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May 11, 1941 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT
Enrollment In c
Not Affected B
1y BARBARA JENSWOLD
"While the enrollment of the Ger-
man department has fallen off about
five per cent this year as compared
to last, and one to two per cent be-
yond the expected decrease for the
second semester, these figures can
hardly be taken as indicative of an at-
titude engendered by the war situa-
tion," declared Prof. Henry W. Nord-.
meyer, chairman of the German de-
partment, in an interview recently
granted.
"For five or six years back," he*
added, "the enrollment has been hov-
ering about 1100 for the first semester
and 900 for the second, and this
year the department actually had
a three per cent increase in the fresh-
man class.
He conceded, however, that there is
a downward tendency shown for ex-
ample in the fact that the number of
students concentrating in German
in the last few years-has been reduced
from about twenty to eleven.
Professor Nordmeyer claimed that
this situation has come about chiefly
as a result of the gradual crowding
out of the high school curriculum
of all foreign languages in favor of
social studies and vocational subjects.
As a consequence, he said, there is'
a smaller demand for teachers of

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1941

Erman Classes Hothers' Day
y War Situation Will Be TopiC
Of Sermons
German in the secondary schools, and
the students now concentrating in
German are mainly those who study Since today is Mothers' Day, many
German for cultural reasons. i of the Ann Arbor churches are pre-
Though refusing to indulge in senting sermons in appreciation of
"wishful thinking," Professor Nord- motherliness and the importance of
meyer said that the demand for family life.
German in the colleges might even Dr. Brashares of the First Metho-
rise if this country is to profit from dist Church will preach on "A Family
the scientific and technical work of Centered Church," and Dr. W. P.
the Germans as reported in their Lemon of the First Presbyterian
books and other publications. He re- Church will present a sermon, ,'The
called how in the first World War Family Portrait."
he helped a friend in industry inter- Rev. C. H. Loucks of the First
pret German chemical patents that Baptist Church will give a sermon
had become valuable. "In Praise of Motherliness," and there
To illustrate the cultural value of is to be a special Worship Service
German even in times of stress and j led by Marian Rickert. In the evening
strain, Professor 'Nordmeyer drew at- the Roger Williams Guild will -hear
tention to a pronouncement made by Prof. George Carrothers speak on
President Roosevelt on March 17 "Choosing One's Religious Expres-
"To accept, today, the work of Ger-sion." This is the third in a series
man painters such as Holbein and of sx talks on crucial student choices.
Durer and of Italians like Botticelli The Disciples Guild, student organi-
and Raphael, and of painters of the zation of the Christian Church, is
low countries like Van Dyck and Rem- planning a trip to the Saline Valley
brandt, and of famous French, fam- Farm this evening. It will consist4
ous Spaniards . . . is to assert the mainly of a tour of the Farm and
belief of the people of this nation a picnic supper, followed by vesperI
in a human spirit which now is every- services. The Congregational Guild
where endangered. It is in this spirit, will join the group, and nioving pic-!
Professor Nordmeyer concluded, that tures of the Farm life will be shown
the German department conducts its later.
work. An installation banquet was giv-
en last week to honor lew officers
of the Disciples Guild. James Hall,
'42E, is the new president, Catherine
if17 L t~1 Tz Call, '43, is new vice-president, and
Merle Couch, '44, is new secretary-
treasurer. New committee chairmen
were also installed, and these in-
clude: Bryant Dunshee, '42, program
LOST and FOUND committee; Ruth :llen Thomas, '43,
LOST-Brilliant bracelet at Billiproject committee; David Tyner, '44,
AuditoriumWednesday. Reward, worship committee; Ralph De Blois,I
Michigan Union. Room 452. a44, publicity committee; and Roberta{
Holland, '43, social committee.
TYPING1
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen, A nn, A rbor
408 S. Fifth Ave, Phone 2-2935 or

Lord Halifax

4

CLASSIFIED
.. ..I- - - - -

Lord I alitax, British ambassa-
dor to the United States, said in an
address in Chicago that Germany's
domination of 164,000,000 people
"carries within it the seeds of its
own destruction." The ambassador
is on a seven-day tour of the mid-
west.
Gillett Songs
Are Played
A -t Festival
By RUTH GLASER
It was Friday afternoon at the
May Festival with her seven year
old grandson beside her that great
triumph finally came to Mrs. M.
Eleanor Gillett, whose charming lyrics

Control Board
Will Nominate
Nine Members
A nine-man nominating committee
- composed of the retiring editors
and business managers of The Daily,
'Ensian and Gargoyle and the three
student members of the publications
board will meet at 5:30 p.m. todayj
in the Student Publications Buildingr
to nominate nine students for the po-
sitions on the next year's Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Three will be chosen in a generalI
campus election to be held within
10 days, an election at which the stu-
dent member of the Board in Control
of Physical Education and the 6
class vice-presidents of the Union
will also be chosen.
Any student interested in having
his name placed with the nominations (
committee must present a petitiont
accompanied by 100 signatures to they
Men's Judiciary Council before theb
meeting.
The positions on the publications
board and the Union are one year
terms, while the Physical Education
job is of two year's duration.
Comprising the nominations com-
mittee are Hervie Haufler and Irv-
ing Guttman of The Daily; Bernard
Bloom and David Donaldson of the
Gargoyle, Jack Cory and Charles
Samuel of the 'Ensian, all seniors,
and the three present student mpm-
bers of the Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications, Philip Westbrook,
'43E, James Tobin, '41, and Albert
P. Mayio, of Detroit.
Citing the present faculty-staff
rift on the Publications Board, West-
brook requested that only those stu-
dents who are sincerely interested in
the student publications submit pe-
titions for the positions.
Unitarian Group
Will Hold Forum'
The second of the sixth annual
series of May Forums will be pre-
sented at 11 o'clock this morning at
the Unitarian Church. This meet-
ing will be a youth forum on the
topic, "What Is Worth Fighting
For?" and Prof. Antoine Jobin will
be chairman.
Speakers on the youth panel are
Charles Koethen for the Conscien-
tious Objector, Charles Karpinski,
'42, for the defeat of Nazism, Robert
Speckhard, '42, for democracy at
home, and George Mutnick, '44L, for
Sa socialist world economy.
The third and last of these forums,
designed to supplant the usual
church service, will be next Sunday,
w hen Prof. William Haber will speak
on the consequences of war upon
-populations.

After Finals

Student Deferment Requests
Must Be Filed Before June 1
Editor's Note: This is ,the fourth of request for deferment must be in-
a series, written in collaboration with 'ated by yourself. And it must be
Prof. Louis' A. Hopkins, chairman of tebyousl.Adimste
the University National Defense Co- done immediately The longer yo
mittee. wait the less are your chances of
obtaining an . agreeable answer
By HOMER SWANDER from your draft board.
If you want to be deferred after When the reclassifications, are
June 1 now is the time to file that made in June you will automatically
request with your local draft board. be placed in 1-A if you have request-
The present classification of 1-D ed nothing different. By that time
(general student deferment) will it is almost too late. Even if you
come to an end the first day of finally realize that you would like to
June. On that day all students are return to school in the fall and that
to be reclassified. Whether you are you might come under the "neces-
placed in class 1-A (subject to call sary in training" definition, you will
for active duty) or in 2-A (occu- have a difficult time convincing your
pational deferment) depends to a draft board to reclassify you a sec-
great extent on your own efforts. ond time.
Whether or not you want defer-
After the above-mentioned date ment, of, course, is entirely up to
only those students who are being you. However, the government
trained in courses considered neces- wants you where you will do the
sary to national defense will be able country the most good, and if that
to receive deferment. All others will is in school they will let you stay
be classified as 1-A. there. But you must act quickly
However, even if you are in one or you'll be in the Army before
of these "vital fields of study" the you know it.

i

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STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
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WANTED TO BUY-4
WHITE FORMAL or semi-formal
coat. Size 38-40. Write box 21,
Michigan Daily. 374
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 31c
WANTED -- ANY OLD OR NEW
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR. SUITS, OVERCOATS.
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
SIANS, MINKS. PHONE ANN AR-
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SAM.
FOR RENT
ROOMS to rent for fall and sum-
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371
SUM\¢ER SESSION STUDENTS-
Large, comfortable rooms, two
blocks from campus, reasonable.
Call 4850 or inquire 806 Hill.
ATTRACTIVELY FURNISHED two-
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TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
Mr)VING - STORAGE - PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
SITUATIONS WANTED -2
SITUATION WANTED-Experienced
couple for fraternity cook and por-
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Phone 6764. 350
EXPERIENCED COOK with good
references would like position in
fraternity for fall. Write Box No.
I-, Michigan Daily.

2-1416. 24C
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also\ mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
FOR SALE
THOROUGHBRED English Setter!
puppies, registered. Good hunting
strain. 3005 Plymouth Road. Ph.
5132. 366
TAILORING & PRESSING -121
STOCKWELL residents - Skilled al-
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across the street. Phone 2-2678.
A. Graves. 28c~
MISCELLANEOUS
PAINTING, Decorating, Paper Hang-
er. Blending and stippling. Work
samples shown. Phone 2-2943. 363
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.

were sung by the Youth Chorus
here Is Today's News under the direction of Juva Higbee
These songs are about memories
In Summary of her childhood, the Jack-in-the-
Pulpits, the crocuses she picked over
Working while oif duty for the past fences on her way toschool; crickets,
year, officers of the Ann Arbor Po- rain on the roof, the whistle of the
lice Department, aided by county popcorn man coming down the street.
prisoners, will complete their new They were written over twenty-two
pistol range within a few weeks. years ago for her grandchildren who
The officers had a $600 appropri- had to be "forced" to listen to them.
ation from the Common Council and Ida Tarbell, on hearing the lyrics
land donated by the water depart- of these songs. was so delighted that
ment for a starter, and several hun- she acted as Mrs. Gillett's sponsor
dred dollars worth of materials were at the Pen and Brush Club of New
contributed by local merchants. York. She has played and recited
Located on thesouth side of the these songs from here to Honolulu,
Huron River, a mile and a half west and it was Daniel Frohman, the great
of Whitmore Lake Road, the range Brcadway impresario, who suggested
is expected to be the finest in the that she call her :ecitals musical
state, exceeding several whose costs readings.
have run to $10,000 or $15,000. Hwevr s first relre-

oq Home by Boat
0 Transportation daily front Detroit to Cleveland and
Buffalo.
* We arrange for trunks and through Transportation.
* See your house manager for tickets.
Obtained at GOODHEW FLORAL CO.
on State Street next to Slater's
Call 7253 for further Details 7-10 P.M.
L.AnELINES
White and Miller, Campus Representatives

B

o -nition and she is o-rateful that it
Iritish Professor came to her when she could still ap-
preciate it. Glenn D. McGeoch, an
To Lecture Here assistant professor of the History of
sMusic felt for a good many years that
Speaking on 'Literature and Society; Mrs. Gillett's songs should have a
Eighteenth Century England," Prof. wider audience
B. Mowat of the University of
ristol, England, will deliver a Uni-
rsity Lecture at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday,
av 20. in the RackhamLfre Rall. I -T T 11,A gT

P

"

"""

Killins Gravel Company, phone in
7112. 5c R
WISE Real Estate . Dealers: Run Br
listings of your vacant houses in v
.,,, _M;

The Daily. Dial 23-24-1 for spe-
c:.ial rates. 353 Professor Mowat in traveling in this
country under the sponsorship of the
ANTIQUE EXHIBIT AND SALE: Carnegie Endowment for Interna-
Sponsored by Ann Arbor Antique tional Peace. He has spoken at sev-
Dealers Assoc., Masonic Temple, eral American universities. Professor
327 S. Fourth, May 14, 15, 16; 10 Mowat's special field is the diplo-
a.m.-10 p.m. Admission 25c. 375 matic history of modern times.

Relive the 6njoyment
YOU DERI VED FPR OM
THE MAY FESTIVAL

MJINIJAT
SUPPER
c'lay 11, 1941
t oase C'd Ch(;/se-Canadian Bacon
Sandwic-1h
Frs i ncS! liit'i]fle Sundnaeor
An, el Food Cake
Beuerage
50c
Pecan Waffle ivith Maple Syrup
Grilled Cris h tBacon
Pep permnin /Candy Ice Crean
or Orange Chiffon Pie
Bevuerag
5,c

/

11'

UL

"YOU CAN'T LOSE" .
already read about the National

If you haven't

Creared Tuna
and Miushrooin Pat/ie
French Fried Potatoes
Fresh Peas
Angel 1-ood Cakie
or Strawberry Sundae
B(, vera{ c
flO

Hear Your Favorite Artists
OF T HE MAY FESTIlVAL ,... ON
VICTOR RECORUS
- TI] H PH1ILA DELPH IA ORC H ESTRA.
* LAW/RENC E TIBBETT
- EUGENE ORMANDY
* JOSE ITURBI
- JASCIA IIEIFETZ
- DOROTHY MAYNOR
* GREGOR PIATIGORSIKY
C~olmein and listen to their master ful music in Victor
Records . : . enjoy them in your own home anytime.
PROMPT, PI-LASN( RECORD SERvIC(;

Palm Beach Suit Contest
in the magazines, we'll gladly tell you all about
it - and supply your Entry Blank - today. Win-
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FIRST PRIZE $1000
Take a few minutes today to learn about the many
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(;hic en (;Gumibo Soup
Baked !asm, Raisin Sauce
New Potatoes Parsley
F'resh Asparagus
Strawberry Shortcake or
Orange Chiffon Pie
Betverage
75c
GOOD FOOD
Excellent Service
6 to 7:30 o'clock
MAIN

I Ueci, IForinals $20

I

.IEGEI;S

Q

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