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May 22, 1941 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-22

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 22, 1941

- -- ..- -

Burks, Kempf, Savage, Given
Graduate School Fellowships

Winners of three $2000 graduate
fellowships were announced by the
Executive Board of the Graduate
School yesterday.
The Alfred H. Lloyd award was
given to Arthur W. Burks, Grad., of
Ann Arbor, and the recipients of the
Horace H. Rackham Postadoctoral
Fellowships were Dr. Alice H. Kempf,
hygienic laboratory research assis-
tant, and Leonard J. Savage, Grad.,
of Ann Arbor.
Dr. Kemp, possessor of a PhD I
in the field of bacteriology, plans to
continue her work. in experimental
pneumonia in a search for an effective
serum therapy.
Burks, candidate for a doctors de-

gree in philosophy, plans to extend
his work on "The Logical Foundation
of the Philosophy of Charles Saun-
ders Peirce" by writing a book.
Savage will attend the Institute for
Advance Study at Princeton, New Jer-
sey, whose faculty includes Albert
Einstein, to advance work in the field
of mathematics. He will seek a doc-
toral thesis on "The Application of
Vectorial Methods to the Study of
Distance Spaces."
The Lloyd Fellowship was estab-
lished by the Board of Regents in rec-
ognition of the work of the late Alfred
H. Lloyd, formerly dean of the grad-
uate school, and is awarded to grad-
uate students presenting a well-or-
ganized research program.
Two postdoctoral fellowships were
made available in 1936 by the Board
of Governors of the Horace H. Rack-
ham Trust Fund for candidates hav-
ing shown high ability and interest
in research and presenting a well-
organized research program.!
Johnson Elected President
Walter K. Johnson, '42A, was elect-
ed President of the local student
chapter of the American Institute.
of Architects at a meeting held yes-
terday.

QUALITY
LIFE INSURANCE
AT LOW COST
Has been issued for 83 years by
THE NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY)
of Milwaukee, Wisconsin
A BILLION DOLLAR COMPANY
For Information, See or Call
Clinton E. Purdy'
206 Wolverine Bldg, Tel. 7333

Banquet Honors
BishopToday
Librarian Will Be Retired
After Long Service
In recognition of his 26 years of
service to the University, retiring
University Librarian William W.
Bishop will be honored at a banquet
at 7 p.m. today at the League.
With President Alexander G. Ruth-
ven presiding, Mr. Bishop will speak
on "Libraries in the Last 45 Years."
Prof. Cecil J. McHale of the li-
brary science department will pre-
sent a sum of money contributed by
alumni and former library students
to be used for a lectureship in honor
of Mr. Bishop.
Acting in the University's behalf,I
President Ruthven will accept a por-
trait of Mr. Bishop by John Cop-
pin of Detroit which is to be presented
by the library staff.
Mr. Bishop will be greeted by Ro-
bert M. Lester, secretary of the Car-
negie Corporation, Professor McHale
and Associate Librarian Samuel W.
McAllister.-f
Having served the University since
1915, Mr. Bishop will retire in July
at the age of 70. He graduated from
the University in 1892, received his
master's degree in 1893 and has re-
ceived several honorary degre from
other universities.
Guansing Arrives Today
For Student Conferences
Benjamin Guansing, acting secre-
tary of the Philippine Division of the
Committee on Friendly Relations
Among Foreign Students will arrive
in Ann Arbor today for conferences
with local Philippine students at the
International Center.
Mr. Guansing has organized the na-
tional conference of the Filipino Stu-
dents Christian Movement in Phil-
adelphia which will be held June 13
to 15. He will discuss plans for at-
tending the conference with the lo-
cal students.

Here Is
In

Today's
Summary

I I
Residents of Ann Arbor township
filed suit in the circuit court Sat-
urday asking for an injunction to
prevent the city from using its new
dump on the Mulreed farm, Dhu Var-
ren Road. The hearing was set for
Monday.
School district No. 5 also joined
in the petition, claiming that west
winds blow smoke of the dump fires
in the direction of the school building
and make it impossible to open win-
dows for proper ventilation.
Besides the fire and smoke annoy-
ance, residents say that the dump
has already caused an unsanitary
condition in the neighborhood, and
asked that the field be covered with
a "suitable" layer of dirt.
*
Orlando W. Stephenson, professor
of the teaching of history at the
University High School, was ap-
pointed by Mayor L. J. Young as
police commissioner of the city.
Common council passed the selec-
tion Monday at its meeting and also
arproved two other appointments
of the mayor.
Today Is Last Chance
To Buy Your Technic
Closing out publication for the year,
the final issue of the Michigan Tech-
nic wil be on sale for the last time
today.
Containing three feature articles,
"Riding Comfort" by Prof. Walter E.
Lay of the automotive engineering de-
partment, "Cellulose Acetate" by
Blaine B. Kuist, '41E, and "Motion
Study and Its Relation to Machine
Design" by Guy J. Bates, the issue
is the biggest since May, 1938, with
36 pages instead of the usual 28.
Graduating seniors may purchase
Technic subscriptions for next year
at this time, the editors announced.

9

Ann Arbor

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

THURSDAY, MAY 22, 1941
VOL. LI. No. 166
Publication In the Daly Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
membe of the University.
Notices
To the Members of the University
Senate: The second regular iheeting
of the University Senate will be held
on Monday, May 26, at 4:15 p.m.,
in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
Dental School Assembly: The final
student assembly of the year will be
held today at 4:15 p.m. in the Audi-
torium of the Kellogg Foundation In-
stitute. The speaker is Dr. B. Gott-
lieb and his subject is, "What Has
Research Contributed to Dentistry?
All students will be required to be
in attendance and should be in their
places by 4:10 p.m.
Florence E. Allen Scholarships for
Women at New York University
School of Law: Notice of the estab-
lishment of six full-tuition scholar-
ships of the New York University
School of Law for deserving women
graduates of accredited universities
and colleges has been received at the
President's Office and may be in-
spected there. These scholarships
are for women who desire to enter
the School of Law in September,
1941. Letters of application should
be sent to the Secretary of the Com-
mittee on the Florence E. Allen
Scholarships for Women, Miss Mar-
cia V. Maylott, New York University
School of Law, Washington Square,
New York City. They should be ac-
companied by an official transcript of
the applicant's college record, a re-
cent photograph of the applicant, at
least one letter of recommendation
from' an academic officer of the ap-
plicant's college, and two letters of
reference from persons other than
relatives of the applicant residing in
the applicant's home town. These
papers should be submitted by July
15, 1941,
Student Loans: All those wishing
to apply for a student loan for either
the summer session or the fall term
should file their applications in Room
2, University Hall, at once.
Office of the Dean of Students
All Students who expect to become
candidates for a Teacher's Certificate
in February, June, or August, 1942
should call at the office of the
'School of Education at this time for
an application blank for admission
to candidacy for the teacher's cer-
tificate, which is to be returned by
June first.
West Quadrangle and East Quad-
rangle Residents: Room assignments
for the year 1941-42 will be posted
on your House bulletin board at noon
today. Those who have reapplied
should look over the assignments
carefully and notify the Dean of Stu-
dents Office at once if any changes
are desired, as contracts will be sent
out in a few days.
Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid of Re-
search: Applications for grants may
be arranged for at the office of the
Secretary, F. L. Everett, 104 W. En-
gineering Building.
German Departmental Library: All
boks due Saturday, May 24.
Le Foyer Francais will again open

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News

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ORDER CAPS and
GOWNSatjjq~r
Ask about our ECONOMY RENTAL plan

its doors at 1414 Washtenaw during
the Summer-Session. Read on pages
113 and 114 of the Summer Session
Bulletin all the advantages Le Foyer
Francais offers this Summer.
For further information see Pro-
fessor Charles E. Koella, Room 412,
Romance Language Building, or ap-
ply directly to the Office of the Dean
of Women.
Summer Work-Sales: Men who
are interested in finding out more
about the sale of Fuller Brushes
should get in touch with Nick Chape-

"1

I

kis, Room 314 at the Union, Thurs-
day or Friday, from 5-6 o'clock, this
week.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information
(Continued on Page 4)
RUSH TEERAM AT
Teleqrapl
CHARGES FOR TELEGRAMS
PHONED IN APPEAR ON YOUR
(Cj TELEPHONE yBILL.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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U

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St., Phone 3916. 10c
MISCELLANEOUS
BEN THE TAILOR pays the best
price for used clothes. 122 E.
Washington. le
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. , 19c
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates. Weave-Bac
Shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run'
listings of your vacant houses in
The Daily. Dial 23-24-1 for spe-
cial rates. 353
TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
RHEAD'S HOUSEHOLD PACKING
CO.--Let us move, pack, or ship
you to any point. Experienced
movers. Special rates for students',
storage. Dial 3515. 318 N. First
St. 32c

VIOLA
typist,
public.

STEIN-Experienced legal
also mimeographing. Notary
Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
FOR RENT

ROOM and BOARD
ROOM OR BOARD for Summer
School. Theta Xi Fraternity, 1345
Washtenaw, located three blocks
from campus. Moderate prices.
Call 2-4489. 396
TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c

MARTIN PLACE-Very attractive
6-room unfurnished home. Rent
including heat and garage $75 per
month. Oril Ferguson, 928 Forest.
Phone 2-2839. 391
522 MONROE-Newly decorated 2-
room furnished apartment. Pri-
vate bath. Electric refrigeration.
$40. Adults. Phone 5224 or 2-2839.
390
WANTED TO BUY-4
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 31c
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR SUITS, OVERCOATS.
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
SIANS, MINKS. PHONE ANN AR-
BOR 6304 for APPOINTMENTS.
SAM.

MICHIGAN
Air Conditioned
NOW!
to t .y
1n9 t io a ae
d e°at e
tit tioet
Es ''BA
1e e
de9 \.. S
Mustasummersr
\a\.
be a country cousin ?5
ARROW says"N!t
..and proves it
with city bred summer-
shirts that are comnfort-
ably cool, yet as neat
and smart as any yout
own.
Arrow shirts have the
famous Arrow collar to
take you handsomely
a t through the hottest days.
A>hrThey have the renowned
"Mitoga" athletic fit.
They are Sanforized
Shrunk (fabric shrinkage
less than 1%). In meshes,
voiles, batistes $2 up.
Arrow summer ties $1 to
: $1.50. Yours for a better
cooling system. See your
' ' Arrow dealer today.
7/1110//FSHIRTS

COLLARS . . . TIES . . . HANDKERCHIEFS .. UNDERWEAR
~S

I

WEEK DAY SHOWINGS at 2-4-7-9 P.M.
STARTING TODAY!

,-;

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!
,
4.-
Y,
i
:;;-;.
w

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1 mi/lion reasons why
this shirt's cool

I

T HERE are a million or
so holes in the fabric of
Arrow's new mesh shirts.
You can't see them - but
you can feel the cooling
way they let air in, and
heat out. Many smart pat-
terns to pick from. Sanfor-
ized-Shrunk, fabric shrink-
age less than 1%! (Get sonmc
today and get cool! $2, pup
Harmonizing Arrow
Summer Ties .
$1 and $1.50

11

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