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March 01, 1941 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1941-03-01

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AIL

u kA T" RFDIA

esses

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE REPLY CHURLISH
By TOUCHSTONE

Edited and managed by students of the University of
Michigan under the authority of the Board in Control
of Student Publications.
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session.
Member of the Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the
use for republication of all news dispatches credited to
it or not otherwise credited in this newpaper. All
rights of republication of all other matters herein also
reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class mail matter.
Subscriptions during the regular school year by
carrier $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
REPRESENI "E: FOk NATIONAL ADVERTIJiNG B-,
National Advertising Service, Lc1
College Publishers Representative
420 MADIsoN AVE. NEW YORK. N. Y.
CHICAGO * BOSTON * LOS ANGELES *"SAN FRANCISco
Member, Associated Collegiate Press, 1940-41

Editorial Stafff

Hervie Haufler
Alvin Sarasohn
Paul M. Chandler.
Karl Kessler
Milton Orshefsky
Howard A. Goldman
Laurence Mascott
Donald Wirtchafter
Esther Osser
Helen Corman

* . . . Managing Editor
. . Editorial Director
. . . . . City Editor
. . . . Associate Editor
. . . . Associate Editor
Associate Editor
Associate Editor
Sports Editor
.Women's Editor
* . Exchapige Editor

Business Staff
Business Manager .
Assistant Business Manager
Women's Business Manager
Women's Advertising Manager

Irving Guttman
Robert Gilmour
Helen Bohnsack
Jane Krause

NIGHT EDITOR: CHESTER BRADLEYv
The editorials published in The Michi-
gan Daily are written by members of The
Daily staff and represent the views of the
writers only.
ew America
And The War
F4OUR MONTHS after the publication
of Harold J. Laski's great manifesto
to the English people and government, "Where
Do We Go From Here?", Britain still stands. It
was Mr. Laski's thesis in his book that if Britain
was to survive the war, the British government
must capture the dynamic of the English masses
for such a tremendous effort by initiating a basic
social reconstruction of English society.
So convincingly written is Laski's message that
today many American liberals are ready to be-
lieve that every passing day of British resistance
means that democratic socialism in England is
nearer accomplishment. Speaking before an
Ann Arbor luncheon audience last week-end,
national director Thomas Wright of the liberal-
socialist political movement, New America, went
so far as to declare that he was ready to ask
that America participate militarily to aid the
British cause without even a declaration of war
aims by the Churchill government.
Many American liberals like Wright have
swallowed Laski's thesis, that survival of
Britain depends upon a social revolution
there, without digesting it. Of course Wright
and others may have come to their conclu-
sions independently of Laski, but the remark
is still very pertinent, that, when Laski
speaks of Britain's survival, he means sur-
vival of democratic institutions there. He
admits, though he does not think it probable,
that Britain mhay win militarily without any
basic social reconstruction, and will lose
denicracy through internal fascism after-
wards as one of the aftermaths of the war.
We must bear in mind, then, what the
foremost exponent of the "survival through
social reconstruction" theory means by sur-
vival. For Mr. Laski is quite frank in admit-
ting that the dominant privileged classes of
Englaid, the original appeasers who aided
And abetted Hitler's rise, are still trying to
beat Hitler with a minimum sacrifice of
their. own interests. Teyporary concessions
and promises, and the stark imminence of
Nazi conquest may be able to maintaioy that
devotion of the English masses to the united
war effort to give England a military victory.
Certainly such an interpretation of the so-
called "facts" of social reconstruction in Png-
land seems more valid in the light of all previous
experience. The situation maybe is unique as
Mr. Wright and others claim it to be, but it is
not so unique that the old-fashioned methods of
trickery, deception and concessions in a pinch
can be neatly ruled out,
The British emmissaries of privilege still dom-
inate the British cabinet and the parliament by
decided majorities. England's great labor leader,
Ernest Bevin, is placed in the position as secre-
tary in charge of production, a position where he
can most effectively help the British cause by
appealing to the English masses for their all-.
important labor, while to what ends their toil is
to serve is in the hands of men like Lord Halifax,
a representative of British privilege who was
active in aiding Hitler's ascent.
It is argued that high corporate levies, exten-
sion of some old-age pensions and unemploy-
ment insurance and the fact that most political

The source: Michigan Daily Activities Supple-
ment, Tuesday, February 25, 1941, page ten. The
headline:
GARG, HUMOR
MAGAZINE, HAS
VARIED STAFF
Members Are From All
Schools, Classes; See
Funny Side Of Campus1
News item: "The Michigan Gargoyle attempts to
interpret the humorous side of life on the Mich-
igan campus. To do this it is necessary to draw
staff members from every branch and class of
the University." News item (2): "It is a Gargoyle
tradition that anyone who has a real sense of
humor may become a staff member despite a
lack of specific abilities."
One Act Play: Scene, the office of The Gar-
goyle," a campus humor magazine. Thirty-seven
editors, drawn from all walks of life, sit quietly
tittering behind a long table. Cartoons, jokes,
cigarette butts, empty whiskey bottles, and other
props. Enter young boy, wearing freshman pot,
smoking pipe with class numerals.
Boy: PaxdQn me , but is this the -
All: Oh ha ha hd ha ha ha ha ha ha.
Boy: Ah, indeed, I see it oh heh heh heh hee
hee hee I see it is indeed the place I am seek-
ing.
All: Who was that lady we seen you with last
night?
Boy: (Brightly) That was no lady, that was
oh haw haw haw haw haw, I mean that was my
ha ha ha ha (he dies into prolonged giggle.)
Editor: (the one fifteenth from the left, no not
that one, the one with the glasses, yes that's
him) Young sir, ha ha ha, tell me, what do you
know that's funny about the Engine school?
Ha ha ha ha hee hee.
Boy: The Engine school? The uh huh huh ha
ha Engine School? Why the Engine school is
ha, ha ha, heh heh haw haw haw haw haw, why
months ago when they voted down a consid-
eration of Indian independence demands.
If British privilege is unwilling to even con-
sider an abrogation of sovereignty over an-
other people, can they be expected to allow
the sacrifice of national sovereignty that
woud be necessary for a peaceful European
order?
Yes, British reaction still rides the saddle
of power in England.
The right to criticize in war-time doesn't
mean that England is becoming more demo-
cratic. The coalition government dominated
by the representatives of British privilege
still rules the roost, holding the support of
the patient English people by the very immi-
nence of the danger and a show of repre-
sentation in the cabiet. All the condition-{
ing and culture of British privilege rules
that, in an even more dominant position
after the war, they will look to their interests
first with even more tragic post-war results
for the world than followed the first world
conflict.
Yes, Mr. Wright this war is unique in that in-{
extricably tied up with the imperial struggle is a
fundamental revolutionary force of nihilism
whose influence America feels today and cannot
escape tomorrow. There are differences between
England and Nazi Germany that make the Eng-
lish support worthy of our material support. We
are already in the war to that extent. But can
you, Kr. Wright, or any others, honestly ask
American youth to shed their blood for what
those who dominate England are fighting for?
Merely saying that we are in the war already
does not blur the fact that there is a vast differ-
ence between what material and military partici-
pation in the war will mean for America. Mili-\
tary participation will reach to the very fiber of
American youth, involve their entire ideals and
hopes and lives. If the American people suffer
once more the disillusionment that followed the
last war "for democracy" they will be psycho-.
logically and morally incapable of organizing
themselves democratically and peacefully do-
mestically or internationally.
How ask people to live democratically,
when democracy means nothing but dis-
illusionment? And to say that, after helping
defeat Hitler, America will enforce democrat-
ic morals in the world is to speak the shib-

boleth of the American super-patriot and
typical politician. The world will not be
made a moral world by a country that does
not first practice them itself. It is to that
task that America must first devote herself,
to make democracy work here in America.
Material aid to Britain, yes, but America
must have peace if she is to realize her pos-
sibilities. As Robert Maynard Hutchins,
president of the University of Chicago has
brilliantly put it:
"Some day if we stay out of war we may
perhaps understand and practice freedom
of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from
want and freedom from fear. We may even
be able to comprehend and support justice,
democracy, the moral order and the suprem-
acy of human rights. Today we have but
begun to grasp the meaning of the words ...
If we go to war we shall think no more of
justice, the moral order and the supremacy
of human rights. We shall have hope no
longer".
That is our first task, to become a real democ-
racy so that when we fight fascism, it will be
democracy that fights. If we fight today, even
if we help England beat Hitler by sending our
soldiers across, we will lose, lose the only thing
that is worth fighting for, the democratic heri-
tage that can be ours. This is the "new Ameri-

it's just aw haw haw uh uh uh (swallows, get's
breath) aw cut it out, you're killing me.
Another editor: Have you any specific abili-
ties?
ha ha ha ha.
(Young lady makes marks on piece of paper.
smiling.)
Still another editor: Are we uh tee hee hee haw
haw HAW, to understand that you wish to HAW
HAW HAW try out for this here, mag?
And Still Another Editor: Have you, hoo hoo
ho eh eh, had any experience in statistics? (He
falls off his chair in a fit of laughter.)
And Yet Another: Have you oh gosh it's kill-
ing me, hahahaha, have you heard the latest
HAW HAW HAW HAW?
Boy: I, ha ha he he he heh heh, I'll take the
job oof oof oof har!
All: (boy taking place with them behind table,
thus making thirty-eight editors, if you include(
the one who fell under the table) Ha ha ha ha
heh heh heh heh hee hee hee HA HA HA HA
HOO HOO HOO HEH HEH HEH HEH HAR
HAR HAR HAW HAW HAW HAWHAW.
(Curtain)
And while we're on the subject, because I
can't afford to send it to her, here is my own
dear open telegram to Shirley R. Wallace, who
was revealed to her own sweet, loving Touch-
stone and to the rest of the public, last Thurs-
day as the mysterious Stardust, and who lies
in sick bed, in Passaic no kidding, New Jersey.
mourning a lost appendix.
SR WALLACE
GENERAL HOSPITAL, BED PAN ALLEY
PASSAIC. NEW JERSEY
RAT,
YOUR DUPLICITY UNEQUALED IN MY EX-
PERIENCE SINCE MY LAST DATE WITH LU-
CREZIA BORGIA STOP AS AN OLD FRIEND
OF THE FAMILY'S I SHOULD HAVE BEEN
LET IN ON THE SECRET STOP SO YOU ARE
STARDUST ARE YOU QUESTION MARK
WELL COMMA LET ME TELL YOU SOME-
THING BABY SEMI COLON WHATEVER YOU
KNOW ABOUT MEN YOU LEARNED FROM
ME STOP OF ALL THE DOUBLE HYPHEN
DEALING DIRTY DEALS I EVER DREW YOU
ARE NUMBER ONE ON MY HIT PARADE
STOP BESIDES YOUR PICTURE FLATTERED
YOU STOP MY FAITH IN WOMANKIND IS
SHATTERED AS A RESULT OF YOU I CAN
CALL THEM NOTHING BUT FIBS STOP WHY
DOESN'T SOMEBODY TELL ME ABOUT
THESE THINGS QUESTION MARK I STILL
LOVE YOU COMMA STARDUST BUT AS FOR
YOU COMMA WALLACE COMMA JUST WAIT
UNTIL YOU GET BACK HERE STOP YOU
OWE ME ONE DINNER AT THE UNION STOP
BLACK OR WHITE TIE QUESTION MARK I
LOVE YOU DEAR STOP SO LONG UNTIL
SOON
TOUCHSTONE
I9
ART
The Ann Arbor Art Association has as its
current exhibition, in Alumni Memorial Hall, a
display of small-folio Currier and Ives prints,
and a collection of lithographs by the Japanese
painter, Yasuo Kuniyoshi. The show, while
distinctly of a minor sort, is pleasant and stim-
ulating to the eye. If the Kuniyoshi prints
come off with honors aesthetically, the Currier
and Ives lithographs certainly have the his-
toric and social significance.
It is a matter of considerable importance, one
may insist, to estimate justly and accurately
the importance of the Currier and Ives prints.
One must not fall over backwards into over-
praising them, but one may safely say that they
rank high in the history of American art. Cer-
tainly, they mark a genuinely native contribu-
tion, even,if they be on the primitive side. This
primitive character is displayed in the altogether
charming Mt. Vernon.. Such thing as Bolted or
Martin van Buren seem like pleasant country
cousins of Constatin Guys' equestian prints.
The Kuniyoshi prints give a cross-section of
the work of this distinguished painter. Here
may be seen his own personal invention applied

to the medium of the lithograph. How one re-
acts to these prints will depend on whether or
not one likes Kuniyoshi's peculiar idiom. This
is an ultra-smart and stylish sort of art. That
is possesses true style is another thing. If one
will accept the Kuniyoshi manner, several of
the pieces are rewarding. Among these are De-
serted Brickyard and Dress Form, both in soft,
grey tones. Squash and Pears and Grapes stand
out among the still-lifes. Perhaps the most ap-
pealing of the prints is the witty Milking Cow.
It has in it all the satire for which the artist
strives in vain in his many figure pieces.
-John Maxon
The Eagle Has Strong Wings
A #mock battle in British skies has dispelled
one of the most insidious reports of the war with
respect to aviation. No longer can the rumor
persist that the American combat planes are an
inferior product.
For when an American ship, in test combat,
recently "brought down" one of the famous
British Hurricanes, it proved more than an ac-
curate military assessment of the kind of craft
coming from American production lines. To a
nation, itself facing potential emergency, the test
must be as reassuring as it is to the British who
are staking so much on American "tools".
The test combat wfs carried out under con-
* .;"^..-wy . ..-ni -,.noQ 4-. .p a n an n i-s n r, a a -

~GO$
WASHINGTON - In the public
mind America's National Defense
Problem No. 1 is production of air-
planes. Actually, however, it isn't.
War Department chiefs haven't
been advertising it, but their great-
est worry is gunpowder. You can't
fight a war without powder. And upj
until recently the annual powder pro-'
duction of all U.S. factories was only
12,000,000 pounds, which would last
us a few short weeks in wartime.
In comparison, the United States
produced 500,000,000 pounds of pow-'
der at the end of the last war, and
had partially built factories which
would have produced another 500,-
000,000 pounds a few months after
the Armistice.;
BUT in 1919-20 these factories were
torn down or converted, by com-
panies worried lest the Government
get into munitions manufacture and
compete with their private business.
Twenty years have passed. Today,
with the country facing the most ur-
gent rearmament race in history,
private companies still are worried
over government operation - espe-
cially of nitrate plants.
It happens that nitrate is the key
to gunpowder production. Manufac-
ture of powder is a simple and speedy
process. But it is made from explo-
sive nitrate, and nitrate production
is far more difficult.
Source Of Nitrates
HERE are two kinds of nitrates,
natural and synthetic. Major source
of the natural is Chile. But it has
two big drawbacks: (1) the desperate
shipping shortage; (2) the product's
inferiority to synthetic nitrate for,
powder purposes, although good;
enough for fertilizer. Use of syn-;
thetic nitrate for explosives is far;
more efficient, less expensive and
militarily more desirable.
In the United States there are only
two big producers of synthetic explo-
sive nitrate - Allied Chemical and
Dye Corporation, at its giant Hope-
well, Va., plant; and duPont.
When Defense Commission chiefs
decided to build new powder plants,
they also had to provide an adequate;
supply of nitrate. And right there
they earl lead-on into a maze of
private opposition to their methods-
tacitly supported by certain Army
officers.
Today, one year later, the tangle
is not wholly resolved. The untold;

(Continued from Page 2)
examination will be held Tuesday,
,%,arch 4, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 1018
Angell Hall.
Concerts
Choral Union Concert: The Uni-
versity Musical Society will present
Nathan Milstein, violinist, Arthur
Balsam, accompanist, ,in the tenth
Choral Union concert Tuesday eve-
ning, March 4, at 8:30 o'clock, in
Hill Auditorium. Mr. Milstein will
appear instead of Georges Enesco,
who has been detained in Rumania
on account of the war.
Piano Concert: Maud Okkelberd,
Pianist, will present a recital as part
of the Faculty Concert Series at 4:15
p.m., Sunday, March 2. in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. The general
public is invited to attend.
Exhibitions
An exhibition of Currier and Ives
prints and of work by Yasuo Kuni-
yoshi is open afternoons from 2 to
5 in Alumni Memorial Hall, through
March 7.
.Lectures
University Lecturer The Honorable
Edwin Lowe Neville, recently Ameri-
can Minister to Thailand, will give
the following lectures under the au-
spices of the Political Science De-
partment at 4:15 p.m. on the days
named.
March 5: "Far Eastern Reactions
to Western Penetration." Rackham
Amphitheatre.a
Attention is called to the changes'
made in the schedule for Mr. Neville's
lectures as originally announced.
The public is cordially invited.
University Lecture: Colonel W. H.
Draper, of the Selective Service Head-
quarters, U.S.A., will lecture on the
subject, "The Selective Service Act
and the College Student" under the
auspices of the University Commit-
tee on Defense Issues on Thursday,
March 6, at 4:15 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. The public is
cordially invited.
University Lecture: Dr. C. N. H.
Long, Sterling Professor of Physiolo-
gical Chemistry, Yale University, will
give the following lectures under the
auspices of the Department of Bio-
logical Chemistry:
March 7: "Endocrines and the Con-
trol of Carbohydrate Metabolism."
4:15 p.m., Rackham Lecture Hall.
March 8: "Chemistry and Physi-
ology of the Adrenal Cortex." 11:00
a.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

ers of the club will meet in front
f the East Engineering Building at
:15 p.m. to arrange for transporta-
ion to the airport. Members plan-
ting to use the plane Sunday morn-
ag will be limited to one-half hour.
To reservations will be allowed on
he plane Sunday afternoon.
International Center: Sunday,
arch 2, Prof. Preston Slosson will
peak at 7:30 at the Center on the
"egular Sunday Evening Program,
ollowing the usual supper hour. Prof.
losson will discuss "Some Aspects
if the Present World Situation."
The Gamma Delta Student Club of
t. Paul Lutheran church, will have
,n outdoor steak roast on Sunday,
larch 2. The group will meet at
:30 p.m. at the church. All Lu-
heran students are invited.
The Bethlehem Student Guild will
lave supper at the Church Sunday
vening at 6:00. Afterwards there
vill be a Home Talent Musicale.
Lutheran Student Association: The
cappella choir will meet for re-
Learsal in the Zion Lutheran Parish
[all Sunday at 4:00 p.m.
There will be a regular meeting of
he association Sunday evening in
he Zion Parish Hall, beginning at
:30. Supper will be served, and
fterward Prof. P. E. Bursley will
peak to the group. All interested
,re invited,
Churches
Zion Lutheran Church will hold
egular services Sunday morning at
0:30. Rev. E. C. Stellhorn will deliver
e sermon on "The Priceless Value
f the Kingdom of God."
First Baptist Church: 10:30 a.m. A
nified service of worship and study.
ermon: "A Higher Law."
10:30 a.m. A special program of
!orship, study, and activity, for Kin-
rgarten and Primary children in
ieir respective rooms.
6:30 p.m. The High School Young
leople's Fellowship will meet in the
hiurch. Robert Streeter and George
!orcker will lead the discussion on
Personality."
7:00 p.m. The Roger Williams will
feet in the Guild House for a social
our.
8:00 p.m. Guild and Church will
nite in a Choral Communion Serv-
e in the church sanctuary.
Unitarian Church:11:00 a.m.
[orning Service: "In Time of War
repare for Peace," Charles Weller,
:ichigan Alumnus, and Head of
orld Fellowship Movement.
3:15 p.m. Rockwell Kent will speak
n the "Spanish Aftermath" as a
enefit for a Spanish Refugee Ship.
mall admission fee.
Reception will follow. Spanish Ex-
ibit will be on display.
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church:
unday, 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion;
:30 a.m. High School Class, Harris
fall; 11:00 a.m. Holy Communion
nd Sermon by the Rev. Henry Lewis;
1:00 a.m. Junior Church;11:00 a.m.
:indergarten, Harris Hall; 7:00 p.m.
haplain's Hour, Chapel, Harris Hall;
:30 p.m. College Work Program, Har-
is Hall. Speaker: Paul B. Cares of
Jlegheny College. Topic: "New Wine
n Old Bottles" or ("The Reformation
-a Revolution, Part II); 7:30 p.m.
horal Evensong in the church with
nusic by the Men and Boys Choir;
:15 p.m..Lecture on "The Episcopal
7hurch" by Rev. Henry Lewis (in the
hurch).
First Presbyterian Church: For the
First Sunday in Lent, Dr. W. P.
emon will speak on "Life Simpli-
ed" at the morning worship serv-
ice at 10:45 o'clock.
At the Westminster Guild on Sun-
lay evening, Palmer Christian will
give a program of music in the

church auditorium at 7 o'clock. A
cost supper precedes the meeting at
6 o'clock.
The Sunday Evening Club will meet
at 8 o'clock in the Lewis-Vance Par-
lors.
Disciples Guild (Christian Church)
10:00 a.m. Students' Bible Class, H.
L. Pickerill, leader.
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship, Rev.
Fred Cowin, Minister.
6:30 p.m. Disciples Guild Sunday
evening hour. Mr. Francis Ailen
will speak to a joint meeting of the
Guild and the Dunbar Center young
people's group on the topic "The
Effect of Interracial Groups in Con-
munity Life."
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Sunday morning services at 10:30.
Subject: "Christ Jesus." Sunday
School at 11:45 a.m.
First Congregational Church: 10:00
a.m. This marks the first of a sym-
posium to be held throughout Lent on
the topic, "Religion and Life." Prof.
Avard Fairbanks will talk on "Re-
ligion As Viewed by the Artist."
10:45 a.m. Services of Public Wor-
ship. Dr, L. A. Parr will preach on.
the first of his Lenten series of "Vi-
tal Questions," "Why Are We Here?"

story of the stalling of this vital de-! The public is cordially invited.
fense program is one of the most ex-
traordinary in the entire defensei

picture.
First Nitrate Hitch
FIRST HITCH was objection to the
Government's plan of importing
Chilean nitrate, thus permitting
Allied Chemical's Hopewell plant to
stop making fertilizer and devote its
entire capacity to explosive; nitrates,
if necessary.
The chemical industry fell on this
plan like a ton of brick. Backed by
certain Army officials, it hotly denied
that the nation faced a nitrate short-
age. Hopewell's full facilities, it was
argued would not be needed for pow-
der purposes.
The Defense Commission then
turned to developing new plant facil-
ities. Here good fortune seemedWto
smile. TVA still had its World War
nitrate plant at Muscle Shoals, was
eager to use it for defense produc-
tion.
But during long Senate debates in
the Coolidge an'd Hoover administra-
tions, which opposed government
production of nitrates, the machinery
had lain idle, and now needed mod-
ernization. Still that would take less
time than erecting a new plant, and
their were also the advantages of
strategic location plus excellent pow-
er and transportation facilities.

University Lecture: Dr. Edgar
Allen, Professor of Anatomy at Yale
University School of Medicine, will
lecture on the subject, "The Ovaries
and Their Hormones," under the
auspices of the Department of Ana-
tomy of the Medical School at 4:15
p.m. on Friday, March 14, in the
Rackham Lecture Hall. The lecture
is open to the public and members
of the Michigan Academy of Science
are especially invited.
Biological Chemistry Lecture: Dr.
J. L. Irvin of Wayne University will
lecture on "Bile and Bile Acids" in
the East Lecture Room of the Rack-
ham Building at 11:00 a.m. today. All
interested are invited.
Events Today
y1

I

International Center: Today at 3:00
p.m. the Political Round Table will
discuss "The Future of Freedom and
World Peace." Robert T. Nieset will
lead the discussion.
"Trelawney of the Wells," Arthur
"Wing Pinero's famous comedy of
theatre life in the last century, will
be performed again tonight in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre by Play
Production of the Department of
Speech. Reservations may be made
by phoning 6300.

Second Nitrate Hitch
WHEN the Defense Commission Coming Events
moved to use this government- I
owned plant, it again ran into power- Junior Research Club will meet on
ful opposition from big business, par- Tuesday, March 4, in the Amphithe-
ticularly from the duPonts, tacitly atre of the Horace H. Rackham
encouraged by the Army. However, School of Graduate Studies at 7:30
weeks later, the Defense Commission p.m.
finally had its way and the plan was Program: "Current Interests in Ar-
approved. Defeated, the duPonts did thritis Research" by R. H. Freyberg,I
the sporting thing and offered to sell Internal Medicine.
TVA latest types of oxidizers, thus "Cushions and Comfort" by W. E.
expediting renovation of the Muscle Lay, Mechanical Engineering Depart-
Shoals plant. ment.
TVA and Defense Commission-
heads were delighted. But their The Honorable Edwin L. Neville
pleasure - and duPont's willingness will talk with students interested in
-was short-lived. When it came to the foreign service as a career on
installing the machinery, duPont de- Monday and Tuesday, March 3 and
manded a guarantee that it would be 4, at 3:00 p.m. in room 1035 Angell
used only to produce explosive nitrate Hall.
and never fertilizer, in which duPont
is heavily interested. The Pre-Medical Society will meet

i
a
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T HIS was rejected flatly by TVA,
which pointed out that even if it
wanted to, it couldn't accept such a

Wednesday, March 5, at 8:00 p.m. at
the Michigan Union. Committees
will report on the extra activities
planned for this semester, and the

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