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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 08, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PA". SX THE MICHIGAN DAILY Fi.

[IDAY NOVEMBER 8 1946

New Technic
To Be Issue
Next Tiesd
Utilities Industry Ar
Will Be Featured

They Started 'Coke-Dating' Young

Electron Microscope Will Aid
University Scientific Research1

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lay,
rtiehl
I In

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

- 11

---1

.a__________ _ ..._____ ______________ .___

EngineeringMagazine
The second issue of the Michigan
Technic, official publication of the
Engineering College, will go on sale
Tuesday, George Weesner, '41E, ed-
itor, announced yesterday.
Featured in the issue is an article
entitled "From Arc Lights On" by
Prof. Benjamin Baily of the electrical
engineering department, which con-
cerns the early development of the
utilities industry in America. The
story is written as an autobiography
andt-t'ells the part played by Professor
Bailey in solving several lighting
problems.
The other articles were all written
by members of the Technic staff.
One of them, "Tires and War," by
Charles R. Tieman, '411, deals with
the possibilities of developing a syn-
thetic rubber if a blockade 'should
cut off the nation's present supply
and another, "Lubrication: Science,"
by Arthur W. C. Dobson, '42E, dis-
cussesthe navy's oil investigations.
"Intercollegiate Flying," the third
of these articles, is a history of the
National Intercollegiate Flying Club,
written by Leslie, J. Trigg, '41E, and
Edward T. Martin, '41E.
Also included are short biographies
of Jack Harwood, '41E, last year's
J-Hop chairman, Reuben Kelto, '41E,
tackle on the football team, and
Prof. D. K.,Kazarinoff of the mathe-
matics department in the section
called "Technic Presents."
Mentor Williams
Will lBe Speaker
A t Hillel Meeting
Prof. Mentor L. Williams of the
Ehglish department will be the guest
speaker of the Hillel Fireside Dis-
cussion at 8:15 p.m. today in the
Hillel Foundation.
Professor "Williams, who two years
ago was voted the most popular
teacher on campus, plans to talk on
the subject, "The Conflict of Two
Worlds." The discussion will ap-
proach present world conditions from
the viewpoint of two types of eco-
nomic societies conflicting.
The general subject of the Fire-
side Discussions is "This Changing
World," and in his analysis Professor
Williams will view this transition as
a situation that has been coming to

- Daily Photo by Will Sapp
Dorothy Dice and freckled Dick Hager, left, and Margot Eschel-
bacher and John Hathaway, right, were photographed coke dating in
true collegiate style between rehearsals for the current Theatre Arts
production opening today. They are among the 15 Ann Arbor children
who will appear with University students presenting three performances
or the "screwball-fairytale-comedy" at 3:45 p.m. today, and 1:30 and
3:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Murder, Robbery, Criminals
Appear In Theatre Group Play

By A. P. BLAUSTEIN
Intensified research in the former-
ly sub-microscopic world is the pres-
ent goal of several science depart-
ments for whom the University hasi
just purchased an electron micro-
scope, capable of magnifying an ob-i
ject 30,000 times.
The new microscope, which will be
delivered to Ann Arbor sometime in
February, was bought with a Rack-
ham Fund grant for $9,500 at the
request of the Hygienic Laboratories'
and the depa' tments of physics.
chemistry, chemical engineering and
electrical engineering according to
an announcement made yesterday by
Dean Clarence S. Yoakum of the
Graduate School.
Six and one-half feet high, the new
scope is built into a pillar-like unit
containing its own power supply and
set back on a desk with knobs and
dials. Plans have been made to
house it in the East Physics Building
under the supervision of Prof. O. S.
Duffendack of the physics depart-
ment.
Three departments are contem-
plating work with the electron micro-
scope as soon as it is installed. The
Hygienic Laboratories staff, headed
by Prof. Malcolm H. Soule of the
bacteriology department, intends to
make a number of bacterial studies
while an examination of the struc-
ture of fibres, plastics and fine col-
loidal particles will be carried"onin
the chemical engineerng department
under Prof. A. H. White, chairman.
The physics department will de-
vote its time to studying the struc-
ture of organic materials particularly
attempting to see large molecules
and their structures. They are also
very much interested in learning
more, by using the microscope, of
problems in electron scattering.
Functioning with a vacuum inside,
all specimens will have to be inserted
into the microscope through an air
lock after being mounted on a very
thin film of collodion. Images may
be seen, on a fluorescent screen or
photographed on a photographic
plate.
Although operated essentially on
the same principle as an ordinary
optic microscope, the electron 'scope
is vastly different in more ways than
just size. Instead of using light
waves it utilizes beams of electrons
and instead of glass lenses, magnetic
lenses.
In addition, as the electron rays

are accelerated by a volreitage'of 'up
to 60,00(0 volts, they have an equiva-
lent wave length of one-half of 100,-
000,000th of a centimeter which is
from four to eight thousand times
smaller than the wave length of light
used in an ordinary microscope.
The final result of this is that two
points become visable in the object
that are only 10,000,000ths of a cen-
timeter apart and magnification be-
'.omes justifiable up to 30,000 diam-
eters.
TileyDirects
Proverb Work
On Dictionary,
Among the most mysteriously la -
beled doors in University buildings~
is that of Room 2209 Angell Hall,
the "Proverb Editorial Office."
It is in this room, lined with work
tables and filing cases, that a staff
:)f nearly 20 workers, including many
NYA and WPA helpers, is editing
the "Dictionary of the Proverbs in
English 1500-1700)", under the di-
rection of Pr'of. Morris P. Tilley of
the English department.
Mote than a mere dictionary, this
volume of approximately 800 pages
will contain short histories showing
derivations and variations of nearly
10,000 proverbs from literary works
or collections of the 16th and 17th
centuries.
Dealing with voluminous material,
Professor Tilley is working with ex-
perience gained during 20 years of
work as a student and collector of
proverbs. He has delved into poetry
and prose drama and the novel, in
his search for information about the
sayings that were in fashion two or
three centuries ago.
In attempting to classify the prov-
erbs alphabetically, Professor Tilley
has listed them according to "catch
words." the first noun-or verb if
there is no noun-appearing in the
quotation. These catch words are
arranged in alphabetical order, each
proverb being given one paragraph.
First entry in each proverb's para-
graph is the earliest 16th or 11th
century reference, followed by later
variations on the original context.
It has been necessary to conform to
space limitations by eliminating less
important variations, Professor Til-
ley said yesterday.

IAvertisingY
Rates
Cash Rates
12e per reading line for one or
two insert ions.
10(' per reading line for three
(A' more insertions
:- pecial Rate)
$1.50 for six insertions
of three lines.
Five average words to a reading
line. Minimum of three lines
per insertion.
Contract Rates On Request
Our Want-Advisor will be
delighted to assist you in com-
posing your ad. Dial 23-24-1
or stop at the Michigan Daily
Business Office, 420 Maynard
Street.

FOR RENT
PLEASANT, well located rooms-
$2.50 and $3.00. 904 S. State St.
Phone 4685. 101
SOUTHEAST SECTION. Six-room
suburban bungalow on hilltop.
Large living room. Fireplace, sun-
room. Beautiful views. Attractive
yard. $45. Oril Ferguson. 928 For-
est. Phone 2-2839. 97
CAMPUS knear Law Quadrangle).
Nicely furnished 2-room apart-
ment. Private bath, electric re-
frigeration. Murphy bed, inner
spring mattress. $40. Oril Fergu-
son, 928 Forest. Phone 2-2839. 98
LOST and FOUND
LOST - Notebook and chemistry
book. Under Engineer Arch. Call
24401 or U. Bus. Office. Reward.
104
MISCELLANEOUS -20

HELP WANTED

Murders, stolen bank funds and
a desperate criminal are combined
to make "The Bat," forthcoming
Play Production offering, an exciting
mystery, with enough novel twists to
lift it out of the ranks of the run-of-
the-mill detective yarns.
In this manner Prof. William P.
Halstead, director, described the play
by Mary Roberts Rinehart and Avery
Hopwood that will be shown in the
Lyd1ia Mendelssohn Theatre Wednes-
day through Saturday next week.
The story begins when an elderly
ROTC Rifle Team
Foresees Big Year
The appearance of 75 tryouts to
bolster the University ROTC rifle
team has brought hopes for a repeti-
tion of last year's supcessful match
season, the military science depart-
ment announced yesterday.
Hoping to defend its record of
only five losses in 80 matches, the
rifle team, retaining 11 regular mem-
3ers from last year, has arranged to
inter Big Ten competition for the
second consecutive year. Harry Alt-
man, '43E, manager of, the team,
has already contracted telegraphic

woman rents a summer house, the
home of a bank president who had
died the week before. The bank
failed and an investigation showed
that a million dollars had been em-
bezzled. Suspicion falls on a teller
of the bank and it is surmised that
the funds are hidden in the house.
Among the people who come to
look for the money is a famous crim-
inal nicknamed "The Bat" because
his crimes are done at night and be-
cause of a sketch of that animal
that he leaves at the scene of his
activities.
The story employs few trick props,
which has simplified the sets prob-
lem, but the group was forced to have
a rubber telephone made, to avoid
accident when one of the charac-
ters is hit over the head with a phone.
The mystery was Hopwood's most
popular play, having had the fourth
most successful run in New York
:Theatrical history. It played 867
times on Broadway.

WANTED-Boy to work for room.
514 Thompson, 102
FOR SALE
PERSONAL STATIONERY - 100
sheets, 100 envelopes, printed with
your name and address-$1.00.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard St. 12c
LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
Price List
(All articles washed and ironed)
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries
Shirts.....................14
Undershirts ................ .04
Shorts ..................... .04
Pajama Suits ................10
Socks, pair ................. .03
Handkerchiefs ............. .02
Bath Towels .............. .03
All, Work Guaranteed
Also special prices oni Coeds'
laundries. All bundles done sep-
ar:ttely. No markings. Silks,
woo!" are our specialty.

MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 So.
State. 19c
USED CLOTHING-bought and sold.
Claude H. Brown, 512 S. Mairi St.
Phone 2-2756. 17c
FRATERNITY and SORORITY pro-
grams and mailings; mimeograph-
ing. Edwards Letter Shop. 711 -N.
University. Phone 2-2846. 6c
SEWING-Alterations on coats and
dresses. Relining and household
mending. Phone 2-2678. Opposite
Stockwell Hall. 87
TYPING----18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c
TYPING-Neatly and accurately
done. 308-10 S. State. Phone 7417.
95
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN- Experienced legal
typists also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. Sc

a head for a period of 75 to 100 years. matches with 30 university teams.

___ ._.. ..... __.. _._ .____..y.__.._.__._ . ___---.___ .. __ _.. _ _._ ___._. . _ __._._ ___ _ _.___

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PRESENTING

THE NOVEMBER LIST
of
NEW CD0 L U MB

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ALBUM

SETS

PETROUCIKA SUiTE (Stravinsky)
Stravinsky and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra . $2.50
CONTRASTS FOR VIOLIN, CLARINET and PIANO (Bartok)
Szigeti, Benny Goodman, Bela Bartok . . . . . 62.50
SCHUBERT'S YMPHONY No. 2
Barlow and Columbia Broadcasting Symphony . $3.50
IOI.ANTHE (Gilbert and Sullivan)
Columbia Light Opera Company.. . . . . . $5.00

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SONATINE and MENUET
Robert Casadesus -- pianist

$2.00

SINGLE RECORDS

DEBUSSY - MOUVEMENT, CIIOCHES
Gieseking - pianist . . . . . . . . . . . $
MOZART - DON G1O9ANNI OVERTURE
Beecham and London Philharmonic. Orchestra . . . $
ELGAR - PoMip and CIRCUMSTANCE
Wood and London Philharmonic Orchestra . . . , $
SELECT YOUR FAVORITES FROM OUR
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