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November 24, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDIAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1910

,' "T -
-- -
,.. _ _ -

A

On The Road
To Athens

THE

WEEK

IN

REVIEW

A New Leader
Takes Over
port of the defense program was
made" As conventions closed. AFL's
Green was still "hoping" for unity.

FOREIGN
On The Diplomatic Front

Coventry

Buries

Air Raid

Victims

AT

HOME

No Unity Yet

Lightning diplomatic and aerial
moves by Hitler last week were timed
to save the collective axis face, dis-
courage a further pro-British swing
among hard-pressed neutrals, but
Nazidom's successes only served to
throw into sharp contrast bemuddled
Mylussolini's back-firing blitzkrieg a-
gainst the Grecian hill billies.
Disheartening to war-weary Itali-
ans were reports of Greco-British vic-
tories that slipped past vigilant cen-
sors: "English boasts" that were only
partially countered by fascist dispat-
ches boasting of repulsed enemy
thrusts.
War-wise Adolf, no doubt irked by
the Duce's blundering, had reason
to take heart, for the axis glory was
still all his own. Playing the role of
a protecting father rushing to the
rescue of his protege, der Fuehrer
quickly mustered his diplomatic
trouble-shooters to pave the way for
a German rescue stunt.
Molotov Negotiates
First to "consult" the sage of Berg-
tesgardens was strong man Stalin's
ace negotiator, Premier Mikhailovich
Molotov. Turkey was straining at the
end of the Russian apron string, and
Hitler was anxious to spike the guns
of the Dardannelles before Istanbul
took heart in the Grecian victories.
In return for his influence, bargain-
driving Stalin wanted certain con-
cessions in the Balkans. Whether
such a bargain was terminated in
Berlin last week few men know, and
none would tell.
More publicized last week was the
Vienna conference between Ribben-
trop and Hungarian Foreign. Minister

Count Stephen Czaky. Long an axis
silent partner, Hungary surprised no
one by formally signing a protocol
with the axis and Japan. Significant
however, was the timing of the move,
for through Hungary lies the road to
Greece.
Further confirmation of Hitler's in-
tent followed the Vienna conference
with the announcement that Nazi-
friendly Rumanian Premier-dictator
General Ion Antonescu,giad conclud-
ed a pact with Germany, while close
on his heels followed Bulgarian and
Slovakian envoys Tuka and Philoff.
Route To Greece
With Hungary, Rumania and Bul-
garia tucked away in the over-flow-
ing Axis Grab Bag, the Reichswehr
will have a direct route to Greece's
northwest flank, but several matters
yet need diplomatic attention before
the tanks can roll. Menacing the cor-
ridor to Greece are three ominous po-
tential foes: Russia to the northwest,
Turkey to the southwest or Yugoslav-
ia to the east could seriously hamper
a German drive down 'the narrow
lane to Greece.
Nor have recent indications of Tur-
kish attitude given Germany much
cause for rejoicing. Immediately fol-
lowing Molotov's hurried conference
with Hitler, Turkish spokesmen were
quick to announce that Turkey was
teady to defend her integrity, hint-
ing that Istanbul was more than a
Russian chessmate.
In anticipation of a Nazi thrust
through Bulgaria, martial law was
already declared in sectors near the
Dardennelles; Istanbul was ready to
bargain or fight.
-Karl Kessler

While anti-aircraft guns barked at a lone German raider, 172 of
some 300 persons killed in the devastating overnight raid on Coventry,
England, were buried in a common grave.

AERIAL

WARFARE

4

C t
To'day and in
Monday ON STAGE Person

Over England
Hard hit industrial Midland dis-
tricts last week again took the telling
blows of Goering's luftwaffe: raids
which took the usual toll on indus-
trial plants and rail centers, chalked
up new all-time highs in civilian cas-
ualtie
First and most widely mutilated
was ancient Coventry, once the
stamping ground of Lady Godiva and
now the Detroit of England. Into
long rows of smcke-stained, over-
crowded workmen's houses Nazi air-
men dumped ton after ton of explo-
sive and incendiary bombs. For hours,
lean and weary workmen huddled
with wives and children in cramped
bomb shelters, havens which all too
often became tombs for scores.
When the smoke cleared, the mor-
bid tally began: with some 500 tons
of high explosives and 30 tons of in-
cendiary bombs, the waves of bombers
had killed well over 1,000, maimed
untold others, and reduced square
mile upon square mile to smouldering
ruin. Blasted to mere rubble was
once-proud fourteenth century St.
Michael's cathedral.
An enraged British press charged
the Germans with indescriminate
civilian bombing. Conscience un-
daunted, Berlin replied that the raids
were mere retaliation for RAF bom-
bardment of Munich while Hitler
spoke, and raids on Danzig on the
Molotov route to Berlin.
In return, British airmen leveled
haymakers at German industrial
areas. Principle objectives were Ber-
lin rail depots, Hamburg and Bremen
shipyards, the Kiel naval base, Skoda
and Krupp munitions plants.

Over Italy
Bomb-racked Britons and defend-
ing Greeks alike took heart when the
Royal Navy last week proceeded to
show Il Duce that the Mediterranean
may better be dubbed "Cunningham's
Pond" than "Mare Nostrum."
Tired of waiting for the elusive
Italian navy to come into the open
for a show-down, Admiral Cunning-
ham last week struck a bold blow, and
sent Mussolini's fleet into a neutral
corner. Bottling his opponent in Tar-
anto harbor, Cunningham loosed
scores of torpedo-carrying planes,
sent many a hull to the bottom, and
finished the job with a thorough
shelling of vital dry docks.
With the RAF now well based on
newly acquired Greek islands in the
Mediterranean, southern Italy began
to feel the brunt of modern warfare.
Naples, Brindisi, in addition to Tar-
anto have already been hosts to the
RAF.
Jubilant Greeks last week had good
cause for joy, but optimism was well
mixed with apprehension. Thought-
ful Athenians registered joy over
Greek successes on the northern
front, optimism over the effectiveness
of British aid in the Mediterranean,
but apprehension for Germany's drive
through the Balkans.
By week's end, Italians were driven
from virtually all sections of Greece.
Aided by the RAF, columns of
white-skirted Grecian warriors were
pushing toward Porta Eda, while
scores of Opera-loving young Italian
youths nourished the water-logged
Italian soil, mute symbols of the new
order in Europe.
- Karl Kessler

Not many weeks ago John L. Lewis
attempted' to enlist some of labor's
support for Wendell Willkie. He pro-
mised that if Roosevelt was reelected
he would resign his office as top man
in the Congress of Industrial Organi-
zations. Roosevelt again won the
Presidency, and again he won it by
scoring heavily in labor's traditional
strongholds-the large industrial cen-
ters, where the CIO is strongest. Most
of the CIO voted for FDR.
Lewis Steps Down
And thus bushy-browed former coal
miner John L. Lewis last week stepped
down from the helm of the CIO, and
fellow United Mine Workers chief-
tain Philip Murray took over. Tears
were in his eyes as Lewis reaffirmed
his decision to resign before the sixth
convention of the CIO, meeting in
Atlantic City. Far cry it was from
that day in 1935 when Lewis and
other industrial unionists were
bounced from the old AFL, only to
spawn a vigorous new trade union
movement that organized up and
down instead of across. Last week,
Lewis was no longer the official sa-
chem of the CIO, and it was a hushed
audience that heard him pass on the
gavel to Scotsman Phil Murray.
Union Speculations
Foremost in the thoughts of Ameri-
can workers at the beginning of the
week were the possibilities of labor
unity with William Green'ssAmerican
Federation of Labor which was meet-
ing at the same time in New Orleans.
Many thought that unity was pos-
sible with Lewis gone. His real pow-
er, however, did not leave, for what
he said this week was still regarded
as gospel by the CIO's membership,
and he was still strongly opposed to
the AFL, Green, Dubinsky, and the
rest. He virtually told Sidney Hill-
man, FDR's labor expert in the Na-
tional Defense program and head of
the Amalgamated Clothing Workers,
to go play ball with the AFL.
U.S. White
Paper...
Elections out of the way, Congress-
manfDiespagain was able to make
the front pages last week, publishing
an American "white paper," in which
were described the activities of Ger-
man's agents in this country.
Agents direct their activities not
only toward propaganda and military
espionage but toward penetration in-
to the economic structure of this
country and South American, repub-
lics, the report said. The Committee
intends to issue these "revelations"
from time to time.
Announced also last week was the
Committee's intention to send imme-
diately investigators into eight cities
to seize recgrds of all organizations
which are "pro-Nazi, pro-Commun-
ist and pro-Japanese."
- Alvin Sarasohn

Order Now!
-ft

Unobliging Hillman refused the
offer, said his union would stick it
out as a minority group in the CIO,
put his stamp of approval on Murray,
condemned Communism in the labor
movement, complimented Lewis with-
out sarcasm. Again an issue in the
convention, Communism was con-
demned in a convention resolution-
only way Murray would accept the
presidency.
In New Orleans it wasn't as inter-
esting. Routine business was taken
care of, a guarantee of labor's sup-

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