100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 18, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO
Service Fraternity
To welcome new members into the
organization,-the Gamma Pi chapter
of the Alpha Phi Omega national
service fraternity met yesterday at
the Michigan Union. Reports of last
year's projects were reviewed, and

THE MICHIG(AN bATTV

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1940

1 11 l1 iil 1 O.i it 1 i7 h 1\ L Ll i L

Greets

Newcomers

Heavyweight

Champion Registers

v

the "Use The Walks" campaign es-
pecially lauded.
Plans are being laid for the in-
stallation of an official Michigan
chapter and Committees were ap-
pointed for the drawing up of tenta-
tive social, meeting, and 2roject pro-
grams.

* '~
The constables from
the press daiced in
the streets after a
first look at
THE END
OF A DAY"
-Walter Winchell
LYDIA
MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
October 18, 19.
Fri. and Sat.
at 8:15 P.M.
All seats reserved.
ADMISSION 35c
Box Office Open 10:45-8:30
For Reservations, Call 6300

-d

Fund Appeals
To Workers
As Total Lags
Only a day and a half remain for
its campaign and the Ann Arbor
Community Fund drive has reached
but 69% of its total of $56,000, ac-
cording to the last audit.
With the final day fast approach-
ing,, Ashley Clague, general campaign
chairman, issued an urgent appeal to
all workers to make a special effort
to contact all remaining prospects,
in order that the quota may be
reached within the time limit.
The University division reported
the highest total for the last audit
with $1,837, bringing its total up to
$4,185.
"The importance of caring for the
less fortunate of our community is
being recognized by the American
people," Clague said. "While our sym-
pathies go out to the suffering hu-
manity abroad, at the same time we
probably realize that our first task
is to preserve the precious heritage
of democracy in America."

Gerhart Seger
{Will Lecture
Today On War
Former Political Prisoner
To Discuss PossibilityI
For German Triumph
Former Reichstag member Gerhart
H1. Seger, one of the first political
prisoners interned by the Hitler re-
-ime. will discuss "Can Hitler Win
This War?" in a University lecture
at 4:15 p.m. today at the Rackham
Building.
Mr. Seger was a prominent printer,
journalist and editor before being
elected to the German Reichstag and
its Committee on Foreign Relations.
He is now editor of the German week-
ly "Neue Volkszeitung," which is pub-
lished in New York with a national
circulation.
While waiting for citizenship eli-
gibility, Mr. Seger has delivered 756
lectures on European affairs to clubs
and audiences of all types in 42 states
of the Union.
At the time of his arrest in Ger-
many, Mr. Seger's wife and small
child were confined in a concentra-
tion camp for men until diplomatic
pressure initiated by women mem-
bers of the British Parliament se-
cured their release.
Mr. Seger's book "Oranienburg,"
which treats the growth of Nazism in
Germany, has been published in six
languages and has sold over 280,000
copies.

HENDKERCHIEF TEST PN
VITAL ZONE ALWAYS SPO
NO 600
CAN PASS
ITS HESSON
Always clean and free CUSHION GUARD
from goo no matter
how often you smoke
it. Challenging higher-
priced pipes
in briar quali- I
ty and value. " J
WM. PEMUTH & CO., NEW YORK

Each of these popular new
ARROW STYLES'
is featured i, the pro per tpe
of fabric in a choice of Patterns at
)1'9ller/g
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY
-- - - -

Joe Louis, the nation's No. 1 fighter-at least with his fists-regis-
tered for the military conscription in Chicago. Here he is signing up
before Registrar Virgil Cooke (right) as his co-manager, Julian Black,
looked on. He signed his name as "Joe Louis Barrow."
JoeLouis' Sister, Coed Here,
Wants Him To Quit Ring NoSlI'

Slide Rule Headquarters
ULRICH'S BOOK STORE
549 East University
rule
)
CAN YOU BE HAPPY WITH A "PRE-CIVIL WAR"
SLIDE RULE? ... READ

T

By A. P. BLAUSTEIN
Vunise Barrow, sister of heavy-
weight champion Joe Louis, wants
her brother to quit boxing. "it's not
that I don't like the game," she ex-
plained in an interview yesterday,
"it's just that I think Joe has been
in it long enough."
A native of Detroit, Miss Barrow is
beginning her first year at the Uni-
versity this semester as a graduate
student in history and at the same
time working for her teacher's cer-
tificate. "Marriage is out for the
present," she announced, "I'd rather
like to teach high school for a while
first."
Two things, she claims, were up-
permost in her mind when she came
to Ann Arbor-the first was to get
high marks and the second to avoid
publicity. "I thought I could do them
both too," Miss Barrow asserted, "but
I guess it's not possible now."
"My friends were able to keep my
name out of the papers during my
year-end a half at Wayne University
and my two and a half years at How-
ard University," she declared, "but I
suppose that it could not be done at
a school of this size."
Unfortunately for Miss Barrow's
hopes of avoiding publicity, Harry
Wickers, former state amateur ban-

tamweight champion, informed The
Daily that the "Brown Bomber's" sis-
ter was a student here late last week.
"Extremely eloquent in praise of
her brother who, is putting her
through school, Miss Barrow denied
any knowledge of the champion's
plans for the year. "All I know," she
said, "is that Joe's recently scheduled
bout in California has been called off
and that he will probably be fighting
in either New York or Chicago before
Christmas."
One thing that Miss Barrow did
want to point out about her brother,
however, was the fact that his famous
"dead pan" expression was not typi-
cal of the champion in everyday life.
"He only looks like that when he's
working or when he's posing for pho-
tographers," she said.
On the question of campus clothes
Miss Barrow was all on the side of
the college girl and her habit of wear-
ing the traditional skirt, sweater and
saddle shoes costume. "When any-
thing important is going on I wear
high-heeled shoes," she continued,
"but the saddle shoe is definitely- the
thing for classes."
She concluded by asking her class-
mates and instructors to please forget
that she was related to a celebrity
and asked that everyone treat her
"like a typical coed."

'Puppeteers'
Will Feature
Music Show
Headliners in miniature will return
to the Lydia Mendelssohn again on
October 25 and 26, under the deft
direction of the Yale Puppeteers, in
% new revue.
On this tour, the Puppeteers plan
an innovation. In addition to the
puppets, they will present a musical
comedy with human actors, "My
Man Friday." The music and lyrics
will be as usual by Forman Brown,
while the puppet and production will
again be designed by Harry Burnett,
who was graduated from Michigan
in 1923.
When the Puppeteers appeared in
Hollywood last spring, they consid-
ered the idea of returning there and
establishing another theatre there.
This summer they concluded ar-
rangements for such a theatre to
open there in late March. This will
be their farewell tour, after 12 years
of trouping.
On their last appearance here, the
Yale Puppeteerg presented anrevue,
"It's a Small World," including sat-
ires on Mrs. Roosevelt, Martha Gra-
ham and Mayor LaGuardia, among
others.
Mail orders are now being accepted
at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,
telephone 6300. The box office will
open Oct. 23. Tickets are 75 and 50
cents, all seats reserved.
Half U.S. Scrap Exports
Since '32 Went To Japan
NEW YORK, Oct. 17.-(P)-More
than half the 21,500,000 tons of scrap
iron and steel exported from the Unit-
ed States since 1932 went to Japan,
the American Iron & Steel Institute
said today in a study of the effects of
the scrap metal embargo placed by
the government earlier this week.

A freshman's dream is to look as smart as a senior
...dangle as many keys . . . and capture as
many hearts.
Tip to Frosh: Get Arrow Shirt
...their authentic styles and
new collar models are recoin-
mended bysthe big men on
the campus. More Arrows
are worn by college men
than any other shirtles an

b.

-' >-
Lift your ego with some
Arrows s.rin white, solid
colors, or stripes. All collar
sizes and sleeve lengths k $2 up.
Sanforized-Shrunk-fabric shrinkage
less than i%.

II

M

4' °

"How to Choose
a Slide Rule"
by DON HEROi.D
A lot of water has flown over the dam since
Lieutenant Armeded Mannheim invented his
Slide Rule in 1853. In this new book Don Herold
explains all the new wrinkles and tells you in
simple terms just what kind of Slide Rule will
make life belt for you. The book is handsomely
illustrated with drawings by the master himself.
It takes the mystery out of Slide Rules forever.
"How to Choose a Slide Rule" is free as free
-but only one copy to a customer. See your
campus K & E dealer at once.
EST. 1867
KEUFFEL & ESSER CO.
NEW YORK-HOBOKEN, N. J.
CHICAGO " ST. LOUIS
E SAN FRANCISCO - LOS ANGELES " DETROIT" MONTREAL

AFRI[LO/V SHIRTSx

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

I

111T'S RHUMOROUS
IT'S HELPFUL
IT'S Ff11

U -

MISCELLANEOUS -20
WE ARE EAGER to help sororities
and fraternities with their mail-
ings and programs. Edwards Let-
ter Shop, 711 N. University. Phone
2-2846. 6c
TYPING--18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. -Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
LAUNDERING -9

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

Monday, Oct. 21
ONE NIGHT ONLY

darned.
3c

MICHIGAN

PUBLIC HIT NO. 1
Rocking The Nation With Laughter
SAM H. HARRIS Presents
7?YMAOSS HART U. GEO. S. KAUFMAN
Authors of "YOU CAN'T ITAK IT WITH YOUIJ

STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates; Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
ARTICLES FOR SALE
PERSONAL STATIONERY - 100
sheets. 100 envelopes, printed with
your name and address-$1.00.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard St. 12c
FOR SALE-Cottage, Portage Lake.
Excellent location immediately ~on
. Dexter-Pinckney Road. R. R. Bu-
sick, 1659 Glynn Court, Detroit.
Phone Townsend 6-4855. 71
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 5c

ARROW SHIRTS are sold in downtown Ann Arbor at
Lindensc9midt &Apfel
209 South Main

]I

Price List
(All articles washed and ironed)
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries

WbJs

SAME CAST AS NOW CURRENT
AT CASS THEATRE, DETROIT
"The Funniest Comedy of the Season"
-Brooks Atkinson, N.Y. Times
"A Smash Hit" -Time Magazine
"Clicks From Curtain To Curtain"
-Walter Winchell
'Prices 83c, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20, $2.75

Shirts........
Undershirts ..
Shorts........
Pajama Suiti
Socks, pair ....
Handkerchiefs
Bath Towels
All Work
Also special

.............. .14
.............. .04
.. .04
.............. .10
.............. .03
............. .02
.............. .03
Guaranteed
prices on Coeds'

laundries,
are tely.
wools are

All
No
our

bundles done sep-
markings. Silks,
specialty.

.

I

Read The

Daily Classifieds!

MICHIGAN
ALL NEW thrills of
romance, drama,
laughs and excite-
ment!_
e .a
W11oNO CwERS"
Also Walt Disney's
11WJNDOW CLEANERS"

-.

9

DAILY 2-4 25c, 7-9 P.M. 40c Inc. Tax.
THE FUN STARTS TODAY! (A T MI

:z .;.. ;.,,_

III

I

s 111

is

1 111111

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan