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November 02, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r~AGE THREE

Minnesota-Northwestern

Game

Tops

National

Grid

Card

.n wirtehafter's
DAIL Y
DOUBLE
Brains (?) vs. Brawn . .
The Daily Double has picked up two
extra passengers on today's game-v
guessing contest.
I have now three low-breeds to con-r
tend with, "Martin" Evashevski, "Bar-
ton" Harmon, and last, and of course
least, "Fish" Chandler. t
Just for the fun of it I watched)
these three unworthy opponentsi
carefully yesterday just to see Oaowx
the so-called "experts" do theirr
picking.
After passing out lists of the gamesj
that we were to tackle, I diligently
took notes on the methods that they1
employed to get their results. I amt
happy to say that all three are im-
practical, stupid, silly, childish, im-
becillic, in fact, bad.-
.Evashevski, for example, used thel
Grantland Rice system. He took sev-
eral glances at his list, confidently
circled a few sure ones, and then
went to work on his system.t
"Northwestern plays Minnesota,"''
he stammered. "You know, that's at
tough one to choose. Well, now let'st
see. Rice picked Penn last week.
Today he says Minnesota. Fine."
So Evy circled Northwestern. 3
Harmon evidently paid a visit to
the "Three Men On A Horse" Pro-
duction this week. He grabbed his
list raced to the bus depot, and
spent the day riding back and forth
from Ypsilanti.
It didn't uncover his clairvoyant
talents, however, for upon his return
he resorted to the "hey" system.
When we saw him, he was stretch-
ed out in the locker room as the
rest of the gridders were getting
dressed for yesterday's practice ses-
sion.
"North Carolina at Fordhain,"
pondered the Hammer. "Heck, any-
body can win that one. I wonder.
Hey Sukup, who do you like, Ford-
ham or North Carolina. Fordhm,
huh. Yeh, that's what I thought."
Tom had a difficult 'time, sure.
"Hey, Frutig. .. . Hey, Fritz . . . and
after 20 "heys," today Harmon is
an expert.
As far as moron Chandler is con-
cerned, there was no system. He
stared for a moment at the list of
games, and the print became so
frightened at his unpleasant map
tan exact duplicate, my friends, you
will find directly over his Scratchy
Pad these days) that it just literally
romped into place.
Our city editor knows so little
about football that he thought
UCLA stood for Uncle Chandler's
Literature and Arts School. So he
picked Stanford.
My system is simple and air-tight.
I can't possibly lose today. Here is
what I did. I picked each team to
lose. For example, I marked my list,
North Carolina to lose, NYU to lose,
Kansas State to lose, etc.
If the teams I picked to lose lose,
naturally I get full credit. And if by
chance, the teams I picked to lose
win, what more could you ask for.
I get credit there too for picking the
winner. I am selling the system to
big money interests in New York. A
tremendous price, Yep.

In the meantime, till that dough
comes in, the four of are placing
a slight wager on today's choices.
We each put a dime in the pool for
each mistake we make. Winner
takes all.
Shoot the money to me, honey.
Ken Overlin Rallies
To Outpoint Belloise'
NEW YORK, Nov. 1-i/)-Ken Ov-
erlin, the playboy ex-sailor from Vir-
ginia, came up off the floor tonight,
survive denough fistic bombs to blow
him apart, and retained his middle-
weight championship by outpointing
Steve Belloise in 15 wild rounds at+
Madison Square Garden.
Floored in the sixth round by a
right-hand smash, and on the verge
of a knockout for the last two min-
utes of that heat as the young Bronx
Belte threw everything in his book,
Overlin came back to administer a
classic boxing lesson and win like a
champion should.
The Asscoiated Press score card
gave him ten rounds, with four for
Belloise and one even. Both judges,
- tnrae T ernnd r1George TK11v.

4

Big Ten Rivals
To Meet Today
Before_48,000I
Irish Favored To Drub'
Army; Cornell Choice
To Defeat Columbia
NEW YORK, Nov. 1. -W)- You
will need look no farther than Dyche
Stadium at Evanston, Ill., for tomor-
row's most important football game.
There Northwestern and Minne-
sota will play the first episode in a
three-team round robin that will.
settle the Western Conference cham-
pionship and should have a strong
bearing on national championship
pretensions. Michigan, the other
member of this all-winning trio, is
resting up for its home stretch drive
in which the Wolverines will meet
both the Gophers and the Wildcats.
This will be the day's only game
pairing two major unbeaten-untied
teams,tandit will pack Dyche Sta-
dium to its 48,000 capacity. Else-
where there will be larger crowds,
but it's doubtful there will be more
bone-crushing /impact anywhere.
Notre Dame and Army, as usual,
will take the attendance palm, with
78,000 due at Yankee Stadium despite
the fact an Irish victory is almost
a foregone conclusion. Unbeaten
Navy against once-beaten Penn will
bring 68,000 to Philadelphia's Frank-
lin Field; unbeaten Clemson against
Tulane 'will draw 40,000 at New Or-
leans; 20,000 will see Texas A. and M.'
meet recovering Arkansas, and on
the West Coast pace-setting Stan-
ford will play U.C.L.A. before 55,000.
Cornell, on the other hand, No. 1
team in the Associated Press ranking
poll, will have only some 12,000 wit-
nesses for its clash with Columbia,
although the Lions gave the Big Red
Iits biggest scare of all in 1939.

Gopher Leader

Day Off Gives
Crisler Chance
To Scout Foes
Varsity Mentor May JoinI
Oosterbaan To Witness
Gopher-Wildcat Clash t
In arranging an open date for
Michigan's gridmen today, the
schedule-makers inadvertently gave
Coach Fritz Crisler an opportunity to
take a postman's holiday, to jaunt,
over to Evanston and scout unbeaten1
Minnesota and Northwestern.
Undecided last night. Crisler put
off until this morning his final de-
cision, but it is regarded as probable
that he will make the trip along with I
Bennie Oosterbaan, Wolverine head
scout and end coach.
If the Michigan mentor does go
on his scouting mission, he will be
able to obtain first hand knowledge
concerning two dangerous future
Maize and Blue opponents. A week
from today the Crislermen invade
the Gophers' lair for a most crucial
conference clash, and the following
week Northwestern's Wildcats will
challenge the Wolverines in the Sta-
dium.
Hindered to a great extent by the
inclement weather the varsity squad
yesterday worked mainly on funda-
mentals and a few new plays, re-
served as a surprise for the Gophers.
Regular guard Milo Sukup was
still a sideline spectator yesterday,
his slight brain concussion making
it imperative that he rest until next
week.

Tippy' Lockard1
Rough, So H
By ART HILL
He'd rather block than carry the
ball. That's the tip-off on Harold
(Tippy)~ Lockard, hard driving half-
back of the Michigan football squad.
Tippy, who started the season as
the Wolverine second-string fullback
was shifted, two weeks ago, to the
wingback spot where he finds plenty
of competition in Davey Nelson
Norm Call and Paul Kromer.
When questioned as to whether he
would prefer to play fullback or half-
back, Lockard's reply is a classic.
Prefers Wingback's Job
"Fullback," he points out, "is a
position where you get plenty of
chanceto drive through the line,
and that's a lot of fun. But there's
more blocking at the wingback spot,
and I'd rather block."
This would seem to indicate that
Lockard is not afraid of rough going.
In fact, he thrives on it.
Tippy is not a newcomer to the
gridiron game. He played three years

Bill Anderson, who shares the
captaincy of the Minnesota eleven
with center Bob Bjorcklund, is one
of the oustanding wingmen in the
Big Ten Conference this season.
Ufer, Soph Track Star,
To Undergo Operation
Bob Ufer, Michigan's promising
sophomore trackman, will undergo
a minor nose operation this morning
at University Hospital in order to
correct a deviated septum which has
hindered his breathing while run-
ning.
Confined to the Hospital last night,
Ufer is expected to be in good con-
dition again in a week or so.
As a yearling dashman and middle
distance performer last year, Bob
established a number of freshman
track records, while tying several
more, and it is expected that he will
add considerable strength to Coach
Ken Doherty's Big Ten champion-

Likes To Play Many Wolverine Fans
To See Govher Game
'S Blocking NOW The fact that the Michigan-
Minnesota game is scheduled to be
at CantonO High School in one layedin Minneapolis.700 miles from
at Cnto O.' Hgh Shoo inoneAnn Arbor. will not deter a good-
of the toughest prep football leagues sized delegation of Wolverine fans
in the country. During the three from following their favorites.
years Tippy was there. they lost According to ticket manager Harry
only three games, all to Massilon Tillotson, 4,700 tickets for the Wol-
High School which is famed through- verine-Gopher clash, next Saturday.
out the nation as the producer of have already been sold through the
more star college gridders than any Michigan ticket office, and an addi-
other school in the country. tional order for 1.800 ducats has been
Weighing 183 pounds and standing sent to Minneapolis.
only 5 feet 9 inches. the Ohio lad isn't
exactly a giant. But he doesn't let The Sports Building will be open
that hold him back. every Sunday beginning this
"Nobody ever thought I'd be this I weekend from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
big," he says. "I only weighed 165 The swimming pool will be avail-
when I graduated from high school able to students from 3 to
so I figure the extra twenty pounds 5:30 p.m.
are about all I could ask." Intramural Sports Dept.
Blocf Provides Big Thrill
It's interesting, too, to hear Tiptl b he g t rlo
tell about the biggest thrill he got
out of high school football. It wasn't 0 P
a ninety-yard run or a goal-line " PLEDGE
tackle, justadblock. But what a 0F R A
block! He made it in a game against FORM;YALS
Huntington (W. Va.) High School
and it helped to shake the ball car-
rier into the clear for a long run by
taking not one but three opponents
completely out of the play. F VORS
As for that nickname, well, he *
doesn't know how he got it. "I've
had it since I was five years old,"
he says, "so I guess it's just about *
permanent now. I don't know how*9 See
it started. Maybe it's. because I was Ruth Ann Okes
so small."
Big or small, halfback or fullback,0at
Tippy'll be in there fighting against BURR PATTERSON & AULD *
Minnesota in the Wolverines' next 1209 South "U."
contest. And fight is something the
men of Crisler will need plenty of if __ ___ ___ ___ __
they're going to defeat the Gophers e
Th'ey're plenty tough. adTssi s
t i _

GRIDIRON
TIPS

M
I
M
h
M
I
F
F

S' ' I

FRESHMEN
All candidates for the freshman
basketball squad are urged to re-
port with equipment to Waterman
Gym, Monday at 7:30 p.m.
Ray Fisher, Coach

ship outfit in1
campaign.

the forthcoming cinder

Varsity Grid Stars Match Wits With The Daily's

GAME
North Carolina-Fordham.
Missouri-N.Y.U. ........ . .
Kansas State-Mich. State . .
Notre Dame-Army.......
Minnesota-Northwestern
Ohio State-Indiana .......
Purdue-Iowa ..............
Wisconsin-Illinois........
Nebraska-Oklahoma\......
Penn-Navy ...............
Cornell-Columbia .........
Yale-Brown .... . ........ .
Princeton-Harvard .......
Duke-Georgia Tech .......
Tennessee-L.S.U...........
Mississippi-Vaniderbilt .....
S.M.U.-Texas .............
Texas A.&M.-Arkansas ....
Oregon State-California ...
Stanford-U.C.L.A. .........

WIRTCHAFTER
Fordham
Missouri
Michigan State
Notre Dame
Minnesota
O.S.U.
Purdue
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Penn
Cornell
Brown
Princeton
Duke
Tennessee
Mississippi
Texas
Texas A.&M.
California
Stanford

EVASHEVSKI
Fordham
Missouri
Kansas State
Notre Dame
Northwestern
O.S.U.
Iowa
Illinois
Nebraska
Penn
Cornell
Brown
Princeton
Duke
Tennessee
Mississippi
S.M.U.
Texas A.&M.
California
Stanford

CHANDLER
North Carolina
Missouri
Kansas State
Notre Dame
Minnesota
O.S.U.
Iowa
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Penn
Cornell
Yale
Princeton
Duke
Tennessee
Mississippi
S.M.U.
Texas A.&M.
Oregon State
Stanford

Experts
HARMON
Fordham
N.Y.U.
Michigan State
Notre Dame
Minnesota
O.S.U.
Purdue
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Penn
Cornell
Brown
Princeton
Duke
Tennessee
Vanderbilt
S.M.U.
Texas A.&M.
California
Stanford

(Number 4)
THE QUARTERBACK
The quarterback is the field gen-
eral on both offense and defense.
Plays are called in a sequence for
a purpose; that is, one play sets up
another. A play must be run around
an end to force the defensive end
to drift away from the line; then
one is thrown inside the unsuspect-
ing end since he can be blocked out
more easily than before.
Direct line plays pull the defense
in close and then plays are called
to be run outside the end. Fake
reverses and spinners confuse the
defense; thus, when the true re-
verse or spinner is called, the op-
position is caught off guard.
If a new man is sent into the de
fensive line, a play is quite ofter
called to run through his position
Since he is not as warmed-up as the
others, his defensive skill is not ul
to par. Also, he may not be com
pletely acquainted with the opposinE
attack.
Passes are effective against a
close defense and tend to spread
it so that line plays will be more
successful.
A good kick is often as good a
running plays for it can easily pu
the defense back on its heels. It ma
also make way for a possible pas
interception or fumble recovery deel
in enemy territory.
THE
HELPED BILLY WITH
HIS HOMEWORK!

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6

i
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7'te ienel /4tel

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Ritter, Nation

as

Top Cheerleader,

Leads Michigan Grandstand Yells

By LYONS HOWLAND
Unknown, perhaps, to most Wolver-
ine grid fans is the fact that Michi-
gan has more than one All-American
out there on the field every Satur-
day.
Michigan's other All-American is
one Andrew Mowbray Ritter, seeded
for the past two years the nation's
leading cheerleader. Awarded All-
American cheerleading honors at the
University of North Carolina by Gam-
ma Sigma, National Honorary Cheer-
leaders' Fraternity of which he is now
president, "Andy" came to Ann Arbor
last year, but did not lend his talents
to the Wolverine football parade until
the current grid season.
Students of mob psychology as well
as acrobatics, college cheerleaders' go
through a course of training before
they are allowed to lead crowds in uni-
fied noise making. The main object
is to run the football show to extract
a maximum amount of noise with a
minimum amount of silence.
And so it was with Ritter. The like-
able 'Carolina 'Kid,' who hails from
Altoona, Pa., received his rookie train-
ing at the far-famed Mercersburg
Prep, and at Oberlin College, as well
as North Carolina. Typical of a born
laugh artist, "Andy" makes friends
easily and is known for his tremen-
dous store of vitality.
Ritter, cited by sportswirters and
sportscasters, as well as Gamma Sig-

ma, was judged on the basis of three
criteria: (1) reaction attracted from
the cheering section; (2) judgment in
selecting the best psychological mo-
ment for a cheer; (3) proficiency in
acrobatics. Acrobatics took first place
in Andy's interest.
However, "Rit" was not content
with the conventional back flips; he
went right on and thought up his
own. Main one is the "Ritter Span,"
invented three years ago, in which
the performer leaps into the air,
twists his body into a horizontal arc,

"which he holds momentarily," then
lights on his hands, flips his feet
over his head and finishes as erect
as a West Point cadet. Try it out
sometime. Gamma Sigma statistics
show only seven men in the country
can do it.
So watch for ole Andrew next time.
He's that extra lively leader out there
with All-American emblem on his
sweater front. "Be sure and screech
till you're bleached for the scream
team on Saturday," gravely admon-
ishes Mr. Ritter.

Give your child bet-
ter light for better
sight... phone your
Detroit Edison office for a checkup
of your lighting with the Light
Meter. No charge.

126 East Huron

Phone 4241

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