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October 01, 1940 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1940

PAGE FOUR-SECTION TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

?AAE FOUR-SECTION TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hudson, Rowell
Given Acclaim
As Yearlings
A survey of the leading rookies
during the 1940 Major League base-
ball season merely serves to prove
what baseball men have long known,
that trying to pick the outstanding
first year men in advance is like try-
ing to say whether Roosevblt will run
for a fifth term.
Take for example the cases of a
couple of lads named Carvel Rowell
and Sid Hudson. Not very many peo-
ple had ever heard of these lads when
the recently' closed baseball season
started last spring. Rowell, young
Boston Bees second baseman, batted
.279 for Hartford last season and
then surprised by being in the thick
of the'fight -for the National League
batting title throughout most of the:
1940 campaign.
Hudson's record is perhaps even
more sensational. He pitched for
Sanford in the Class D Florida State
League during the 1939 season. Al-
though he turned in a mark of 24
victories and 4 defeats, the Senators
didn't count too heavily on him this
year because the jump from Class D
to the Majors was considered too
great. However, Sid didn't let the
big crowds and heavy hitters scare
him. He has done so well that many
experts pick him as the best rookie
of the year.

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Injuries Wreak Havoc
With Harvard Eleven

Harvard's Crimson team, which the
University of Michigan will meet Oct.
19 at Cambridge, is getting a terrific
dose of the old bugaboo, injury.
Sophomore Johnny Page, the best
looking center on the team, was put
out of action for the season with a
back injury sustained in a scrimmage
last week. More of the same hard
luck will change what appears to be
a crackerjack team into the cracked-
up class.
Michigan Gridders
Win All-American
Football Laurels
When halfback Tom Harmon was
named to virtually all of the nation's
All-American grid teams last year, it
marked the twelfth time since 1934
that a Wolverine performer has
gained such an honor.
After Edliff "Butch" Slaughter was
chosen in 1924 as All-American guard,
national recognition for Maize and
Blue stars spurted and by 1928, six
All-American labels had been at-
tached to Wolverines. Stellar end
Benny Oosterbaan, present Michigan
cage coach, attained this highest
honor three times during his Varsity
career. Tackle Otto Pommerenning
and sensational pass tosser Benny
Friedman were the other Michigan
choices by 1928.
From 1929 to 1933, centers May-
nard "Doc" Morrison and Chuck Ber-
nard, triple-threat Harry Newman,
and tackle Whitey Wistert attained
All-American laurels. Then, with the
descent of the Wolverines into the
morass of gridiron mediocrity, came
a similar decline of Maize and Blue
candidates for top national honors.
Ralph Heikkinen, famed "watch-
charm guard," broke the ice in 1938.
Martineau Won Awards
Earl Martineau, Michigan back-
field coach, had a briiliqnt World
War record in the Marine Corps-he
won the Croix de Guerre and Distin-
guished Service Cross for Gallantry
in France-before he entered the
University of Minnesota in 1920.

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1

Taring creations of the 1940 style
ws are running rampant through-
the nation. Now that French wo-
n have been relegated to the wash
, New York and Hollywood are
ding the world in dress innova-
ns. Of course, we expected them
appear in Ann Arbor-and they're
e.

But it's not as they are presented
by our "fair women" that we're talk-
ing about. Our mighty representa-
tives of might and brawn on the
gridiron . . . well just wait until you
see them.
Those drab colored pants of last
year have been abandoned in the
light of this style wave. And what a

"light." They're a brilliant yellow
now . . . and knitted at that. This
material is supposed to eliminate
binding and, of all things, assures a
form fit.
And the shirts-you can't call them
jerseys any more. Michigan football
players won't be rolling sleeves up
very far this year unless they try one

__

...as Mother and Dad

knew

as

try Goldman's economical Standard Cleaning Service

Michigan Football Uniforms Are DrasticallyChanged For 1940 Season-Yellow, Lightweight Pants To Be Worn

of those "vest off without removing4
the coat" jobs. In fact our informant
reports that they're practically doing
away with sleeves. Definitely a dar-
ing trend, we think. And, of course,
these new shirts are resplendent in
color-at least until the first few
plays.
We could mention the flashy socks,

plain DRESSES
SUITS .. .COATS

helmets, etc., but if you can withhold stowed 765 pounds of paraphenalia
your curiosity until next Saturday aboard the United Airline planes
afternoon, you can see "fashion cre- that winged the team of 35 to the
ations of the gridiron" for yourself, i coast. The usual shoes and stock-
The Wolverine headgears will be ings will be worn by the team this
the customary blue color with a yel- year.
low trim on the prominent parts.
With the new lightweight equipment,
Henry Hatch, equipment manager,I Read The Daily Classif ied
---~-~----~--~-~

STANDARD DRYCLEANING is not to
be confused wth our first grade Certi-
fied Miraclean Service (including Re-
texturing and Insured Moth-proofing)
which is a superior service for your better
garments.

c

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jAC~yf
oTSP0 RA

s P W
P
for all around campus wear...a
Bontamac jacket. Made of a proc-
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shower-proof as material mary
times its weight.
Illustrated, Country Squire...one
of the many available styles at
your favorite shop...$5,00.

INND-
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Free Delivery Service
Brother s

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