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November 21, 1940 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-21

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140.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wolverine Gridmen Drill Intensively For Ohio State

Clash

Hockey Team
Should Better
Past Records
Coach- Eddie Lowrey Says
Players Have To Fight
For Starting Berths
By ART HILL
Take it from Eddie Lowrey, things
are going to be different with the
Wolverine hockey squad this year.
With the opening game a little more
than a week away, the team is work-
ing out nightly at the Coliseum and,
although the Michigan mentor re-
fuses to go too far out on a limb,
there's a note in his voice that can't
be misinterpreted when he talks
about the season's prospects.
"They're bigger and faster and
there are more of them," he points
out, "and what's more they're fight-
ing this year. They've got to if they
want regular jobs."
Reserves Stronger
One can't blame Eddie for being
a little more optimistic than usual.
For the first time in years, he has
four'good front lines on the ice every
night and what's more, it begins to
look like there may be some relief
for the overworked defense men dur-
ing the coming campaign. This is
practically an unheard of luxury on
Wolverine puck squads.
Captain Charley Ross and Bert
Stodden will once again team up at
the defense posts this season while
Hank Loud seems to have the inside
track on the goalie's job, vacat d
by last year's captain, the incompr-
able"Eldon (Spike) James.
In,the early drills, Lowrey has been
working Paul Goldsmith, Max Bah-.
rych and Bob Kemp on one front line
and Johnny Gillis, Roy Bradley and
Jimmy Lovett on a second forward
wall.
Sophs Show Promise
Kemp and Bahrych, both up from
last season's strong-freshmansquad,
are both experienced hockey players
with plenty of speed and they give
promise of sparking a rejuvenated
Michigan offense. Goldsmith, a vet-
eran, is a speedy skater and a fine
stick handler.
Johnny Gillis, who recently gave
up his job on the Varsity swimming
team to take a shot at hockey, is a
big boy with plenty of fight and a
stinging shot, and works smoothly at
the center spot on the second line
with Jimmy Lovett and Roy Bradley,
a sophomore, flanking him.
The tentative third line has Cliff
Iance, Johnny Corson and Fred Hed-
dle teaming up. All three are veterans
of last year's squad although Dance
was injured midway in the 1939-40
season and had to quit for the balance
of the year.

don irtYhafter's
II DAILY DOUBLE

d

ii

Terrible Tom's Letter Box .. .
We've got evidence for you today.
It seems that Tom Harmon's mailbox has been filled with all sorts of
literature this season. Fans all over the nation have sent him letters. To-
day we're printing through Terrible Tom's permission just a few of these.
But they prove a point. For obvious reasons, we are using only the initials
of the contributors.
Saturday, November 9, 194Q
Dear Tom,
This afternoon I saw one of the greatest performances of any team I
have ever seen. I said team, because, I thought that Minnesota was out-
played man to man by the best team seen in Minneapolis in a long time.
Outside of Bruce Smith's run, the local boys were never in there.
64,000 fans came out to see you and a great Michigan eleven and not one
went away disappointed. Besides being outweighed 15 pounds to the man
and the foul weather which presented itself, you didn't have to take a back
seat to anyone. Captain Evashevski's blocking and tackling, not to men-
tion the signal calling, was superb. Westfall, Frutig, Rogers, Ingalls and
Wistert were also marvelous..
I guess most fans ask for pictures, money, autographed footballs or
something to that effect, but all I'm asking is for you guys to go out and
trim the living daylights out of Northwestern and Ohio. Hope you play
here this winter in basketball and in the meantime, good luck to the
"Greatest team in the country"-MICHIGAN.
-T.M., Minneapolis.
November 14, 1940
Tom Harmon . . .
I suppose that you will receive dozens of letters from the 64,000 who
were at Memorial Stadium Saturday.
Some will call you a bum and some will praise you. If you happen
to read this letter I just wanted you to know that many people of Min-
nesota beside myself consider that the Great Harmon is still the Great
Harmon and that Michigan is still the Great Michigan.
-K.D., Jackson, Minnesota
Dear Tom Harmon.
I seen you play against Minnesota November 9, and although you never
made a touchdown you are still All-American in my book. I think you
would have made a few on a dry field, without you Michigan wouldn't be
where they are today, one of the best teams in the country. As a souvenir
I would appreciate it very much to have a piece of your number on your
sweater or your autograph.
Thanks a lot Pal,
' -S.G., Duluth, Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minn.
Dear Tom,
You may think that this is peculiar coming from a resident of Minne-
apolis and the son of a Minnesota professor, but I think you guys have got
the best team I have ever seen play at Memorial Stadium and I have seen
every game since 1930. The score should have been 19-7 with Michigan
beating Minnesota.
They say the Gophers have power, well, I'd like to know what they
call that Westfall. He's a human battering ram. He ripped our line
to shreds. It did me good to see those beefy Gopher linemen kiss the
turf when Bob came through.
And that Evashevski; boy *hat a blocker. On that punt you ran back
to the 40-yard line, he smacked Fitch so hard that I bet he'll always re-
member the "one man gang" by that name. He sure can call those plays.
Sincerely yours, B.B.
Now tell me, dear readers, who has the seventh best team in the nation?

Minor Ailments
Of Evashevski,
Harmon Better
Hammond Indicates Both
Will Oppose Buckeyes
At Columbus Saturday
Michigan's two ailing backfield
stars, Tom Harmon and Captain
Forest Evashevski, were back at Fer-
ry Field yesterday as Coach Fritz
Crisler sent his squad through anoth-
er scrimmage session. Harmon
stayed in the lineup long enough to
throw a few passes, but Evashevski
was not in uniform.
Dr. George Hammond, team phy-
sician, said that Evashevski was still
bothered slightly by a digestive dis-
turbance, and was "feeling a little
under the weather." His chances of
seeing service against Ohio State Sat-
urday were good, but some improve-
ment in his condition will be neces-
sary.
Harmon reported that he was still
bothered by a bad cold, but his leg
injury was nothing that will hamper
his playing. He said he would defin-
itely be ready Saturday.
Two others were added to the sick
list yesterday. Regular end Joe Ro-
gers was also sent into the locker
room for an early shower when he
complained of a cold. Reserve end
Rudy Smeja became the second prac-
tice casualty in two days, when he
hurt his knee while making a tackle.
His injury will put him on the side-
lines for the rest of the season.
Dave Nelson, who strained his foot
in Tuesday's scrimmage, was still
undergoing treatment, and it was not
known whether or not he would be
ready for the Buckeyes.

By HAL WILSON
The rising crescendo of All-America
drum-beating presages the approach
of another torrid siege of gridiron
selections, and as the 1940 campaign
approaches its climax, the almost hys-
terical booming of favorite gridmen
for honorary positions has reached
blow-torch heat.
Amid all the clamor and ballyhoo,
however, one fact stands out. This'
year's crop of backfield candidates is
definitely above the usual standard-
so far superior, in fact, that it would
be difficult to name any season in
football history during which so many
brilliant stars rose on the gridiron
horizon at the same time.
Taking them by sections, here's a
roundup of those backs whose all
around abilities and performances
have boosted them near the pinnacle
of the All-America select list:
East: Despite Frank Reagan's rath-
er lustreless showing against Michi-
gan, the triple-threat Quaker ace with
his 81 point scoring total rates as one
of the nation's best.
Cornell can thank two of its back-
field men for much of the grid glory
which has skyrocketed it to a rating
as the country's number one team.
Hal McCullough, running and hurl-
ing sensation, and husky Walt Matus-
zczak, the Evashevski of the East,
carry plenty of gridiron dynamite.
Other standouts in the East include
Fordham's, Len Eshmont and Jim
Blumenstock, Yale's Hovey Seymour,
George Kracum, Pitt's power-back,
and Princeton's Dave Allerdice.
South: Leading this section are
North Carolina's Slinging "Sweet"
Lalanne, Alabama's swivel-hipped
Jimnly Nelson, "Jarring" John Polan-
ski, 205 pounds of scoring power from

Many All-America Backfield Hopes
Emerge As Grid Season Nears End

Wake Forest, Jupe Hovious and Merle
Hapes of Mississippi, and Bob Foxx
and Johnny Butler of undefeated
Tennessee.
Middle West: Certain to be a una-
nimous All-America choice for the
second consecutive year, Michigan's
Tommy Harmon is not only the best
back in this section, but also in the
entire nation. Another speedster,
George Franck, is burning up the turf
for Minnesota's juggernaut, while
Northwestern's Bill DeCorrevont is
showing the gridiron finesse expected
of him last year.
Hare driving Milt Piepul is being
acclaimed as one of the best fullbacks
in Notre Dame history, while Wolver-
ines' Bullet Bob Westfall and Capt.
Forest Evashevski are very instru-
mental factors in Michigan's impres-
sive record.
Pressing close oennu unese aces are
Ohio State's Don Scott, Northwest-
ern's Don Clawson, Hurling Hal
Hursh of Indiana, Bruce Smith of
Minnesota, Paul Christman of Mis-
INTRAMURAL NOTICE
The Sports Building will be on
its Sunday schedule today, with
the building open to students
from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Earl Riskey, Asst. Director
of Intramural Sports

souri. and Nebraska's Herman Rohrig.
Southwest: Heading the list of tal-
ent in this section's rugged brand of
football is last year's All-America
John Kimbrough, again leading his
crew to an undefeated season, South-
ern Methodist's Preston Johnson,
shifty Jack Crain of Texas, and the
Aggies' Jim Thomason.
Far West: Out on the Pacific Coast
husky Norm Standlee is a leading
factor in Stanford's grid renaissance,
while Dean McAdams of Washington,
Jim Kisselburgh of Oregon State,
U.C.L.A.'s Jackie Robinson, St. Mary's
Ed Heffernan and Santa Clara's Jim
Johnson are also outstanding.
T HE SH OR TEST DISTANCE
BETWE EN TWO POINTS IS
I eleqrap
CHARGES FOR TELEGRAMS
'PHONED IN APPEAR ON YOUR
TELEPHONE BILL.

Mann's Carnivals Rival Rose's

I

Billy Rose may be the dean of
Aquacades around New York town
and San Francisco, but genial, like-
able Matt Mann is the master show-
man around these parts.
His Swim Galas have been one of
the feature attractions during swim-
ming seasons for six years now, and
this year is no exception.
On the night of Friday, Nov. 29,
Matt .will open the doors on the sixth
annual Gala-bigger and better than
ever before. That, of course, has
been written many, many times. But

Matt promises a super evening of
entertainment.
And that's exactly what it will be-
an evening of entertainment. There
will be few races to, watch. Matt is
concentrating on giving the, swim-
ming public a show-a t'water spec-
tacle.
With this as the theme, the master
showman has planned a master show
of spills, thrills and chills. Friday,
Nov. 29, is the date of Matt Mann's
sixth annual Swim Gala-a nata-
torial extravaganza.

4AA

PERSONAL GREETING
CH RISTMAS CARDS
WITH NAME
Box of Fifty Cards
$1.00 and up
THE MAYER-SCHAIRER CO.
STATIONERS, PRINTERS, BINDERS
Phone 4515 OFFICE OUTFITTERS 112 S. Main St.

Intramural
Angles
By Gene Gribbroek
Another major evenit was added to
the Intramural Department's sche-
dule with the, announcement . that
the National Volleyball Champion-
ships will take place in the Sports
Building gymnasium next May 7, 8
and 9.
Teams from 45 cities will travel to
Ann Arbor for the tourney, including
the Los Angeles Athletic Club, Na-
tional A.A.U. champs, and the Hous-
ton, Texas, Y.M.C.A. outfit, defend-
ing its National "Y" title.
Freshman Fred Wellington took
the all-campus tennis champion-
ship by defeating Louis Telbizoff
in the finals Saturday, 4-6, 6-4,
6-4. Wellington was number two
man on the Ann Arbor Hight squad
last season, and teamed with Roger
Lewis to take the State Class A
High School doubles title.

Jan qivinq ┬žinner
Served from, 12:15 to 2 p.m.
MENU
KALAMAZOO CELERY HEARTS STUFFED OLIVES PICKLED TIDBITS
FLORIDA GOLD GRAPEFRUIT JUICE CHILLED TOMATO JUICE
or CREAM OF ASPARAGUS SOUP
ROAST NATIVE TURKEY WITH BLACK WALNUT DRESSING
OCEAN SPRAY CRANBERRY SAUCE GIBLET GRAVY
CANDIED YAMS or WHIPPED IN CREAM POTATOES
MASHED HUBBARD SQUASH or CREAMED CAULIFLOWER
FRUIT SALAD WOLVERINE or TOMATO ICEBERG SALAD
WARM PARKERHOUSE ROLLS or ASSORTED BREADS AND BUTTER
HOT MINCE PIE WITH CHEESE
or FRESH PUMPKIN PIE WITH WHIPPED CREAM
COFFEE TEA MILK
AFTER-DINNER MINTS
Only 75c
The MICHIGAN WOLVERINE
209 SOUTH STATE PHONE 2-1124
Reservations accepted

Er

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COLD
WEATHER
WEAR
WOOL HOSIERY
5OC TO $1.85
GLOVES
SWEATERS
SWEDE JACKETS
CORDUROY COATS
TOP-COATS

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Trigon's water polo team, shooting
for its fourth straight Interfrater-
nity title, opened the season Monday
afternoon with a 3-2 overtime win
over Sigma Chi. The winning count-
er was scored in the last seconds of
the one-minute overtime period.
This is the third year in a row
that Sigma Chi has been paired with
the champions in the opening game,
and each year has been eliminated
by a one-point margin.
The Department has had to bow
to the sudden influx of an unusu-
ally large number of badminton
players on campus this fall. Three
courts will be reserved for the
sport each afternoon from 4:00 to
6:04.

AND, OVERCOATS

Richman Bros.
CE OTHES

I

IVY. aI l t

I IN

II

ifl

11

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