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November 01, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
I

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1,

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. .. ... .. ........ ..

Quiz Program
Series To End
HereTonight
The fourth and last of a series of
four pre-election Political Quiz pro-
grams will be held-at 8 p.m. today
in the circuit court room of the court-
house, with two Republicans and two1
Democrats sitting on the board of
"experts."
According to Mrs. A. M. Waldron
and Mrs. F. H. Yost, Jr., co-sponsors
of the series, three of the "experts"
will be S. S. Utley, Detroit author,
Republican; Leland Bisbee, a Repub-
lican Jackson attorney; and Mrs.
Arthur Bromage, wife of Professor
Bromage of the political science de-
partment. The fourth member will
be either Frank FitzGerald, Demo-
cratic candidate for Senator, or Prof.
Slosson ,of history department, who
will speak for Roogvelt.
SALE
Friday and Saturday
1/4 off on CASUALS
Blacks and colors
22 and 23 head sizes.
DANA RICHARDSON
523 East Liberty St.
Michigan Theatre Bldg.

Concert Pianist
Rudolph Serkin
Will Play Here
Rudolph Serkin, internationally
known pianist, will give the second
recital in the sixty-second Choral
Union Concert Series 8:30 p.m. Thurs-
day in Hill Auditorium.F

Church Guilds
Annual Meeting
Begins Today

Advice To Faculty And Students
Given._By 'Chronicle' Of 1869

Dworkis Wins Conely Scholarship

Rev. A. J. Muste
100 Protestant
In Conference

To Lead
Students
Today

More than 100 students represent-

Serkin, who is still in his early ing the student guilds of the eleven
thirties, appeared here once before Protestant Churches of the city will
in a May Festival concert where he
received an outstanding ovation for

his dynamic rendition of Beethoven's
"Emperor Concerto." His concert
Thursday will be composed of Mo-!
zart. Beethoven, Mendelssohn and
Paganini-Liszt numbers.
Born in Czechoslovakia of Rus-
sian parents, Serkin started his mus-
ical studies early, although his debut
was delayed until he reached the age
of 12 when he played with the Vienna
Symphony Orchestra. Since then he
has established his reputation in
France, England, Italy, Switzerland,
Spain and Austria.
A few seats for the concert may
still be had at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society, or after 7 p.m.
on Thursday at the Hill box-office.
Serkin came to America six years
ago, and after playing one perform-
ance at Carnegie Hall in New York
found himself with an established
reputation here. The following year
he accepted invitations from eight
major symphony orchestras to appear
with them-16 performances in all.
Since then he has a/lternated ap-
pearances with almost all the great
American orchestras with individual
recitals, making annually a trium-
' phal tour of the country.

Although Daily publication traces
back all the way to 1890, other papers
in University history also boasted
several years of continuous publica-
tion. The one immediately preced-
ing the Daily was The Chronicle,
which was edited by Michigan stu-
dents from 1869 to 1883.
The first issue of the paper, which
appeared semi-monthly in the form
of a two double-column news maga-
zine, came out on Sept. 25, 1869.
The editors described the purpose of
the paper to be a "medium of com-
muncation between professors and
students" and promised that partisan
viewpoints would not be taken, but
that editorials would try to look at
both sides, "caring only that truth
shall triumph."
Articles Varied
Articles in the new magazine dur-
ing the first year ranged from criti-
cisms of the University to all forms
of advice to students and faculty
members. One editorial was devot-
ed to reforms needed by "Michigan
Lee Pattison,
Noted Pianist,
To Give 'alk
Concluding his four-day visit to
Ann Arbor, Lee Pattison. pianist and
composer, will present a University
Lecture on "Have We an American
Folk Music" at 4:15 p.m. today in
the Rackham Auditorium.
Between 10 a.m. and noon today.

University. Shorthand should be
part of the curriculum, urged one
writer, as anyone familiar with the
"art" could testify. Also, students
should be well versed in mathematics
before they come to the University.
The science course, said the same
writer, is "from the small number of
graduates. confessedly a failure and
should be turned over to a new de-
partment in the University of Agri-
culture and Mechanic Arts." Accord-
ing to this judge, the mining and
civil engineering courses should suf-
fer the same fate.
Frosh, Sophs Battled
Continuous "BlackFriday" wa;
carried on, to judge from an article
of the Chronicle of 'fig-"Every stu-
dent at chapel Thursday could see
that the class of 73 were beginning
to learn that it was their duty no
longer to endure peltings with shot,
apples, etc. etc., from their heredi-
tary enemies (the sophomores) with-
out some show of resistance." The
bulletin goes on to tell of the retali-
ation by the freshmen and the re-
sulting battle between the two classes.
The editors in their own words "re-
ferred frankly to the incapacity of
certain professors" and devoted one
discussion to what constituted a good
professor. They specified that he
should know his subject well, since
it is difficult to conceal ignorance
from an intelligent class.
Professional Qualifications
Other qualifications fr a profes-
sor were that he know English well
enough so that he would not make
mistakes in grammar and that he
have the necessary elements of a

Martin B. Dworkis. Grad., has been
awarded the $250 Edwin F. Conely
Scholarship in Government.
The award was established in 1936
by Fanny Butterfield Conely in mem-
ory of her husband, Professor of Law
at the University from 1891 to 1893.
The scholarship is awarded to a
student receiving the degree of Bach-
elor of Arts from the College of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts during

k U

Matinees
25c incl. Tax

MICHIGAN

Nights
40c inc. Tax

the current year whQ merits distine-
tion in political science, so that he
may be enabled to spend the follow-
ing year in study in this field at the
Horace H. Rackham School of Gradu-
ate Studies.
Dworkis is speaker for the Student
Senate, vice-chairman of the Univer-
sity Progressive Council and chairman
of the Forensics committee of the
Hillel Foundation.

YOU'LL
LAUGH-
NOW $
a, s
wth MARY BETH HUGHES
GREGORY RATOFF . JOHN PAYNE
ANNE BAXTER . LIONEL ATWILL
2 ~ OW A Twentieth Century-Fox Picture

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The Michigan Wolverine Student Cooperative, Inc.
announces
The Club Wolverine
A WEEKLY, SOCIAL OCCASION

1

REV. A. J. MUSTE
* * *
open their annual Inter-Guild Con-
ference here today under the leader-
ship of Rev. A. J. Muste, national
secretary of the Fellowship of Recon-
ciliation.
Registration for the delegates to
the conference will be held from 7
to 9 p.m. today in Lane Hall, William
Clark, '42, president o fthe Inter-
Guild Council and director of the
Conference announced. Twenty res-
ervations are available for students
acting as campus-at-large delegates
in addition to the 10 representatives
for each guild, he said.I
A contributor to national maga-
zines such as the New Republic, Na-
tion, and Christian Century, Rev.
Muste has been a leader in liberal
movements during the past decade.
He has been a prominent leader of
strikes and labor organization partic-
ipating in textile, automobile and
rubber disputes. Also Rev. Muste
has been a contributor to a recent
book on labor questions.
After 1936, the noted liberal aban-
doned the left-wing politics and be-
came a religious pacifist in his views
of international politics.
He will lead discussion groups Sat-1
urady afternoon and Sunday at Lane
Hall presenting his main address of
the meeting, "The Evangelical Re-
sponsibility of the Christian" at 2
p.m. Sunday in the Union.

Every Saturday Evening,

8:30 to 12:00

-Sunday -
GUS ARNHEIM

MICH.- PENN
News Travel

PICTURES
Cartoon

1

I

Minimum Charge: 50c the Couple

DANCING

0 REFRESHMENTS

I

Table Reservations at the Lobby Store, phone 2-1124
209 South State Street

he will continue his series of confer-
ences on the problems of piano peda-
gogy in the Assembly Hall, third floor
of Rackham Auditorium. Attendance
at the meeting is required of all ap-
plied music majors and graduates,
seniors and juniors in the School of
Music.
Assisted by Prof. Hardin Van Deur-
sen of the voice department, Mr. Pat-
tison will attempt to show his audi-
ence that "there really is an Ameri-
can folk music." Several different
types will be explained and illus-
trated.
Extension Service
Starts Art Classes
New classes in ceramics and paint-
ing were begun last night at the
Architecture Building under the
sponsorship of the Extension Serv-
ice.
The ceramics class, conducted by
Mr. G. D. Cole, will deal with clay
construction and' modeling, glaze
making, application, and the study
of the material used in studio pottery.
The course is open to both beginners
and advanced students.
Mr. Emil Weddige will direct a
course in drawing and painting from
models and setups which will in-
clude the study of techniqie and,
composition.
Mrs. Jane C. Stanley
Dies After Brief Illness
Mrs. Jane C. Stanley, Ann Arbor
artist whose works were widely ex-
hibited, died at the age of 78 yes-
terday morning after a brief illness.
She was the mother of Prof. George
M. Stanley of the geology depart-
ment.
Mrs. Stanley's work was familiar
to Ann Arbor residents in the draw-
ings of campus buildings on post
cards at the League. Funeral serv-
ices will be held Monday at 10 a.m.
at Muehlig's Funeral Chapel.

gentleman. "It is no mark of a gen-
tleman," indignantly expounded the
editor, "nor indeed, is it indicative
of superior mental power for a pro-
fessor to arrogantly demand that a
class master a subject in one day up-
on which they ought to spend a
week . .
Copies of this paper are in the
library of the Board in Control of
Student Publications and were pre-
sented to the Board by Junius E. Beal,
82, former Chronicle editor and Re-
gent of the University, 1908-1940.
Don't let the rain get
c the best of your hair.
Get a permanent
at the
Q xoBEAUTY SALON0
1205 S. University Phone 4818
$3.50 up 6
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if you're going to be..-
at the
MICHIGAN LEAGUE

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Startling Specials
at Marshall's!

for the

Between 9:30 --1:00 A.M.

231 South State Street

Phone 5933

00

$1.10 per Couple

Tickets at Union and League

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PERFORMANCES TO-DAY at 2-4-7-9- P.M.
STARTS MUSIC AND COMEDY
TO-DAY! THAT IS DIFFERENT!

and .: 4
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American uadsEnm M adr
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Prices Effective Friday and Saturday, Nov. 1 st & 2nd
We Will Cash Your Checks! Postage Stamps at Cost!
J1 One Ounce
PudStationery Serlie
Pound S-i -e
Briggs Special Cotton
20 Sheets C to
93c 20 Envelopes 2c
50c Yeast Foam Tablets 28c 250 - Milk Magnesia Tablets 39c
"Velour" Liquid Jergens -Woodb
Hollywood Powder
Puffs Antiseptic Soaps
PLi ster's 2
5 for 9c Qt 39c up to 15c Values
Dozen Aspirins 1c "Excellent Mouth Wash" All 5c gums, Mints, Candys 3/10
$1.00 Wrisley's
KremlAfter; Shaving
Hair Tonic P c L
59Cc 19

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