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May 23, 1941 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1941

_______

Band Finishes
Spring Concert
Arrangements
Program Will Be Devoted
Mainly To Wagnerian,
Contemporary Pieces
Program plans for the University of
Michigan Band's Spring Concert have
been completed, according to a report
from Stuart Park, '4 , business man-1
ager of the Band.
The concert, which is one of the
highlights of the Band's activities
during the year, will be offered at
8:30 p.m. Tuesday in Hill A(udi-
torium.
Wagnerian music will compose oneI
half of'the program while the second
half will be devoted to contemporary
pieces. Wagner's "Homage March,"
"Wotan's Farewell," and the Magic
Fire Music" from "Die Walkyries"
and two excerpts from "Lohengrin"
will make up the first part of the
program. The two excerpts will be
"Elsa's Procession to the Cathedral"
and the "Introduction to Act III."f
An intermission will precede the
six contemporary selections. The first
offering will be the "Finale from the
New World Symphony" by Dvorak,
followed by three marches, "American
Rhapsody" by Wood, "Cubana" by
Bennett, "The Deserted Ballroom" by
Gould and the "Polka and Fugue"
from "Schwanda the Bagpiper" by
Weinberger.
Lucille Bennett, violin soloist, will
play her father's composition as the
feature of the evening's entertain-
ment. -The three marches are "On
the Hudson" by Goldman, "The Sky-
liner" by Alford and "Semper Fi-
delis" by Sousa.
ASDL Hears
British Woman

AFL Workers Break Picket

Lines

These Volunteers To Aid
In Chinese TagD0yDrie
Studetntis Wll Canvass Campus Today
In Caim paign For Relief Funds
Students volunteering to sell tags at 7:45 a.m. today in the drive for
Chinese civilian relief funds are requested to report at the table in the cen-
ter of the diagonal at that time. In case of rain volunteers should report to
Room Four in University Hall. The first downtown shifts should report at
8:30 a.m. at the International Center in the South Wing of the Union.
All other shifts are requested to go to their posts promptly. They will
receive instruction sheets from the previous volunteer. No one should leave
his post untilrelieved. Extra volunteers who wish to help but have not yet
signed up may report any time during the day at the International Center.
Nichol's Arcade_

f Naval officers acted as observers as AFL metal trades unionists
disregarded AFL and CIO machinists' picket lines in the San Francisco
Bay area and returned to work in shipyards that had been closed for
12 days. Workers going back to jobs at the Moore Drydock Co., in
Oakland, Calif.. are in the background.
Government Units Share Cost,
Administration, Tharp Declares

Mrs.
Is

Fraser Asserts War
'People's Confliet'

Federal, state and local govern-
ments are heading toward a greater
sharing of cost and administration
of government functions, Claude R.
Tharp writes in the Bureau of Gov-
ernment publication, "Federal Ex-
penditures in Michigan," released
yesterday.
Mr. Tharp, a Research Associate
in the Bureau, points out that this
tendency is caused by new conditions
which have developed under the exist-
ing governmental structure. There
has been a widening of community
interest in certain functions which
formerly were only of local concern.
Ability Unequal
Financial ability among the states
and communities of the nation is
unequal, and many local units are
unable to support the expanding func-
tions of government. The Federal
government is also superior to the 10-
Library Head
(;en Honors
For Services

The English do not feel that the
present conflict belongs to any special
class or group, but, rather, that it
is a people's war, Mrs. Robert Fras-
er, former member of the London
County Council, declared last night
in an address sponsored by the Amer-
ican Student Defense League.
Mrs. Fraser arrived in this coun-
try from Australia two months ago,
having left England in June, 1940.
She plans to remain in Ann Arbor
for a few weeks during which time
she will deliver talks on "Britain
During the War" to interested groups.
Speaking yesterday in Helen New-
berry Dormitory, the English lady
asserted that "the chief feature of'
democracy in Great Britain today is
that it is unified and has been made
thus not by the decree of a dictator,
but by common feeling of the peo-
ple."
Any fraternities, cooperatives,
dormitories or other organization who
would like to hear Mrs. Fraser speak
are requested to call H. V. S. Og-
den, faculty advisor of the American
Student Defense -League.
Have You Any Clothes
For Britain? Call 5700
An appeal is being made for clothes
for British War Relief. All students
are urged to look over their clothes
and donate any that they are not
intending to take home.
If anyone has any clothes that he
will not be needing, he is urged to
contact Mrs. Clare Griffin, at 21
Ridgeway, phone number 5700, and
she will have them called for.
I The Latest Hits in

William Warner Bishop, Univer-
sity Librarian since 1915, was hon-
ored last night in a banquet at the
League attended by several promin-
ent librarians from the state and
nation.
Mr. Bishop gave a talk on "Libra-
ries In the Last Forty-five Years,"
in which he described the many ad-
vances which libraries have made
since 1895, when he began his dis-
tinguished career.
"At that time," he said, "there
were 4,026 libraries in the country,
2,100 of .which had less than 2,000
volumes."
The great strides which have been
made since then are shown in the
contrast of Michigan's 98,000 volumes
in 1895 to 10 times that figure at
the present time. There has also
come about since then, Bishop con-
tinued, a transfer of literature in all
subjects which has given us equal-
ity with the formerly supreme in-
tellectual centers and scholars of
Europe.
Dr. Alexander Ruthven accepted
on behalf of the University a por-
trait of the eminent librarian, paint-
ed by John Coppin of Detroit. The
presentation was made by Samuel W.
McAllister, associate librarian, speak-
ing for the library staff.
Prof. Cecil J. McHale of the li-
brary science department presented
a sum of money o be used for a lec-
tureship in honor of Mr. Bishop. The
mnoney was donated by alumni, and
former library students.
Mr. Bishop was greeted by Robert
M. Lester, secretary of the Carnegie
Foundation, who told of the great
services for which he was renowned
by librarians and educators through-
out the country.
All unsold tickets for the Stu-
dent Senate Scholarship Dance
should be turned in between 12:30
p.m. and 4:30 p.m. today to the
Dance Committee, Room 304,
Union.

cal governments in tax collection.
Outright transfer of certain services
to the Federal Government, however,
is prohibited by the Constitution.
The economic depression of the
thirties has also forced the sharing
of the fiscal burden. This was caused
by the decline of state and local rev-
enues and the increase in welfare
and relief activities which were fi-
nanced to a great extent by federal
funds.
Federal Funds
Federal assistance in financing
state and local activities was not
large before 1933, but in 1939 one-
third of government expenditures in
Michigan were financed by federal
funds. This assistance was either in
the form of grants-in-aid or direct
federal expenditures.
Grants-in-aid are those funds paid
to the state treasurer to be spent
by state and local government agen-
cies or to state institutions and units
of local government. Direct federal
expenditures are expenditures made
directly by the new federal agencies
created during the depression for re-
lief and recovery purposes.
Total federal grants and direct ex-
penditures in Michigan rose from
$176,000 in 1913 to $12,000,000 in 1933.
In 1934 they jumped sharply to
$97,000,000. An all-time peak of
$188,000,000 was reached in 1939.
Financial Aids
Objects of these financial aids by
the federal government have varied
greatly. In 1913 more than one-half
of federal contributions were spent
for public welfare with education
ranking second and conservation
third; 1918 saw the ratio about the
same, but in 1923 highways took first
place. Education remained second
while conservation shifted to third
and public welfare to fourth.
Highway expenditures ranked first
from 1934 to 1939 inclusive except
for 1934 and 1935 when public wel-
fare took precedence because of the
huge sums spent for unemployment
relief.
Make TelE
\r
your Summer
Headquarters

7:45 Marjorie Killins
9:00 Carolyn Byrne
10:00 Nancy Gray
11-12:15 Anita Alexander
12:15 Marjorie Kaufman
1:00 Frances Ferguson
2:00 Olga Gruhzit
3:00 Mary Mustard
4:00 Martha Crothers
Kresge's Corner
7:45 Virginia Johnson, Yue Ting
Fard
9:00 Eve Etkin, Yue Ting Fard
00:00 Ed Gambolini, Berle Mack
11-12:15 Janet Grace, Reva Frumkin
12:15 Virginia Apple
1:00 Jane Sapp, Margaret Weiner
2:00 Margaret MacCarthy
3:00 Sally Teeter, Syril Green
4:00 Jean Hubbard
Dental Building
7:45 Jean Kappen,
Jean Manwaring
9:00 Ruth Gram
10:00 Marlou Shartel
12:15 Irene De Sarno
1:00 Dotty Lindquist
2:00 Ginnie Smirl
3:00 Doris Ann Hendrick
4:00 Hazel Mullerj
Between N.S. & Chemistry Buildings
7:45 Phyllis Hamilton
9:00 Jean Gull
10:00 June Tolson
11-12:15 Bernice Jack
12:15 Opal Shimmon
1:00 Janet Sargent
200 Betty Jane Olsen
3:00 Marsha Kohl
Romance Languages
7:45 Dave Margold, Nishon
9:00 Jack Nakamura, Pusack
10:00 Geraldin O'Sullivan, Jenswold
11:00 Honning Wong, Mandeberg
12:15-1:00 Jerome Fleman, Keenan
1:00 Dan Levine, Behrman
2:00 Jack Shiraga, G. W. Sallade
3:00 Solomon Schneyer, Thatcher
4:00 Fritz Freelander
Haven Bench (between A.H.-H.H.)

12:15 A. Feldman
1:00 J. Browning
2:00 E. Gallo
3:00 R. Koch
Center Diagonal
7:45 John Rogers, Harry Morris,
Virginia Appleton, Higbie
John Fauver
9:00 Makepeace Tsao, George She-
pard, Patricia Young, Lafay-
ette Stuch
10:00 Richard Rawdon, Hennan
Chu, Ruth Duhlman, White
11:00 Richard Rawdon, C. W. Chen,
12:15 Jimmy Tong, George Green
12:15 Ed Weil, C. W. Chen, Sally
Walsh, Mary Starkan
1:00 John Hunter, Roland Foley,
Fay Goldner, Porter
2:00 John Hunter, Ed Goimgalini,
Helen Lakey, Wingate
3:00 John Hunter, Owne Eschen-
roder, Dorothy Twiner, Otto
4:00 Bob Schatt, Nancy Drew
Main Library
7:45 Cris Behr
9:00 Marty Poe
10:00 Nancy Upson'
11:00 Martha Cummins
12:15 Mary Starkan
1:00 Marge Rich
2:00 Connie Lorch
3:00 Beth Cowing
4:00 Joy Wright
Engineering Arch
7:45 Merritt Bigelow, Mary Lee
Wagner
9:00 Morrison, Betty Kynoch
10:00 Dave Streiffler,
Betty Jane Barnett
12:15 Dave Streiffler, Jean Johnson
1:00 Bud Brant, Gail Parsons
2:00 Bud Brant, Mary Ellen Alt
3:00 Bob Schwyn, Pat MacFarland
4:00 Jerry Lipinick, Nelda Cain
University High School And
Architecture
7:45 Robert Morrison
9:00 Fred Wolf
i0:00 Joe Silversmith
11:00 Herb Heavenrich
12:15 Robert Samuels
1:00 Jack Kessel
2:00 James Halzberg
3:00 Norman Schwartz-
Helen Bonnsack
Museum
7:45 T. G. Brown, Cilia Chao
9:00 Albert Ochs, Cilia Chao
10:00 Albert Oehs, Ruth Chou
11:00 Ken Bevis, Ruth Chiou
12:15 Jimmy Tong, Geourge Green
1:00 Commie Lovejoy,
Alberta Oehs
2:00 Walt Galson, Esther Tang
3:00 Szeto Cheuk,
Coucha Herrarte
4:00 Szeo Cheuk, Mary Auyang
Union
7:45 Marie Sinclair,
Betty Markward
I 9:00 Elizabeth Anderson,

Mary E. Brown
10:00 Jean Hedler, Barbara Burns
11:00 Phyllis Oetjen, Ling Chom
Chun, Jean Campbell
12:15 Phyllis Oetjen, Ling Chom
Chun. Sally Hunter
1:00 Glen Hedler,.Betty JaneOlson,
Mary Habel
2:00 Shirley Zheutlin,
Mary Pfender
3:00 Vera Stacy, Lois Dumond,
Dorothy Rybolt
4:00 Mary Black, Jean Forrest,
Elizabeth Buesser
Law Quad Entrance and Corner
Tappan and South U.
7:45 Doris Nasholt, Nestor Velasco
9:00 Judith Donnan, Carlos Mier
10:00 Page Bachelor, John Fung
11:00 Hilda Rothblatt, Gloria Mc-
Vittie, Vernon Lum
12:15 Hilda Rothblatt, Gloria Mc-
Vittie, Bernice Howell
1:00 Paul Vinelli
2:00 Louise Engell
3:00 Sally Lougheed, Jean Kerr
4:00 Jean Grant
Law Quad Center
7:45 Edith Stevenson
9:00 Marjorie Nield
10:00 June McKee
11:00 Mariett Rolleston
12:15 Ellen Fleischman
1:00 Gerry Hartman
2:00 Margaret Groefsema
3:00 Betty Kefgen
4:00 Peg Stroud
Main And Washington
8:30 Betty Erdman
1:00 Janet Leeven,
Dorothy Farnsworth
2:00 Peggy Polumbaum,
Gertrude Clubb
3:00 Ardos Rawlings,
Martha Speelor
4:00 Sally Blair, Bennie Galanasky
Main And Liberty
10:00 Harold Saeger
12:15 Chester Bradley
1:00 Harold Organic
2:00 Paul Banner
3:00 Leonard Tolmach
4:00 S. L. Yoh
Main And William
8:30 Chao Yun-tsung
10:00 Chao Yung-tsung
1:00 Hu Han Chuan
.2:00 Hu Han Chuan
3:00 Raymond Chen
4:00 Raymond Chen
Washington And Fourth

8:30
12:15
1:00
2:00
3X00
4:00
10:00
11:00
12:15
1:00
2:00
3:00
4:00

Len Blumberg
Art Papizian
Irving Zeitz
James Chapman
Coral DePrester ,
Art Rude '
Liberty And Fourth
Bob Speckhard
Daisto Luokkela
Erv Clahassey
Harold Osterweil
Bill Rockwell
Kuo-Hua Chao
Kuo-Hua Chao
Economy Baler Co.

; .:
i
'

Dean Edmonson Back
From Education Meet
Dean James B. Edmonson of the
education school returned yesterday
from a four-day meeting of the Ed-
ucational Policies Commission at Sky-
top, Pennsylvania.
"The Education of Free Men in
American Democracy," the Commis-
sion's latest report released last
week, was reviewed and plans were
made to stimulate wide reading and
discussion throughout the nation.
The book, an important new state-
ment of educational policy, is the re-
sult of contributions of some of the
leading educators in the country rep-
resenting the National Education
Association of the United States and
the American Association of School
Administrators.
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Dorothy Briddon
Helen Pielenmeier
Charlie Wienary
Gertrude Bert
Bert Ludy
Betty Walker
Ruth Fritz
Angell Hall Lobby
Len Zuckerman, Li Zen Jung
Mary Sellon, Kyan Sok Vung
Bill Stewart, Chou Wen Mei
Chou Wen Mei
Al Anderson, Cal Chamberlain
Tracy Freeman, Jimmy Wu
Beal Klingbil, Jimmy Wu
Clarence Carlson, Fred Chang
Clarence Carlson, Charles Lau
Alumni Hall
R. Maddock
I. Weiss
C. Boyd
Igor Plusc

11:30-1:15 Kenneth Lau,
Chou Chi Ngal
Hoover Ball Bearing
11:30-1:15 Fred Chang,
Bacon Yeung

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