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November 30, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-30

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Y, NOVEMBER 30, 1940

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hockey

Team Faces London A.C. InOpener Here

Tonight
Tom Harm on To Get
'The lierries-To Eat

v

Three Starting.
Positions Held
By Newcomers
Wingmen Kemp, Bahrych,
Goalie Loud Scheduled
To MakeVarsity Debut
(Continued from Page 1)
Michigan squad, will play though the
majority of the game' without re-
placements. Stodden and Ross are
both rough, hard-checking hockey
players and both can be counted on
to furnish an occasional thrill with
solo dashes down the ice.
The second forward line will be
made up of Jim Lovett and Johnny
Corson, both veterans, with newcom-
er Jimmy Anderson completing the
trio. Bob Collins and Gil Samuelson
will team with Fred Heddle or John-
ny Gillis on a third front line. Hugh
McVeigh, spare goalie, will be in uni-
form and stands a good chance of
getting into the fray before the night
is over.
While the Wolverines are improved,
the Londoners are not to be consid-
ered a soft touch since they will also
present a vastly improved lineup.
With only four veterans present on
a squad of 13, youth and speed are
the keynotes of the visiting club.
Pat Barrett, husky defense man,
Bill Legg, speedy right winger, and
Stan Butler, high-scoring center, will
provide the bulwark of the visitor's
opening lineup. Butler scored two of
London's three goals against the Wol-
verines last year. Hal Moffatt will be
in the nets for London while new-
comers'Taylor and McLoud will com-
plete the starting lineup.
STARTING LINEUPS
Michigan Pos. London A. C.
Loud G Moffatt
Ross D Taylor
Stodden 'D Barrett
Goldsmith C Butler
Bahrych W Legg
Kemp W McLoud
All prospective Varsity pitchers
who would like to loosen the kinks
in their throwing arms for the
coming baseball season are urged
to work out daily from 1:15 to
3:30 at the Yost Field House.
Ray Fisher, Varsity Coach

Wolverine Stalwart

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Intramural
Angles
By Gene Gribbroek
Twelve Residence Hall hockey
teams have started play in their first,
season of regular competition. Three
four-team leagues are battling for
playoff positions, two in the West'
Quadrangle and the third including
the three new East Quad undergrad-
uate houses and Fletcher Hall.
The Independent touch football
grown, only one of the fall sport
titles yet undecided, will be on the
line Sunday morning when Robert
Owen League A champs, face the
Hillbilly eleven, League B winners
defending the championship it
won last year. The tilt will take
place at 10:30 at Wines Field.
Owen advanced to the finals by
virtue of a 25-0 win over the C & C
Packers, League C entry. Werner
Wassmansdorf, Owen end, added
three touchdowns to his 19 point sea-
son's total in the game to lead the
division's scorers. Harold Ehlers,
halfback, tossed two passes to Wass-
mansdorf and one to Bernie Tauber
to take part in three scores.
* * *
Williams House won its first
championship Monday when it took
the West Quad League II volleyball
title. Williams is scheduled to meet
Wihchell House,-League II winners,
for the right to face Fletcher Hall's
League III champs for the Resi-
dence Hall crown. The entire play-
offs will take place Monday night.
** *
Lloyd House has gotten away to a
lead in the race for the Michigan
Union Bowling Trophy, with a record
of 14 wins against one defeat thus
far. George Jaquillard, of Winchell
House, has carded a 237, the highest
individual game of the young season.

Hilarious Antics Delight Spectators'
At Matt Mann 's Annual Swim Show

(Continued from Page 1)Y
smooth, powerful butterfly stroke car-
ried him to the finish a good fivet
lengths in front of the field.L
In the 75-yard free style event,
Gus Sharemet, the sensation of the1
nation last year, just nipped formerj
National titleholder Charley Barker
in 38.5 seconds. Claire, Morse was
third.
When the back stroke race was
about to start, a fully clothed stran-
ger toppled into the water followed by
no less than seven varsity men. After
five minutes of frantic searching they
gave up. This touched off the fun-
fest. At the latest reports they were
calling out a dragnet for the stranger,
who it is rumored was Bill Holmes.
Beebe Wins Backstroke
But this excitement didn't phase
Capt. Bill Beebe who streaked his
way across the pool in 1:04.2 in the
100 yard backstroke, leading Dick
Riedl and Ted Horlenko.
The crowd's attention was then
drawn to a plumber who started
pounding the diving board unmerci-
fully. Matt Mann pointed high up to
the ceiling where a light was out.
"There's the trouble," he said.
Two minutes later a satchel
dropped out of the roof followed by
two legs and a body. It was the
plumber all right, and he chased his
tool kit into the pool from his lofty
perch 'to the delight of the blood
thirsty mob.
Comic, Diver Pleases
Clayton Mains, the comic diver,
lived up to all expectations as he
burlesqued his way to the audience's
heart in a peppermint-striped, pat-
ched up beach suit. His "Swan Dive"
and "Flat-foot-floogie-with-a-skid-
skid" were sights to behold. When
he belly-flopped into the water on

his "half-gainer" the reverberations
must have been felt in Ypsilanti.
T-Bone Martin, Bill Beamer, Al
Canja and Lou Haughey put on a
dazzling display of collegiate caliber
diving that left mouths gaping and
hands clapping. Earlier in the eve-
ning Betty Burton, Martha Blair,

because someone pulled Prof. Fries'
mustache.j
Will Garvey and Paul Clifford add-
ed insult to injury as they teamed
together to upset the prexy duo of
Frank Walaitis and Barny Hughes in
the tilting contest. The faculty raft
sprung a leak in the second round
and they limped to shore-badly
beaten.

Youngster In Exhibition
Bill Gail and little Peter Fries were
just two more personalities who had
the audience in an uproar. Bill put#
on a courageous diving exhibition
doing the front dive, half gainer, and
one and a half gainer with near-
perfection.
Peter Fries, however, wasn't so
anxious to display his wares. Three
years old, standing not more than
three feet high, little Pete didn't go
for the audience. His brother hadI
to shove him into the water and asI
he treaded after his dad across the'
pool, the hushed crowd could hear
him pleading, "I don' wanna." But
he made the length and retired for
the evening.
In other races during the evening
Louis Kivi won the freshman 100 yard
free style race in 54.1-Jim Welsh,
Bruce Allen, Jack Patten and Kivi
presented the "Evolution of Swim-
ming"-Patten beat out Welsh and
Dobson Burton in a thrilling 200-
yard race in 2:02. Charley Barker
pulled his team from behind to tie
Gus Sharemet in the 150 yard medley
relay.

MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 29-.P)--Af-
tcr a debate conducted with mock
solemnity, City aldermen approved
a motion today to send two crates of
raspberries-the edible variety-to
Tommy Harmon.
Recently in a radio talk Harmon
said that Michigan should have beat-
en Minnesota by three touchdowns.
Minnesota won, 7-6.
Before approving the motion, the
aldermen amended it to have the
two aldermen who proposed it foot
the bill. Aldermen Stanley Anderson
and W. J. Meagher cheerfully agreed.
*
*
* FRATERNITY 0
*$
* JEWELRY
0 0
s is the 0
O S
0 Perfect gift i
* 0
* 0
0, 0
Burr, Patterson & Auld
1209 South University
0 Ruitt ANN OAKES, Mgr. 0
0 0

Bert Stodden, veteran defense-
man, will probably be called on to
perform an iron-man role in the
Varsity's opener, against the Lon-
don A.C. tonight because of a
shortage of defensemen.

Navy Favored
To Sink Army
In Grid Classic
NEW YORK, Nov. 29.-(A)-Ex-'
pept for a few scattered engagements
between beaten teams next week,
college football bows out tomorrow
and leaves the various "Bowl" com-
mittees to put on their annual tug-
of-war for the prize elevens.
But the big game of the day will
have no bowl significance. It will
bring together Army and Navy for
the 41st time at Philadelphia's Mu-
nicipal Stadium with a sell-out crowd
of 102,000 in prospect.
Army Holds Series Edge
The Cadets hold a 22-16 margin,
with three ties; in the series that
started in 1890, but the Middies are
favored to make it two straight over
an Army team that has beaten only
Williams and tied Harvard this sea-
son.
At least one participant in the Rose
Bowl on New Year's Day probably
will be decided beyond doubt in the
West Coast meeting between unbeat-
en, untied Stanford and the Califor-
nia Bears. Stanford is strongly fa-
vored to complete a perfect season
and become an automatic choice for
the big blow-off at Pasadena.
Vols Meet Vanderbilt
The Tennessee Volunteers, strong
contenders for the honor of either
representing*the East a second
straight time in the' Rose Bowl or
playing in the Sugar Bowl, complete
their schedule against the weak Van-
derbilt Commodores and appear a
,inch to wind up their third consecu-
tive perfect season against southern
opposition.
Boston College, all victorious up
to this point and heading straight
for the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans
on New Year's Day, finishes against
its old rival, Holy Cross. The cru-
saders do not look good enough to
check Coach Frank Leahy's Huskies.
The Fordham Rams, practically
certain of an invitation to Miami's
Orange Bowl despite their single loss
to St. Mary's in mid-season, hope to
make an impressive showing against
their local rivals, New York Univer-
sity, at Yankee Stadium.

COACH MATT MANN
... swim impressario
Michigan AAU champ and Raymond
Root also put on a beautiful exhibi-
tion.
The faculty, as motley a crew as
ever wriggled into a bathing suit,
turned the pool into a thrashing mad-
house with their water polo match.
They had more fun ducking each
other than playing polo-although
they finished the game in a 1-1 tie.
The battle was played under protest

Matmen At Work

.. .Four Lettermen Return

By STAN CLAMAGE

v-

DO YOUR,
CHRISTMAS
SHOPPING
EARLY!

The grunt and groaners are at it
again at the Yost Field House as
Coach Cliff Keen is preparing to
present the 1940-41 edition of his
varsity wrestling squad. Led by Capt.
Bill Combs, the men are gradually
getting into shape for the coming
season.
Coach Keen's present job of get-
ting together a team is no easy task.
It is obvious that the loss of last
year's wrestlers will be felt. It isn't
every day that men like Captain
"Butch" Jordan, Harland Danner,
and National Intercollegiate Cham-
pion Don Nichols come around.
Keen will have as a nucleus four
returning lettermen: Tom Weidig,
Bill Combs, Jim Galles, and Johnny
Paup.
The men who are working out for
the coming season number over 50
and it appears that the competition
for positions on the team will be keen.
Varsity tackles Rudy Sengel, Al
Wistert, and Jack Butler, in addition
to John Wilson, are competing for
Champ Billy Conn Beats
Savold In Non-Title Bout
NEW YORK, Nov. 29-(A)-Billy
Conn of Pittsburgh punched out a
twelve-round dedision over Lee Sa-
vold of Des Moines, Iowa, before a
crowd of 12,000 fans in Madison
Square tonight.
The fight was a slow affair through
the first eight rounds, but wound up
in the stretch as a tough, bruising
battle of left hooks.

the heavyweight post. At 175 pounds
are Emil Lockwood and Jim Galles,
last year's sensational sophomore.

Ed Wight, dnd Marvin Becker. Ray
Deane and Bob Begle are the 136
pound aspirants. Fred Klemach ap-
pears to be the only prospect at 128
pounds. a class which has been a
problem for Coach Keen for the past
two seasons. Tom Weidig and Har-
vey Littleton head the 121 pound
group.
As yet, no definite schedule of dual
meets has been arranged, but Coach
Keen says that one will be drawn
up at the annual coaches meeting,
December 4.
Keen is anticipating sending a
team to compete in the Midwestern
AAU tournament which is to be held
in Chicago December 13-14. This is
the largest tournament of its kind
in point of competition that is held.

Iiu

Don't wait until the last
minute - select these gifts
NOW!
* Genuine Leather Zipper Note-
books - $'.99 to $10.00.
" Stationery -= 25c to $2.50.
* Bill Folds - 50c to $5.00.
" Scrap Books - 50c to $3.95.
" Photo Albums - 50c to $3.50.
" Michigan Felt Animals - 97c to
$3.95.
" Michigan Jewelry - 75c to $3.00.
" Fountain Pen & Pencil Sets -
$1.95 to $19.95 (Shaeffer and
Parker).
Hundreds of other things
to choose from.
We Will Pay the Postage
& Mail All Gifts Purchased
at
FO LLETT'S

CAPT. BILL COMBS
... leads grapplers

Competing at 155 pounds are Cap-
tain Combs, "Hap" Langstaff, Waldo
West, Johnny Paup and Art Brady.
At 145 pounds are Phil Detwiler,

1111

U

moeildlimmililllion

inmoniummmnimuI

SPORTS CLINIC SCHEDULE
SATURDAY, NOV. 30
Basketball Clinic ......10:00 a.m.
......Main Gymnasium.
17th Annual Basketball Rules
Meeting, three sections:
10:00 a.m.-Sports Building.
Demonstration by "Bunny"
Leavitt, of Harlem Globe
Trotters.
12:15 p.m.-Michigan Union
Ballroom. Speaker: Former
Governor Wilbur M. Bruck-
er, "Athletics in the Mich-
igan Program for National
Defense.",
2:00 p.m.--Rackham Build-
ing. Motion Pictures and
Rules Discussions.
f

ITS A W
RK.
O0N 114A
M tc+.-

SUNDAY
SUP'PE R
December 1, 1940
Golden Brown Waffle
Maple Syrup
Grilled Sausage Pattie
Baked Apple or Ice Cream
Beverage
50c
Chef's Salad Bowl
Toasted Cheese Sandwich
Pineapple Layer Cake
or Pistachio Nut Ice Cream
Beverage
50c
Chicken Tetrazzini in Casserole
Brussels Sprouts
Plum Pudding or Cherry Pie
Beverage
60~e
Consom me
Roast Leg of Lamb, Mint Jelly
Mashed Potatoes
Baby Green Lima Beans
Cocoanut Cream Pie
or Strawberry Sundae
Beverage
75e
GOOD FOOD
Excellent Service
6 to 7:30 o'clock
MAIN
DINING ROOM

I

'I wan~t a gift that will
KEEP ON GIVING
jef eaSco me.
"I believe in giving my wife something sensible for
Christmas. She's a practical person . . . says she
wants something that she'll use every day, that
won't be forgotten after the holidays.
"Well, she won't forget THIS gift. An electric range
is a gift thatlasts. She's always wanted one-and
it tops the list for usefulness. Do I sound selfish?
You're wrong. There's sentiment wrapped up in my
choice. Anything that lightens her job of cooking
meals shows thoughtfulness and consideration. I
know-I've tried getting meals myself."
The man's right. When you bring the magic of elec-
tricity into your home, you open up a whole new
world. Tireless, quiet, inexpensive servants take over
your household drudgery. Electric cooking and electric
water heating lift two major burdens from your wife's
shoulders. This Christmas, be one of the thousands
who have learned a simple truth: The gifts that give
the most are the gifts that serve the best. . .The
Detroit Edison Company.

It's the last of the

I

I

"R" Months
From the clear, cold waters on the coast of Maine we bring you
the choicest lobsters. From the waters of Chesapeake Bay we

YOUR DEALER has electric ranges and water heat-
ers on display. Stop in today-on sale at HARDWARE
STORES, FURNITURE AND DEPARTMENT STORES,
AND ELECTRICAL DEALERS.

1

bring you the finest
peak of flavor during

Blue Points. These delicacies reach their
the 'R" months, so enjoy them now before

Ii

the season's gone. I

II

i

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