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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 28, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Famous Films
Of Bygone Era
Will Be Shown
Run Of Pictures To Begin
Dec. 15; Ticket Sale
To OpenNext Week
A new series of four famous old
films dating from the Keystone com-
edies to the first of the popular gang-
ster epics will be shown in Ann Arbor
starting Dec. 15, under the auspices
of the Art Cinema League, Albert
Stutz, Grad., announced yesterday.
The tickets for the moving-pictures
will go on sale next week, and will be
sold as a complete group for $1.
The showing dates are to fall on Sun-
day evenings and the pictures will
be shown at 8:15 p.m. in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. Since the last
Art Cinema Series proved to be a
sell-out with students unable to ob-
tain seats, Stutz has urged those
planning to attend to reserve tickets
early. -
First to be featured will be Charlie
Chaplin in a program of five Key-
stone Comedies on Dec. 15, followed
by "The Unholy Three," with Lon
Chaney, on Jan. 19. Although both
these films are silent, they will be
provided with musical scores.
The world-famous war film "The
Big Parade," with John Gilbert and
an all-star cast of old-timers, will be
shown here Feb. 2, and the last in
the series will be "Little Caesar," a
comparatively recent gangster film
starring Edward G. Robinson. All of
the pictures will be supplemented
with selected short subjects.
ASCAP Offers Award
For Best Musical Play
For the second time this year the
American Society of. Composers, Au-
thors and Publishers is holding its
Fellowship Competition for composers
and authors of college musical plays.
The award of $720 for each of the
eight districts of the country will be
given to the student submitting the
best long musical play.
One of the requirements for the
play is that it be fully cast, costumed
and produced before at least 200 peo-
ple. Judgment will be based on the
script, however, and not on the per-
formance.
Last year's Mimes Opera "Four Out
of Five" was entered in the ASCAP
competition. The scripts for "Take
A Number," forthcoming Mimes Op-
era, as well as "Jumping Jupiter!",
Junior Girls Project, now being pre-
pared for production, are also eligible.

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Atlas Of World Review' Helps
Understanding Of World Affairs

By ROBERT MANTHO
Pity the poor map-maker! With
the world situation what it is today,
the tedious art of cartography is not
an enviable one.
In view of the rapid-changing
boundaries of countries the recent
achievement of Clifford H. MacFad-
den of the geography department is
to be more commended. For, under
the tremendous difficulties imposed
by the present war, he has succeeded
in having publised "An Atlas of
World Review," consisting of 160
maps which are invaluable to persons
interested or concerned in world af-
fairs of today and tomorrow.
This handy little book, in its yel-
low and red cover-jacket, is a
good thing to have at your side when
you sit down to read a newspaper or
a magazine. In it are to be found such
facts of interest as the-world's "hot
spots," the fight for petroleum and
rubber, U.S. industries, U.S. raw ma-
terial deficiencies and bombing time
ranges. The maps will help no end
in giving, the ordinary layman an
accurate picture of the trend of
events and will eliminate much con-
fusion in the popular mind at the
same time.
"An Atlas of World Review'' is
being used as a required supplemen-
tary textbook in all courses of politi-
cal geography at the University. It is
Dr. Gamoran
To Speak Here
Religious Education To Be
Subject Of Lecture
Dr. Emanuel Gamoran, director of
the American Hebrew Congregations,
will speak at 4:15 p.m. Friday at Lane
Hall, on "Religious Education in a
Democracy," Dr. Edward Blakeman,
counselor of religious education, an-
nounced.
Dr. Gamoran is the author of the
"Changing Conceptions in Jewish
Education" and "Teacher Training in
Jewish Schools." He has also been
active as the editor of textbooks in
Jewish history and literature.
The series of conferences which
Dr. Gamoran will initiate will deal
with a restudy of the precepts and
techniques of religious education.
The first speaker will be followed
by Prof. Harrison S. Elliott, chair-
man of religious education of the
United States and Canada and au-
thor of the new text entitled, "Can
Religious Education Be Christian." In
February Prof. Clarence P. Shedd
of the religious education department
at Yale University, will deliver an
address at Lane Hall.

already being pushed as a semi-pop-
ular publication, since it was de-
signed and written to serve that very
double purpose for which it is now
being used.
Mr. MacFadden spent ten months
:)f actual work on the Atlas, com-
mencing last Nov 15. Publication was
delayed for some time and the book
appeared in print last week.
Commenting on what gave rise 'to
the Atlas, the author gave Prof R. B.
Hall of the geography department
credit for "sowing the seeds of the
undertaking." Prof. Hall has written
a brief introduction to the book.
As to the accuracy of his predic-
tions for the future, Mr. MacFadden
expressed satisfaction. "I have been
quite consistent so far in my prog-
nostications, but exactness, of course,
cannot be expected with 100 per cent
accuracy," he stated.
According to the cartographer, the
biggest headaches for map-makers
in times of war can be briefly sum-
marized as follows: (1) getting source
materials that will agree; (2) try-
ing to track down the accuracy of
information passed out to newspap-
ers and magazines; (3) attempting
to determine what is going to be im-
portant in the near future; and (4)
trying to ascertain what all official
releases from nations at war really
mean.
Another difficulty, which is an ev-
ery-day affair, is to realize when a
map has sufficient detail so that the
map will bring out its point., Mr.
MacFadden concluded.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)

Men's Varsity
Debate Squad
Is Announced
Illinois Wesleyan, Indiana,
Purdue And Ohio State
Teams Are Selected
Members of the Varsity Men's De-
bate teams who will participate in
the season's Western Conference
meetings were announced yesterday
by Mr. Arthur Secord of the speech
department, director of the activity.
The two debates outside the Con-
ference program will be with Illinois
Wesleyan here Dec. 3. Merle Webb,
'42, and Matthew Zipple, '42Ed., will
comprise the affirmative team and
Chester Myslicki, '42, and Thomas
Dahrymple, '42, will uphold the nega-
tive against the opposing Illinois
teams before speech classes, on the
question, "Resolved: That the powers
of the Federal Government should be
increased."
William Halliday, '43, and Phillip
Levy, '43, will meet an Indiana team
here Dec. 6 on the question, "Re-
solved: That the powers of the Fed-
eral Government should be de-
creased." They will support the nega-
tive.
A Purdue University team will be
opposed by John Huston, '41, and Ar-
thur L. Biggins, Dec. 6.

Member Tells Varied Activities
Of Catholic W orkers Movement

Here Is
T,.

Today's

Ann Arbor

News

A group of Catholic workmen try-
ing to carry out Catholic social ac-
tion-that is the Catholic Workers
Movement as defined by Harold Sul-
livan, worker in the group, in a re-
cent interview here.
The movement started about nine
years ago in New York, Sullivan ex-
plained, and consists of work in labor
groups, coopertives, various racial
groups and pacifist organizations to
,romote the ends of these organiza-
tions, which are the aims of the
social action they are trying to carry
out
'Houses Of Hospitality'
Other activities of the movement
are carried out directly by the work-
ers, Sulivan said, who care for in-
digent and ill people of all races and
religions in the group's "Houses of
Hospitality." These Houses are sup-
ported by friends of the movement
and provide medical care and shelter
to those requiring help. There are
now 36 Houses in various cities of the
country.
"We also operate eight farming
communes," Sullivan added, "and
these are run on a cooperative basis.
There is one in Michigan, attached
to the Detroit House of Hospitality."
The Catholic Workers labor work
consists in encouraging people to
join labor unions, Sullivan said. "We
support those strikes that we think
are just," he revealed, "as in - the
case of the seamen's strike two years
ago when we housed the strikers."
Because they feel that "coopera-
tives are the only really democratic
means to erase economic disorder"
according to Sullivan, the Catholic
Workers help spread "cooperative
propaganda" among workers.
Spreading Tolerance
By cooperating with the Round
Table Conference of Christian and
Jews, as well as other organizations
for the promotion of inter-religious
and inter-racial fellowship, the
movement has endeavored to spread
tolerance, Sullivan said. "The farms
and houses are open to colored and
white alike," he emphasized.
"The Catholic Worker," the official
organ of the movement, opposed con-
scription and members work with 'the

ellowship of Reconciliation and the
Youth Committee Against War in
carrying out the pacifist ideals of the
movement, Sullivan stated. Also the
movement sponsors a group of con-
scientious objectors, known as "Pax."
Sullivan is at present on a speak-
ing tour for the movement, discussing
methods of dealing with people in
slum districts and low income groups,
mostly with college audiences. He
was formerly head of the Boston
House and is now working from New
York.
Liquefied Air
Demonstrated
By Dr. Brown
Dr. Oliver L. I. Brown, of the chem-
istry department, demonstrated the
properties of liquefied air before fac-
ulty and graduate student guests at
the annual Chemistry Reception last
night in the Rackham building.
Sponsors of the reception were Phi
Lambda Upsilon, men's honorary
chemical fraternity, Iota Sigma Pi,
girls' honorary chemical sorority,
Alpha Chi Sigma, professional chem-
ical society and Rho Chi, pharma-
ceutical fraternity. The members of
Iota Sigma Pi acted as hostesses for
the affair.
Among the other features of the
reception were an exhibit of micro-
film and an exhibit of industrial plas-
tics. A directory of the graduate stu-
dents, telling their fields of research
and their undergraduate schools, was
displayed in the outer hall.
Dean C. S. Yoakum, of the Gradu-
ate School, headed the reception line,
Pharmics Elect Officers
In an election held Morday the
Class of '41P chose this year's offi-
cers. Paul E. Norris is president, Mar-
orie Kern, vice-president, William
in, treasurer, and John Gregg,
secretary.

In in ummary I
Joseph E. Huigenza. who was
known to many students on campus
when he worked as an elevator oper-
ator at the Union for several years.
received an appointment as patrol-
man on the Ann Arbor police force
yesterday. He graduated from the
state police's six-week course in Sep-
tember and held a position at the
state police post in Traverse City
since then.
John C. Biederman was selected for
a similar post at the same time. He
has been a gasoline station attendant
for five years.
* * *
$458.95 has already been contrib-
uted by residents of the county in the
Christmas seal campaign to raise
funds for the fight against tuber-
culosis Mrs. Flora Neal Brown, ex-
ecutive secretary c the Washtenaw
County branch of the state tuber-
culosis association announced yes-
terday.
The campaign will continue until
Christmas. Money received through
donations are to be used to cut down
the amount of people suffering from
tuberculosis by educating citizens to
recognize early symptoms of the dis-
ease through conducting clinics and
by early diagnosis.
Glee Club Will Rehearse
The Varsity Men's Glee Club will
hold a special Union Opera rehear-
sal at 4 p.m. Sunday in the Union in
order to practice their "Take A Num-
ber" scene.
W HE N M INU TE S
M E AN MO0N EY-
T E LE GRA PH V IA
Te legrap),
CHARGES FOR TELEGRAMS 'PHONED IN
APPEAR ON YOUR TELEPHONE BiLL.

night at 7:30 sharp in the Glee Club
room of the Union.
Orientation Advisers should turn
in Red Cross material and money to-
day at the Social Director's Office of
the League.
Scenes from "Julius Caesar": A
platform presentation of the principal
scenes of "Julius Caesar" will be given
by the class in the Oral Anterpretation
of Shakespeare (Speech 163) tonight
at 7:15 in Room 302, Mason Hall.
Persons interested are invited.
Christmas Week for China Com-
mittee will meet today at 3:00 p.m.
in Room 325 of the Union.
Alpha Nu will meet tonight in 231
Angell Hall at 7:30.
Fashions Debate between Alpha
Nu and Zeta Phi Eta will be held to-
night in 231 Angell Hall at 8:15 un-
der the title "Michigan women are
slaves of fashion to a greater extent
than Michigan men."
Kappa Phi Meeting today at Meth-
odist Church at 5:15 p.m. Miss Beise
will speak.
Ann Arbor Independents will meet
today in the Michigan League. Meet-
ing is important.

Sophomore Cabaret Date Bureau
will meet today at 5:00 p.m. in the
League. The meeting is compulsory,
Episcopal Students: The Study
Group will meet to read and discuss
A. J. Muste's "Non-Violence in an
Aggressive World" today at 5:00 p.m.
in Harris Hall.
Michigan Dames: Homemaking
Group will meet at the home of Mrs.
Ben J. Weaver, 1127 East Ann St. to-
night at 8:00 p.m.
Hillel Foundation: The regular
Thursday afternoon "P.M." will be
held at the Hillel Foundation this
afternoon from 4:00 to 6:00. All
Hillel ,nembers are invited.
The bowling alleys at the Women's
Athletic Building are open for the
season, Monday through Saturday,
3:00 to 6:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Coming Events
The Graduate Education Club will
hold an organization meeting on Fri-
day, November 29, at 4:15 p.m. in the
University Elementary School Li-
brary. All graduate students in Edu-
cation are urged to join. Refresh-
ments.
Dr. Emanuel Gamoran of Cincin-
nati is to speak upon "Religious Edu-
cation in a Democracy" at 4:15 p.m.
on Friday, November 29, at the Upper
Room in Lane Hall. An Interfaith
meeting.

.FOR CH RISTMRS
that last for gears
RECORDS
IN
ALBUMS
ROMEO & JULIET OVERTURE --TSCHAIKOWSKY
PLAYED BY KOUSSEVITZKY CONDUCTING THE
FAMOUS BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
3 RED SEAL 12" RECORDS IN ALBUM
$ 3.50
PEER GYNT -SUITE NO. 1 -GRIEG
PLAYED BY JOHN BARBIROLLI AND
ORCHESTRA ON 2 RED SEAL
RECORDS IN ALBUM
LA MER-DEBUSSY
KOUSSEVITZKY - BOSTON SYMPHONY
3 RED SEAL RECORDS IN ALBUM
SYMPHONY NO. 4 (Italian) -MENDELSSOHN
KOUSSEVITZKY - BOSTON SYMPHONY
3 RED SEAL RECORDS IN ALBUM
$3.50
FREE DELIVERY

Outdoor Sports: There will be a
meeting to organize ice-skating, ski-
ing, and tobogganing groups at the
Women's Athletic Building on Satur-
day, November 30, at 2:00 p.m. All
women students interested in partici-
pating or in instruction are invited.
Come prepared to skate.

ice- "<'\
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HAPPY
and SHAVING

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Today he

is having

his Ensian Senior
Picture taken!

As much as we're against the idea, Christmas Vacation
will begin a week late this year. It won't be until the 21st
of December that we all make that merry trek homeward
to spend the holiday season with our families and friends.
So, you'll want to do your Christmas shopping here in
Ann Arbor, where you'll have plenty of opportunity to
choose from a multitude of attractive gifts which your
merchants offer. Shop early here in Ann Arbor and avoid
that last-minute rush you always find at home.
71L .r3

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