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November 07, 1940 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY NOVEMBER i, 19,10

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY NOVEMBER 7, 1940
II (*spitalF pean Coiiditioiis Influenced Re4'dster Early,

First Voters'
To.Be Honored
Here Sunday
University 'Twenty Oners'
And Naturalized Citizens
Are Requested To Attend
Formal recognition of newly ac-
quired American citizenship will be
held in ceremonies honoring "first
voters" and recently naturalized cit-
izens at 3 p.m. Sunday in the Ann
Arbor High School, under the aus
pices of the Washtenaw County Cit-
izenship Committee.
The program will climax a three-
month series of forums for new vot-
ers, sponsored by the Committee on
a completely non-partisan basis for
the purpose of heightening interest
in the electoral campaign and exer-
cise of the right to vote.
All citizens who have recently ob-
served their 21st birthdays or com-
pleted naturalization are urged to
attend this meeting, with a special
invitation issued to 'University stu-
dents who voted Tuesday for the
first time. "Twenty-oners," the young
voters, will take part in the program,
giving short speeches in reply to
their welcome to the ranks of Ameri-
cdn citizens in a presentation address
by State Supreme Justice George
Bushnell.
Detroit Minister To Speak
Featured speaker will be the Rev.
M. S. Rice of Detroit's Metroolitan
Episcopal Church, and the entire
meeting will be under the leadership
of Ernest H. Chapelle, Superintendent
of Ypsilanti Schools. Prof. F. N.
Menefee of the Engineering Mechan-
ics Department will present the newly
naturalized citizens.
A citizenship day bill, sponsored by
the National Educational Association,
is now being considered by Congress,
aiming at national meetings like that
being planned by the County Com-
mittee for Sunday.
Students on the campus who have
just cast their first vote are invited
program. Further information may be
obtained in the Office of the Reg-
istrar.,

ELECTION RESULTS

Stae Votig
PRESIDENT
Roosevelt (D)
W illkie (R) ...........
U.S. SENATOR
Fit/,g,rald (D)
Vandenberg (R) ..... .

955,109
918,120
774,645
872,387

County Voting
STATE REPRESENTATIVE
Warner (R)........... . 21,123
Hendley (D) . ............11,162
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
Meader (R) .............22,605
Keusch (D)..............9,973
COUNTY CLERK
Smith (R) .............22,160
Eby (D) ................ 10,435
COUNTY TREASURER
Fleming% (R)............ 19,898
Forshee (D) ....... . ....12,706
DRAIN COMMISSIONER
Tuomy (R).............21,057
Masten (D).............11,314

GOVERNOR
Van Wagoner (D).,......891,473
Dickinson (R) .. . ... 797,202
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR
F. Murphy (D) .........815,472
Keyes (R)815,553
SECRETARY OF STATE
Leo V. Card (D) .......797,866
Kelly (R).969,177
ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Starr (D).............875,945
Ru hton (R) ...........868,945
STATE TREASURER
FYry (D) ........... ...879,308
Flynn (R).............867,908
AUDITOR-GENERAL
Dotsch (D)820,195
Brown (R)............919,151
SUPREME COURT JUSTICE
Elliot (D) ............ 411,549
Boyles (R) ............ 550,701
CONGRESS 2nd DISTRICT
Michener (R)...........81,544
Burr (D)................44,032
STATE SENATOR, 12th DISTRICT
McCallum (R)...........53,500
Johnson (D) ............ 38,926

CORONERS (Two)
Ganzhorn (R) ..........
Harris (R) ........... .
Schumacher (D) ........

21,726
21,952
12,008

PROBATE JUDGE
Christman .............. 11,764
Pray..................17,374
CIRCUIT COURT COMMISSIONER
Lawrence .............. 10,978
Brown.................18,249
Hooper................18,195
COUNTY VOTE ON PROPOSALS
Proposal No. 1 (School Bonds)
Yes .... 10,872 No .... 16,015
Proposal No. 2 (Civil Service)
Yes .... 15,433 No .... 11,835
Proposal No. 3 (Buses)
Yes .... 13,137 No .... 13,783
Proposal No. 4 (Dental Law)
Yes .... 13,798 No .... 8,369
Proposal No. 5 (Huron Parkway)
Yes .... 19,186 No . ... 10,978

University Hospita
ffas Ti'tU( Stud (ent s
Under Observation
The University Hospital reported
Yesterday that two University stu-
dents were patients in their charge.
George Ceithaml, '43, a member of
the football team, received a head in-
jury in football practice on Tuesday
nd was brought to the hospital for
observation. He was released late
Yesterday.
Wallace Ratliff, '41, was operated
on Monday for appendicitis. His doc-
tors report he is doing well, and will
be kept at their service for another
week. Jane Cayia, '43, entered the
hospital Monday with an appendicitis
attack, and is being kept under ob-
servation,
Fulle- Made Head
Of Sociology Club
Prof. Richard C. Fuller of the soci-
ology department was elected presi-
dent of the Michigan State Sociolog-
ical Society at the annual meeting of
the Society Saturday at Hillsdale
College. This organization draws its
membership from the various sociol-
ogy departments of the colleges and
universities in the State of Michigan.
A round-table discussion presided
over by Dean Clarence S. Yoakum
centered ardund opportunities for
criminological research in Michigan.
Professors Arthur E. Wood, Lowell J.
Carr and Mr. Clark Tibbitts, all of
the sociology department, were par-
ticipants in the round-table.
SW H E N M IN UT E S
M E AN MO0N EY-
T E LE GR APH VI A
Telegqraph
CHARGES FOR TELEGRAMS 'PHONED IN
APPEAR ON YOUR TELEPHONE BILL.

By CHESTER BRADLEY
"Franklin Roosevelt's reelection as
President of the United States will
no doubt mean the continuation of
social and economic reforms and a
new concentration on hemispheric
unity."
Such is the opinion of Prof. Everett
S. Brown of the political science de-
partment on the probable effects of
President Roosevelt's smashing vic-
tory in Tuesday's election.
"The President's reelection also de-
cisively ended the anti-third-term
'tradition, but it cannot be definitely
established whether or not this was
due to the critical foreign situation,"
he said.
"The whole election was undoubt-
edly influenced by European condi-
tions. This observation is supported
by the fact that the Republican gains
of 1938 were not repeated this year,
that the Republican vote in Maine
counties near the Canadian border
was less than in 1936 and also in the
border counties in upstate New
York."
Further evidence of the importance
of the foreign situation in the cam-
paign was apparent in the President's
increased popularity in the various
polls whenever a startling foreign
development arose, Professor Brown
said.
Henry Wallace's campaign speech-
es with their emphasis on the prob-
lem of foreign affairs were cited by
Professor Brown as additional proof
Flowers
Distinction
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giving one of our careful selec-
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Chelsea
FLOWER SHOP
203 E. Liberty Phone 2-2973

of the primary significance of the
Second World War in the presiden-
tial election.
Another salient feature of the elec-
tion was the pronounced evidence of
split-balloting and individual voting,
Professor Brawn pointed out. "Wit-
ness the election of Republican Rep-
resentative Ham Fish in Democratic
New York, the victory of U.S. Sen-
ator Hiram Johnson in Democratic
California, and the election of Re-
publican Governor Bricker in Demo-
cratic Ohio."
A characteristic of the election
which was especially "gratifying" to
Professor Brown was the large per-
centage of registered persons who
cast their vote, as for example in
New York City 95 per cent of thoseI
registered voted.
"And finally the 1940 election is
noteworthy because it followed free
and democratic procedures and was
uncontrolled in sharp contrast to the
elections in totalitarian nations,"
Professor Brown concluded.

Late Registration Hampers
AppointmentsBureau
Dr. T. Luther Purdom, Director of
the University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Informa-
tion, wishes to impress upon all sen-
iors and giraduate students the ur -
gency of registering at the bureau
before the end of this week
Not only will lAte registrants be
subject to the late registration fee
of one dollar. but the work of classi-
fication will be hampered and the
efficiency of the service to the stu-
dents themselves will be impaired.
Besides placing graduates the bu-
reau serves as an agency for assem-
bling and filing information of value
to students in selecting a vocation
and determining the job for which
they are best fitted.
Read The Dx1dy Classifieds!

European Conditions Influenced1Register Early
Election, Prof. Brown Declares Purdom Urges

Your Guide to,
GOOD READING
The Family . Fedorova $2.50 A I Remember Him
For Whom The Bells Toll. . . Zinsser 2.75
The Best Plays of 1939-40
Hemingway 2.75 . . . . Mantle 3.00
Foundation Stone Warren 3.00 New England: Indian
Summer . . Brooks 3.75
Mrs. Miniver . Struther 2.00 A Treasury of the World's
Great Letters Schuster 3.75
You Can't Go Home Again How Green Was My Valley
. ...Wolfe 3.00 ... Llewellyn 2.75
BUY OR RENT THESE FINE BOOKS
AT
FO0 LLETT'S

_ . . . i

Students Will Gii
Halstead revealed, but added an-
other section to the story. The play
was later novelized.
An outstanding feature of this
mystery, Professor Halstead said, is
that it is a perfect detective novel.
"As far as I can tell," he declared,
"there is no flaw in the motivations,

ve Hopwood Play,
and an explanation is given for every
part of the action."
The play depends on characteriza-
tions and logical motivations for its
suspense. Halstead revealed, and only
one of the tricks familiar in many
detective stories is present. That is
a hidden room in the h6use.

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