

A
0
3
0
1
0
5
2
0
11

020 000-7

R
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

H
1
1
2
0.
1
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
8

O
1
2
1
7
2
9
0
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
27

A
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
1
0
0
8

Buck Newsom
Allows 8 Hits
In Series Win
Second-Inning Rally Nets
Detroit Five Runs; York,
CampbellPace Attack
(Continued from Page 1)
attack and the failure of Derringer,
their surest pitching bet, was heart-
breaking to Cincinnati players and
their followers.
Derringer had performed hurling
wonders against American League
batters for many years, in the World
Series and the All-Star games.
Tomorrow the Reds will have to
come out with Buck Walters, whose
record of 22 and 10 is not much bet-
ter than Derringer's 20 and 12 and
whose fast sinker proved a delight
to the Yankees a year ago. Whetherj
he can stop the Tigers was problem-
atical and whether it would do any
good to slow them up was doubtful.
The Tigers had Schoolboy Rowe,
hero of Detroit's last two trips into
the big baseball classic, ready to go
to the mound. He won 16 and lost
only 3 during the regular season and
although incapable of working as
often as Newsom, has generally been
more effective.
Tebbetts Will Catch
He will have Birdie Tebbetts, a
better catcher than Sullivan, work-
ing with him. Sullivan, a left-hand-
ed batter who usually catches New-
som, went hitless today as did Char-
ley Gehringer.
But Frank McCormick, the clean-
up man and only "power" hitter in
the Reds' lineup, failed to get even
one hit, being blanked with Wilson,
Myers and all the pitchers and
pinch-hitters McKechnie used.
The "deacon" disclosed in the
dressing room after the game that he
had no hope of using Ernie Lom-
bardi, his lumbering but hard-hit-
ting catcher.

Cincinnati ..

Faces Reds Today

.000 100 010-2

Call Is Still Bothered By Ankle

z-Batted for Wilson in 7th.
zz-Batted for Moore in 8th.

DETROIT ......050
CINCINNATI ... 000

020 000-7
100 010-2

Lynwood (Schoolboy) Rowe,
leading American League pitcher
with 16 wins and 3 losses, will face
Cincinnati in today's Series game.
I-M Offers Class
In Weight-Lifting
Increased emphasis will be placed
on instruction in this year's Intra-
mural schedule. The department
will begin this phase of its program
next week with a series of classes
in weight-lifting.
Frank Doe, of Rochester, N. Y.,
will conduct the classes from 3:30 to
5:30 p.m. every day next week. All
students interested are eligible for
instruction, and should enroll at the,
Activities Office in the Sports Build-
ing.
Others sports in which instruction
will be offered are archery, badmin-
ton, boxing, codeball, fencing, golf,
gymnastics, handball, necatos, pad-
dleball, riding, rifle shooting, skat-
ing, squash, swimming, wrestling,
and Sigma Delta Psi requirements.
Badger Players Injured
MADISON, Wis., Oct. 2.-(P)--One
by one Coach Stuhldreher is losing
the men he counted on for his first
team.

The battle for the wingback post
on Michigan's grid team that raged
during the entire pre-seagon train-
ing period has been touched off
anew with even greater fury since
Norm Call, junior speedster who had
clinched the berth, incurred an an-
kle injury in the California contest.
The chances for Call to start
against Michigan State here Satur-
day are becoming more remote every
day. At first it was believed his an-
kle would round into shape rapidly,
but instead of responding to treat-
ment, however, it 'still bothers him
considerably. Although in uniform
at practice yesterday, Call was forced
to abstain from contact work, limp-
ing along on the sidelines watching
his teammates drill for the Spartans.
The player who replaced Call in
the California tilt, sophomore Bob
Kresja, seems at the present time to
have the inside track in the three-
cornered fight for the vacant post,
with Davie Nelson and Paul Kromer
pressing close behind.
Kresja's talent for knocking down
defensive opponents rates him an
edge, for in Fritz Crisler's coaching
system the wingback is primarily a
blocking back.
Junior Davie Nelson has had more
experience than Kresja and is also
a better runner, but his small stature
is a handicap. Davie gained 50 yards
in nine attempts against California,
however, and will probably see plen-
ty of action against the Spartans.
Regular halfback and running
There will be a meeting of all
men interested in varsity track at
4:30 p.m. today in Yost Field
House.
- Coach Ken Doherty

RUDY SMEJA
ence Hall made his first appearance
in a spot strange to him, the pivot
position. Elmer Madar, Bob Smith,
Ted Denise; all participated in the
overwhelming triumph.
But- it's unfair to single out any
of them for individual performances.
It was undeniably a team victory-
one that may be repeated often if
these gridmen produce in the future
as they did in their initial test.
Cubs Even City Series
CHICAGO, Oct. 2.--()-The Chi-
cago Cubs, given a seven-hit pitching
performance by rookie Vern Olsen
and some wobbly defensive work by
their American League opponents,
defeated the White Sox, 8 to 2, to-
day.
SPORTS STAFF TRYOUTS
All sophomores and second se-
mester freshmen interested in
working on the sports staff of The
Michigan Daily will meet at 4 p.m.
today on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building on
Maynard St.

mate of Tom Harmon's two years
ago, Paul Kromer is still a question
mark. His knee injury prevented
himt from making the air jaunt to
the Pacific Coast, and it is problem-
atical whether or not he will be in
top condition for State.
In passing drill yesterday all three
saw some action at the wingback
post. The aerial plays, run off
against a red-shirted third-string
eleven, were not clicking well, and
pleased neither the coaches nor the
gridders.
The squad also received another
dose of Spartan Notre Dame forma-
tions, stopping them with little diffi-
culty.
FROSH TRACK CANDIDATES
All freshmen interested in track
report at Ferry Field any afternoon.
Experience is not necessary.
Coach C. C. Stackhouse

/0"

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Errors---Werber, Myers, Bartell,
Baker. Runs Batted In-Higgins 2,
Bartell 2, McCosky, Campbell 2, Rip-
ple, Goodman. Two Base Hits-M.
McCormick, Goodman, Werber.
Three Base Hit-York. Home Run-
Campbell. Sacrifice-Campbell. Dou-
ble Plays-Wilson and Joost; Hig-
gins, Gehringer and York. Losing
Pitcher-Derringer.
FRESHMAN GOLFERS
All varsity and freshmen golfers
report between 1:00 and 3:00 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday at the Uni-
versity golf course.
Coach Ray Courtright
don wirtckaf ter's
Two husky legs canme charging
down the Ferry Field cinders.
With baseball interest at its peak,
and the Wolverine grid squad in the
midst of prepartions for the home
dbut, normally we wouldn't have
paid much attention to those sturdy,
rapidly-moving pins. After all, the
track season is still months off.
But when we looked to see who
was running above that pair of legs,
the situation suddenly changed. For
it was sophomore Bob Uer, boys
and girls, the tremendous question
mark of last year's yearling track
squad.
Let me bring back those days
of indecision that came last spring.
Ufer, as you probably recall, had
broken more records than he ordi-
nary drunk at a fraternity victro-
la dance. He could run the dashes,
middle distance races ando relays
with prodigious timings. He was
counted upon for big things when
the 1941 cinder season rolled a-
round.
But Pfer was a husky lad, and he
wanted to try to play football. Last
fall, he had won his numerals with
the frosh gridders. He wasn't a star
with Wally Weber charges. No, he
neve rhad the natural ability to
carry the pigskin. And yet with his
speed and power, the experts couldn't
help but feel that with a little teach-
ing and experience, the lad could de-
velop into something rather great.
Football, track or both, that was
WHILE THEY LAST
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A

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the question for Bob Ufer last spring.
Well, yesterday it became evident
to me that Ufer had made his deci-
sion. Those sturdy pair of pins that
I saw turning up the Ferry Field
cinders will be gathering points for
Ken Doherty this winter instead of
Fritz Crisler this fall.
Frankly, I think it's the wisest
decision that any man in Ufer's
boots could have possibly made.
Just look oback over the athletic
history, and you'll see that there
have been very few boys who were
able to successfully double in track
and football.
Take the case of Fred 'King' Kel-
ley, fo rexample. He used to hurdle
and sprint rather well for Southern
Cal, and because of his speed he
was given a backfield berth on the
Trojan eleven.
But that was a fatal move for the
King. Everytime he attempted to
charge the line, Kelley unconscious-
ly would begin thinking about those
fragile pins that had won him so
many headlines just the season be-
fore. As a result, he would hesi-
tate, fall behind his blockers and fall
before his tacklers.
This kept on for quite awhile, but
they left him in the lineup because
Kelley "was potentially a gridiron
star with his speed and power."
But the Trojan followers got fed
up with the situation. They called
their track star yellow. They booed
him on the gridiron. Little did
they know what was going on in-
side Kelley everytime he handled
the ball.
So the King made up his mind to

remedy the situation. In the Oregon
game that year, he swore to do or
die. Forget about those legs, he
pleaded with himself. Drive, drive.
And that he did. Right into the
line, and on the first play he broke
his right leg. Track and football
both had little use of Kelley from
that time on.
There have been others just like
him, too. Howard Drew, the fastest
sprinter in his generation, Thuck
Miller of Harvard, Chester Bowman
from Syracuse and Bill Miller, the
Princeton speedster, were alletrack-
men who failed on the gridiron. El-
mer Gedeon tried it her just a few
years back, but you could hardly
call him a star at football.
Sure, you can point to Carlysle's
great Indian, Jim Thorpe, and No-
tre Dame's Jack Elder. They both
doubled and did it successfully. But
as you recall, these men were both
gridders in the main, and run-
ners as a sideline. And there lies
your difference. These men learned
to swerve and dodge long before
they learned to run in a straight
line. They never had to hesitate.
It is interesting to note that out
Stanford way these days, Clyde Jef-
fries, the Golden West's great sprint-
er, is working with Clark Shaugh-
nessy's Indian eleven. They say that
he shows a whale of a lot of promise.
But remember again that Ufer
and Jeffries are in different boats.
The Stanford flash has already
reached his peak and started the
down turn in the track empire.
The Wolverine kid is just starting.
Ii1

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