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October 01, 1940 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

yTUES8DAY, OCTOBER 1, 1940
Local Linguist
Will Continue
StudyGroups
Foreign Language Students
Will Be Aided In Work'
By Mrs. Ruth L. Wendt
By JANET HIATT
Begining her second year in the,
official capacity of language coun-
selor for the women's dormitories on
- campus, Mrs. Ruth Wendt, will again
use her wide experience in foreign
countries to assist language students
in the University.
Mrs. Wendt began her work here
last fall, when in her capacity as
asisstant social director in Mosher
Hall. She organized and developed
foreign language groups among the
language students in Mosher and
Jordan Halls. Because of her great
success with this venture, the priv-
liege of her services was opened sec-
ond semester last year to the resi-
dents of Stockwell Hall, Betsy Bar-
bour House, Helen Newberry Resi-
dence, University House, Alumnae
House and Adelia Cheever House,
as well as those of Mosher-Jordan
Halls. Thus a skilled and ambitious
woman virtually created herself a
new job.
Linguist Gives Lessons
From the beginning of her stay
here, Mrs. Wendt had in mind the
idea that she wanted to do something
With foreign languages on this cam-
pus. Previously she has given pri-
vate lessons in English and German
when she lived in South America;
in Spanish, in Germany; and in Ger-
=man and Spanish when she lived in
Cuba. Her work here, however, has
been her first experience with group
teaching.
It is notable that Mrs. Wendt's
family in Germany, where she spent
her youth, can be traced back to
1300. Her father was a professor of
foreign languages at Hamburg Uni-
versity where she later lectured for
many years. Her job there was to
gather material for students' theses.
Her private language lessons during
this time enabled her to travel about
France, Spain, Italy and the Balkan
countries during her five weeks va-
cation each year. Later, she lived
for two years in Italy, for two years
in China, and for 12 years in Argen-
tina.
Varied Interests Shown
On this campus, Mrs. Wendt has
found most foreign language stu-
dents to be interested, not only in
the language of foreign peoples, but
in the countries themselves and in
the habits and customs of the peo-
ple. Accordingly she has arranged
not only foreign language dinner ta-
bles in the residence halls in which
she works, but also is "at home" in
her room at Stockwell Hall one night
each week when she discusses a dif-
ferent foreign country each time for
all interested students.
During the summer session this
year, Mrs. Wendt acted as social as-
sistant in the Deutsches Haus.

THE MICHIGAN DAILYv

PAGE THUER--SECI oN FOUR

t

Marcia Connell, Doris Wechsler
Married; Ann Vicary Engaged

The engagement of Ann Vicary,
'40, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. C.
Vicary of Dearborn, to Robert Dean
Mercer, '43M, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harold Mercer of Detroit, was an-
nounced Aug. 17.
The announcement was made at a
luncheon. A centerpiece of pink as-
tors and rubrum lillies in a heart
shaped arrangement formed the table
decoration.
Miss Vicary, former Woman's Ed-
itor of The Daily, is a member of
Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, Phi
Kappa Phi honorary society, Wyvern
and Mortarboard. She was in the
chorus of the 1940 JGP and has par-
ticiated in many League activities.
Marcia Connell and Russell S.
Strickland, both of Detroit, were
married last Saturday in Saint Jos-
eph's Church in Detroit. The bride
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Richard F.'Connell and Mr. Strick-
land is the son of Mr. and Mrs. S.
A. Strickland.
Mr. and Mrs. Strickland were both
graduated from the University in
1939. Mrs. Strickland was affiliated
with Delta Bamma sorority and Mr.
Strickland was a member of Phi Kap-
pa Psi. Mrs. Strickland was also a
member of Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kap-
pa Phi, Mortarboard and Wyvern
honor societies. Prominent in campus
activities she was women's editor of
Gargoyle, and chairman of the ori-
entation committee of the League.
She also served on Freshman Pro-
ject, Sophomore Cabaret and JGP
committees. Vice-president of the
senior class, Mrs. Strickland was
chosen to be "Michigan Girl" at the
1939 New York World's Fair.
* * 4q-
Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus Wechsler of
Gary, Ind. announce the marriage
of their daughter, Doris Wechsler,
'41, to Harold Finkle, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Samuel Finkle of Washington,

Engagement announced

ANN VICARY

Ja., Sept. 22 at the home of the
bride's parents.
At the formal afternoon wedding,
the bride wore white satin with a
fingertip veil. After as honeymoon
trip through the East, the couple
will live in Houston, Pa.
Mrs. Finkle, a member of Alpha
Epsilon Phi, had a leading role in
last year's JGP. She was a partici-
pant in many League activities and
served as a member of the decora-
tions committee for Freshman Proj-
ect. She was a Freshman Orientation
adviser. A member of Play Produc-
tion, Mrs. Finkle also had the lead
in the 1939 Hillel play, "Hospital
Hill."
Mr. Finkle attended Pennsylvania
State College where he was affiliated
with Phi Epsilon Pi fraternity.

Actress Needs
No Assistance
While On Stage
Ruth Draper Has Ability
To Create Cast, Scene
In OriginalMonologues
By GRACE MILLER r
"The dame is daffy," is the way
one critic chose to pass off Ruth Dra-
per, the actress who needs the help
of no playwright, costumes, or stage
hands.
Daffy it may be, but most of us
call it genius or stronger. The critic
later ate not only his words, but the
newspaper they appeared in, and the
type metal the words were set up in
as well. For the art of Ruth Draper
is such that no play could give scope
to her ability.
Uses No Scenery
With the aid of a single chair, per-
haps, or a shawl against a dark back-
drop, Miss Draper creates a Dalma-
tian peasant in a busy New York
hospital, or a Southern girl at a
dance, or the morning in bed of a
fretful society woman.
Mis Draper inherits some of her
knack from a very clever mother,
but the frequent touches of sheer
brilliance are something that are hers
alone. Her dramas are terse stories
packed full of suspense, and essen-
tially the stories of living people.
First among the qualities that en-
ables her to put across her special
form of art is the ability to trans-
late that vague impression of people
that most of us get into a knife-clear
perception of what these people think
and how they feel, and then to get
all this down on paper without blur-
ring the outlines.
Creates Characters
Then with a smile and big saucer
eyes she becomes a 17-year-old
charmer; or with narrowed eyes and
a rasp in her voice she is a woman
who is utterly weary of life. With a
gesture or a lift of an eyebrow she"
peoples the stage with one or a dozen
persons, flesh and blood to the aud-
ience.
Our brittle language insists on the
term "monologues" for these skits,
obviously entirely inadequate; con-
notation - something distressingly
boring and unbearably dry.
Actually, more drama is packed in-
to one of her 10-minute skits than
most writers ever achieve in a life-
time. In fact, the only play she ever
appeared in was a failure.
In one evening's performance Miss
Draper runs through an alarming
variety of emotions. From the friv-
olous to the hectic, each one is recog-
nizable because it is true. And her
unseen, unheard supporting cast'
carry off their roles with rare ability.

I i. Mf4RILYH

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Do's And Don'ts Recommended
For The Newly-Arrived Coed

Orientation week, that time duri'ng
which all freshmen women are look-
ed upon as cute little coeds and every-
thing they do is accepted with a smile,
is over. Times have changed and now
the pampered little freshman is but
one in the throng of Michigan women.
An uncensored research among the
men and women on the campus show-
ed a number of frown-bringers,
which should be avoided as consi-
entiously as possible. It has been dis-
covered that it is nottnecessary to
chew gum, but that the institution
is accepted if it is not made repulsive.
Campus Smokers "Taboo'
Across - campus - walking - smok-
ers are listed among the "don'ts",
especially when the smokers are of
the fair sex. During the winter
months, bare legs as well as ski suits
and knee length socks, are disliked by
the men. The happy medium of
stockings with anklets and saddle
shoes or stockings and low-heeled
shoes are accepted even by the men.
However, high heels on campus are
discounraged by one and all, for the
women know how uncomfortable
they are and the stronger sex think
they are silly.
-Professors and students alike agree
that chronic borrowers, perpetual
class cutters, and class room gigglers
are unbearable. Not only does the
practice of these make one among
the number ofsfrowned-upons, but
they also are habit forming and con-
tribute nothing to the intellect.
Learning to remember to purchase
pencils and paper and to bring them
toi class, disciplining oneself into re-
membering to attend class (or into
remembering that there is an eight
o'clock class on Monday morning that
you haven't attended for three weeks),
and learning to control that nerve-

SPECIALIZING IN
JUNIORS--9 to 15
MISSES 12 to 20
POPU[LAR
PRICES
U TO $21.95

yI
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racking giggle are all a part of an
education.
venient and conspicuous placesOINN
Sidewalks are provided in conven-
ient and conspicuous places through-
out the campus and prove very prac-
tical, especially on rainy days. The
days of trail blazing are gone f or-
ever-at least on the Michiganecam-
pus.
Back to women's fashions again.
When it comes right down to it, most
of us are still in the youthful stage
of life and might as well admit it.
Earrings often add the finishing
touch to formal attire,but look ab-
solutely out of place with the usual
sweater and skirt or sports dress.
Oh, how we hate to admit it, but
men's ideas guide us in many of our
activities. They abhore last minute
date breakers (for that matter, any
kind of a date breaker) and women
who insist on taxis are avoided unless
the man is rolling in wealth, and
very few of them are. College men
try to act sophisticated, but when it
comes right dow(n to it, they are quite
touchy on various matters and it has
been advised, by those who have
learned through sad experience, that
it is best to steer clear of such sub-
jects.
Watching the development of lib-
rary romances is the favorite pastime
of manya student. Though interest
Library Romances Banned
in the case at hand is often high,' it
tears down after a period of time
and disgust takes its place. Avoid
Danny Cupid in the library and hold
hands on the way home instead.
The lecture for today is over, child-
ren. Let that annoying conscience
help guide you through the days to
come. Good luck and have a very
happy year.

Th e
529-531 E Liberty St Michigan Theatre Bldg.

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