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October 20, 1940 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-20

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1940

THE .D.S..U.J AZNJrD.LTTV

PA441V avvrv

aTUE :. MIa ula1 u A lri 1'tV AfE' 1-1 1.L :I. ~ z~

rA"E lll r, 3 VI N

I

Ruth Draper To Appear Qct. 29
With a series of her own "Charac- tion to her performances in cities
ter Sketches," Miss Ruth Draper will throughout the United States, Miss

- - -

open the 1940-41 Oratorical Associa- Draper has ap
tion Lecture Series, Oct. 29 in Hill Paris, Berlin, Vie
Auditorium, Madrid and Wa
The reasons for Miss Draper's abil- Another reas
ity to attract audiences in direct is that herraud
competiton with other stage plays or be disappointed
musical shows has long puzzled book- terial. Fortuna
ing agents and press representatives. her own autho
There are probably two important
reasons for this exceptional showing. may add or cut
First, her audiences have been built sees an improve
up through playing in innumerable I periment at wi]
cities throughout the world. In addi- disturbed by her

ppeared in London,
enna, Salzburg, Rome,
arsaw.
on for her popularity
iences seem never to
in her work or ma-
tely, Miss Draper is
r and director, and
t her part when she'
ement. She can ex-
.1-no one's cues are
actions.

Church Groups
Will Discuss
MauySubjects,
Music, Student Discussion,
Sermons, All Contribute
To Today's Programs

Here Is Today's News Lacking $12.844.84 of its quota of tars of their goal." Clague pointed raised to maitain the local relief
In Summary $56,000, the Ann Arbor Community out. "If workers will make every agencies and civic organizations.
F und extended the drive until next effort to reach prospective givers who --
Emmet Richards, editor and pub- Wednesday, in the hope of making have not yet made a pledge, I am Floods Inundate Barcelona
lisher of the Alpena News was elect- Apth d ncy7 sure tei dremaining $13,000 will be
ed president of the University Press goal was reached, the sum compares Clague also asked persons who have --Flood waters in the eastern Pyre-
Club of Michigan at its closing ses- favorably with last year's campaign not been contacted by workers and nees smashed homes and factories,
sion yesterday. which had a total of $32,409 at its who wished to aid the campaign to disrupted telephone and road com-
* * * official close. send their pledges to the Community munications, and took an estimated
I Ashlev C'lnr- rhair a of +h ini Rln o nr it a nm|t _ -_ _. ..

Ann Arbor

Community Fund To Extend Charity Drive

Discussion
scheduled for
organizations
neighborhood

of various topics is
the numerous student
and sermons in the
churches today.

_ E

DE

S

TINED

FOR

THE

Accompanied by an all Ceasar
Franck organ recital, the sermon at
10:30 this morning at the First Bap-
tist Church will deal with the prob-
lem 'What About Sin?"
Rev. Yoder will speak at the Trin-
ity Lutheran Church this morning
at 10:30 on the subject "To Have Is
To Owe." At St. Paul's Evangelical
Lutheran Church the sermon in the
morning will be on the Parable of
the Wicked Servant. Episcopal stu-
dents today will participate in the
celebration of Harris Hall Day.
Rev. Schmale will deliver a sermon
on "Christianizing America" this
morning at the Bethlehem Evangeli-
cal Church. At the First Congrega-
tional Church, Rev. Parr will speak
on "The Hidden Issues of the Fu-.
ture."
At the Unitarian Church, 11 o'clock
this morning will see Rev. Marley
speaking on "Life-Episodal or Ep-
ochal."
Harold Golds, Ann Arbor attorney
and member of the local draft board,
will discuss "America' First Peace-
Time Conscription" at 7:30 p.m. The
meeting is open to all and Mr. Golds
will answer any questions on the pro-
visions of the bill.

A fire of unknown origin at Ries-c
enweber's restaurant, 112 W. Huron
St., early Saturday morning causedt
an estimated damage of $1,000. Much
of the destruction was caused by the
intense heat of the blaze.
* * *
A new board of control has been
appointed at the Armory to take the
place of the departing Co. K offi-
cials. C. W. Tuomy, Col. A. C. Pack
and E. H. Schlenker are the new gov-
ernors. They replace Maj. Kenneth
Hallenback and Capt. G. J. Burlin-
game, who will be on active duty at
Camp Beauregard, La.
With ticket sales progressing satis-
factorily, final plans are being made
for the Co. K banquet to be held
Monday at the Unioh.
CORRECTION
In yesterday's Daily it was er-
roneously stated in a headline but
not in the article that Gerhart
H. Seger who sppke here Friday
was a former Nazi. Seger was nev-
er a member of that party.

94

7o0 toe

tiaimuy k iague, c ai rman of the Ftund. money neea not accompany toll of 250 lives, relief officials said
campaign, announced the extension the cards, he said. tonight. Property damage was very
"We are ahead of last year, and even- Leaders of the drive have stated I heavy and Spain's best textile factory
tually they came within a few dol- that the full amount, $56,000, must be at Nanlleu was a total loss.

I

Star

-I

wit

nours

'DANCE
N- ON ORA
' UNION FORMAL

TOPS

I

I

November 1

YAK W
KIM
'fir{:} 'r '{"
;s
t
WE Mal
t ""f
wfill

INTERFRATERNITY

BALL

I

November 8

ENGINERS' BALL
November 8

2.95

HABERDASHER SHIRTS making news in gay
Sanforized-shrunk cottons. Left: Glamis
Madras in very bright blue, red or green
plaid. Right: Multi-color striped cham-
bray with Peter Pan collar and mannish
French cuffs of white pique.
Basic Skirts

C ,
d

EVERY FALL FORMAL will bring a galaxy of
the dance floor. White leads the parade of many

gay new formals onto
colors and simplicity

highlights the styles. Sparkling sequins and smart nail-head designs add
glamour to so many of these gowns, whether they are fashioned in delicate
chiffon, light-as-air wool, or sophisticated crepe. Come in and see them
all. You'll find there is one or several just meant for you.
$1695. $39.95

FOR BRIGHT LIGHTS

.4 . .

FOR GAY

EVENINGS.

. .

='s
Saddles + Sc
CAMPUS CLASSIC in a well-
made version by Saddle-Mas-
ter. Styled as you want them
in sturdy white calf with
brown saddle and red rubber
soles.

IMPORTANT yariable in mix-
match outfits. Monotone tweeds,
featherweight wools, plaids, gab-
ardines, whipcords: Some with
button-on pinafore tops. Brown,
black, "neutrals", colors.

3.95
to
10.95

l - c :;.f .,ir:-
t f' . Y.
~~ k

EVENING GOWNS that will receive as many compli-
ments as there are stars in the sky! You'll find the new
puff sleeves, deep bodices, and that new "covered-up"
look! Choose. them in nets, rich crepes, smooth velveteens
-and all so reasonablely priced that you can't resist
them!

iddles

+ Saddles

Party Sandal
of
SILVER KID
GOLD KID
WHITE SATIN
GLAMOUR (and the stag line) at your
feet if you're wearing these slim, exquisite
sandals! A thrilling array, perfectly priced
. . . with your favorite material, your
favorite heel.
$3.95 and $4.95

11

I

4.9

III

1111

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11

II)

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