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May 18, 1941 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, MAY 18, 1941

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE, FIVE

THE MICHIGAN DAILYPAGE FIVE

Annua Lantern Night Sing To Be Held Tomorrow

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Senior Women
To Be Honored
At WAA Event
Traditional 'M' To Be Formed;
Song Program Is Arranged
By Sororities And Dormitories
Final tune-up notes before the tra-
ditional Lantern Night Sing, spon-
sored by WAA, to be held at 7 p.m.
tomorrow at Palmer Field, have been
announced, by Virginia Frey, '42E, in
charge of the line of march.
All senior women are to wear caps
and gowns and form a double line
after receiving their lanterns at the
side of the library-the entrance to
the basement study hall. Lanterns
will be distributed at 7 p.m.
To Wear Ribbons
Underclassmen instructions are the
juniors shall wear yellow hair bows,
sophomore women, red and freshman,
green. All are to line up in single
file on both sides of the double senior
line.,
Everyone is to be in line by 7:10
p.m. promptly, announced Miss Frey,
as the band will come at 7:15 p.m. At
that time the march will begin, led
by the band and the five past presi-
dents of the major organizations on
campus; namely, 'Patricia Walpole,
'41, of Assembly; Annabel Van Win-
kle, '41, of Panhellenic, Jane Grove,
'41, of WAA; Doris Merler, '41, of
Judiciary Council, and Virginia Lee
Hardy, '41, of the League. ,
To Form Block 'M'
The march will proceed to Palmer
Field where the traditional block
"M" will be formed. Seniors will
then pass their lanterns to the under-
classmen, and the first stanza of the
"Yellow and the Blue" will be sung.
Immediately after completion of the
song, lanterns are to be taken to the
white house on Palmer Field. The
Sing will immediately follow this.
Order of singing will be as fol-
lows: Delta Delta Delta, Couzens Ha,
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Zeta Tau Al-
pha, Alpha Phi, Gamma Phi Beta,
Delta Gamma, Alpha Chi Omega,
Alpha Xi Delta and Collegiate Sor-
osis.
Order Of Singing
Jordan Hall, Stockwell Hall, Mosh-
er Hall, Phi Sigma Sigma, Alpha
Gamma Delta, Adelia Cheever, Mar-
tha Cook, Alpha Delta Pi, Chi Ome-
ga Betsy Barbour, Kappa Alpha The-
ta, Pi Beta Phi, Alpha Omicron P
and Kappa Delta.
In case of rain; all groups are to
meet at 7:30 p.m. inside Waterma I
Gymnasium where the sing will take
place as scheduled.
To Hold Open House
Alpha Epsilon Phi will hold open
house from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. today.
WAA SCHEDULE
Softball schedule: At 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday Alpha Gamma Delta vs.
Gamma Phi Beta; Kappa Delta
vs. Betsy Barbour; Jordan III vs.
Alpha Epsilon Phi; Alpha Omi-
cron Pi vs. Pi Beta Phi. At 5:10
p.m. Newberry vs. Alpha Phi and
Alpha Chi Omega 'vs. Kappa Al-
pha Theta. At 5:10 p.m. Wednes-
day, League House vs. Betsy Bar-
bour-Kappa Delta winner. Thurs-
day's games will be announced in
Wednesday's schedule.
Tennis: Club meets at 4:15 p.m.
Monday. All interested are asked
to come. Matches between upper-
classmen and freshmen will be
played. All participants in tour-
naments are urged to play off
their matches.
Golf: Interstate tournament

will be held Saturday at the Uni-
versity Golf Course. Michigan
plays Michigan State and Ohio
State.
Archery: Because of inclement
weather, the all-campus tourna-
ment will be continued all week.
Entrants are asked to get in touch
with Eleanor Gray, 9085. Meeting
is at 4:15 p.m. Thursday.
Dance: Club meets 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Barbour Gymnasi-
um.
Outdoor Sports: Meeting at
4:30 p.m. Thursday at WAB. A
three-day Hostel trip will be held
Friday through Sunday.

Ready To Set Sail

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Music Students'
Will Premier
Compositions
Vocalists And InstrUmentalists
To Participate With Orchestra
In First Concert Of Its Kind
From solo singer to dance orches-
tra will be the all inclusive scope of
a concert of first performances to be
held at 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, in the
Hill Auditorium, and will be free of
charge to the public.
For the first time in the history of
the . School of Music, students will
have the opportunity to present their
own compositions before the general
public for approval.
1941 Compositions
All original compositions to be used
on the program are written by stu-
dents in the composition class under
Prof. Percival Price, composer and
University carillonneur, who is in
charge of the concert of first per-
formances.
These 1941 contemporary composi-
tions display a wide variety of styles,
many different musical idioms and a
distinct tendency toward modernism.
Among the selections chosen for pre-
sentation are those composed for solo
singing, woodwinds, strings, brass,
choral combinations, organ, piano,
modern dance and !dance, orchestra.
Dance Band To Play
For the first time, a popular dance
orchestra will place themselves on.
the stage of the Hill Auditorium andj
will take an active part in the con-
cert music which is of a specific con-
tribution to American music.
The object of this premier of first
performances is to give the public
opportunity to hear what Professor
Price's composition class is doing and
to find out for themselves what talent
there is among the young student
composers who spend most of their'
time in practice studios and most of
their energy on manuscript paper.
Of Public Interest
"The public should find real inter-
est in this unique program, as it con-
tains work worthy of presentation,"
Professor Price said.
Student composers whose original
music is to be presented for the first
time are: William Barnard, SMGrad,
who will play an organ composition;
Aarne Koljonen, '41SM, who will di-
rect the Lutheran Student Mixed and
the Lutheran Male choirs in two
songs.
Student Composers
William Schottsteaedt, '41, will play

Oshtih Tact6 Q m
I've been looking through last
week's issues of the Michigan State
News, the college paper published at
East Lansing. It was named, among
the "pacemakers" in college journal-
ism recently, so I suppose it's a pretty
good paper.
I took a look at the edit page for
Saturday, May 10. There were four
editorials. The first one stated that
as midterms are over, it might be wise
to give a thought to mother on Her
Day. The second told about, an
award given to Genet Autry andshis
horse, Champion. The third said
that students should keep up with
the times and get hitch-hikers cards.
And the final one-something to give
Depth to the page-told about two
ways you can make women blush.
You'd think there wasn't a thing of
importance happening in the world,
the way the editorial writers of the
News go blithely on their way. Os-
trich tactics, I'd call it.
'Packing' Opposed
You might even think the News,
acting in the Best Interests of the
College, had its financial eye on the
state legislature. You might. I Mite.
Anyhow, if the Board packing
scheme went through here, that's
probably what our editorial page
would degenerate to. I can see four
inches of type on "Spring Comes to
Ann Arbor" and "What Are You Go-
ing to do About it." Or maybe a big,
big spread on the Keep-Off-the-
Grass campaign.' But as far as any
real, live, independent thinking goes,
it will be confined to the editorial
sanctum. Or maybe not even there,
if the boys get out of practice.
Mite Urges Protest
It's so typical of University apathy
that The Daily should have to assume
his suite for the piano; Harry Geiger,
SMGrad, will direct the University
woodwind quintet in his own com-
position for woodwinds, and Jack Os-
sewaarde, SMGrad, will direct the
First Baptist Church Choir in two
songs.
Jacob Evans, Grad, will direct his
quartet for strings in atonal style;
Ruth Holden Lahee, SMGrad, will
present a song and two dances, the
latter to be done by Shirley Risburg,
'42Ed., and Evelyn Spamer, '42Ed.
Bill Sawyer, SMGrad, will direct the
Michigan Union orchestra in his own
suite for American Dance Orches-
tra.

7he Ilite W./ite4

all the leadership in opposing this
proposed "reorganization," It's not
the 50 or so students who work on
The Daily that are going to be affect-
ed most vitally. What it really means
is the loss of a free, independent
means of opinion and communication
for the whole student body. This is
YOUR newspaper, you know. Did you
ever think about that?
Tournament
Will Continue
Through Week
The 12th Intercollegiate Telegraph-f
ic Archery Tournament will be held
tomorrow through Saturday, May 14,1
at Palmer Field, Eleanor Gray, '43,;
archery manager, has announced.
The event to be shot is tiie Colum-
bia round which consists of 24 arrows
at each of the distances, of 50, 40,
and 30 yards. This is one of the of-
ficial National Archery Association
rounds for women.
Supervised shooting will take place
from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through
Thursday, from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Fri-
day and from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Satur-
day. All entrants must shoot with a
supervisor present. Targets will be set
up at 9 a.m. each morning and there
will be practice shooting tomorrow
through Thursday except from 3:20
p.m. to 4:20 p.m. on those days.
Any entrant unable to 'shoot dir-
ing the hours of supervised shoot-
ing is asked to call Eleanor Gray, at
9085 or David Conger, '41, at 23394
to make special arrangements.
Mothers To Be Feted
Women of the Alpha Phi house will
celebrate Mother's Day today-a
postponement due totheirspring
formal which was held last Saturday.
A luncheon for visiting mothers was
given yesterday after which the
guests were taken to the Crop and
Saddle Horse Show. A picnic sup-
per at the home of Mrs. Charles
Noble and a tea given by Alpha Phi
alumnae at .the home of Mrs. D. C.
May were also included in the week-
end program.

Huge Crowds
Attend Spring
Horse Show
Mary Hayden, Betty Bundt,
Nancy Furstenberg, Williams
Win First Place Riding Honors
A crowd of 350 people, both stanc
ing and in cars, lined the sides of the
corral as horsemen and horsewomen
rode their way into distinction at
Crop and Saddle's Horse Show held
yesterday afternoon.I
In the class limited to members of
Crop and Saddle, University women's
riding club, Mary Hayden, '42, presi-
dent, rode off with first place honors.
Dorothy Lindquist, '42, received the
second place ribbon and Yvonne
Westrate, '41, third place.
Others Win Honors
In the class limited to members of
Boot and Spur, University men's rid-
ing club, Bob Sykes, '44, 'walked off
with first place, John Stephens, '41,
with second place and Bob Emmett,
SpecE, with third place.
Both riding clubs combined in
order to put on the pair class which
put Miss Hayden and Stephens in the
limelight as winners, with Anita Alex-
ander, '44, and Sykes taking second
place and Miss Lindquist and Bob
Stuart, '41L, taking third place
honors.
Win Group Awards
Nancy Furstenberg jumped her way
into first place glory in the open
jumping class while Miss Westrate
took second and Miss Alexander
third.
Betty Bundt, '44A, Jane Pritchard.
'44, and Janet Hiatt, '42, received
first, second and third place honors
in the University women's open while
the University men's open went to
Bill Williams, '43E, Charles Mohler,
'42F&C, and Clifford Jack Reynolds,
'43E, in that order.
Exhibition Events
Military precision drill performed
by members of Crop and Saddle and
spectacular exhibition jumping by
Miss Alexander and Mrs. John Alex-
ander highlighted the show. Another
exhibition event was the showing of
"Silver Chieftain," dappled grey
stallion belonging to Mrs. James
Gardner. Mr. James Gardner acted
as ringmaster for the show.

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LOOK{RG
CLflSS
\
4"
JUNE MEANS wedding bells,
flowers, and brides. If you are
planning to, say, "I do",_ this
June, you'll find the correct
veil and head dresses in har-
monious colors for the bridal
party at the HELEN POLHE-
MUS SHOP at the corner of
State and Williams,
A SHOWER FOR THE BRIDE
always brings up the problem
of gifts. THE GAGE LINEN
SHOP has a grand variety of
gifts. that any bride-to-be
would love to own. There are
luncheon sets, bath towels, Iin-
nguest towels, pillow cases,
and many other attractive ar-
ticles.
WHEN YOU ARE PASSING
THROUGH THE ARCADE be
sure and stop in at the VAN
BUREN SHOP to see their good
looking. sport things. The new
cyclottes are perfect for bi-
cycling as well as other sports.
These come in cotton crepe.
The shop also carries-crisp cot-
ton wash dresses, slacks, shirts
and jerkins--in bright spring

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Popular sailor trends will be
storming many a wardrobe this
summer and here's an example of
the road sailor influence is taking.
Done in light-colored, summer
weight materials, the navy middy
tie beautifully sets off the clever
collar.
It's sporty and yet when dressed
up with a classy hat, purse, gloves
and shoes, the outfit is already to
be worn to any ritzy place or any
fancy party.
GOLFERS PLEASE NOTE
Tomorrow is the last day that
golf scores may be turned in to
Mrs. Hanley at Barbour Gymnasi-
um if women golfers intend to try
out for places on the golf team.
The new team will be announced
Tuesday.

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CALKINS-FLETCHE
another special offerf
this week. For a limite
you can get a $2.00 jar
'bara Gould cleansing cr
$1.00. You should takes
age of this exceptional
tunity to get -this fine
sing cream at half pric

1Joyjce
CALL FOR NIA

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PRINTS
PASTELS
WHITES

Cas
take
stri
gay
Ch4
}ir f.: J %;":: .anc
r ' out
1 17/11

sual shoe favorites that
e campus miles in their
ide . . . and give you
y good looks, to boot.
ose them in duckskin
d famous palamino
thers. Colors straight
of the golden West.

WAMPUM-White or na-
tural palamino leather
studded with fake Jew-
els. Matching bag, 3.95.
5.95

INDIAN JEWELRY PO
MER--at the EIBLER J
RY SHOP! We found
derful collection of han
Indian bracelets, ring
brooches. They are
wrought silver or silve
turquoise stones. You ca
this strikingly different
ry at a price convenient
... $1.00 and up.
YOU JUST CAN'T HAV
MANY SMARTLY T
ED WASHABLES. For
wear they are cool an
fortable with sweaters
LON'S has a new gi
Craigs English casuals
piece seersucker suits,
skins, chambrays i
colors, stripes, or plaids.
den dress with bonnet to
is something different in
ed chintz.

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for you
ed time
of Bar-
eam for
advant-
oppor-
clean-
ce.
R SUM- 7
fEWEL-
a won-
d made
;s, and
plain
er with ,
an have
t jewel-
t to you
,y
0
0
7E TOO
AILOR-
school
d com-
s. DIL-
roup of
. Two-C0
shark-
in solid
A gar-
o match
n print-
j
f0
j/

5DAY
UNDERARM PADS
550
Whisk one of these lo-
tionized pads over your
underarms, and perspi-
ration as well as odor
appear to vanish for
one..two..three..four
.five days, depending
uon how "perspire-y"

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MEXI-COOL-EE - Pala-
'_mino leather in white,
natural or a patriotic
:,>..red, white and blue com-
"r...:::. bination.
.95
PIN TO - Summer-cool
duckskin in blue jean,
°y Indian orange, hayseed,
white. Matching bag,
2.95.
3.95
In natural or white
leather, 5.95.
HARLEQUIN - Multi-color
Rodeo stripe duc/kskin
with hayseed; or plain
colors: blue smoke with
red, white with navy,
hayseed with brown.

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