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May 10, 1941 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN BAILY **"""^

^, MAY 1"

esentations

It's

All True--What They Maintain

Ann Arbor

Alumni Clubs Sponsor Awards
sN

'Will Highlight i
Hillel Banquet'
Service Cup, Scholarships
Are To Be Awarded;.
Dean LloydTo Speak
Presentation of the coveted fra-
ternity-sorority Service Cup will
highlight the annual Hillel Banquet
which will be held in conjunction with
a special Mother's Day program at
6:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Union.
The Service Cup is awarded an-
nually to the organized house whose
members have given the most cooper-
ation to the Foundation during the
year. Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority re-
ceived the honor last year.
Dean of Women Alice C. Lloyd will:
be one of the featured speakers on
the banquet program, which is to be
the occasion for the presentation of
awards earned by members of the
Foundation.
Mrs. Irma Lindheim, former na-
tional president of Hadassah, Zion-
ist women's organization, will give
the main address on "The Challenge
to College Youth."
Hillel Keys for outstanding partici-
pation in Foundation activities will
be presented to juniors, seniors and
graduate students, as well as to mem-
bers of the Hillel Players.
Seniors and graduates whose names
wjll be inscribed on the Hillel Cab-
inet Plaque for meritorious work at
Hillel during their college careers will
be announced at the, banquet.
The winners of two scholarship
awards, each valued at $150, will be
named. One will be given on tehe basis
of scholarship and necessity, and the
other is for general qualifications for
position of Hillel hostess during the
coming semester.,
All tickets will be reserved, and can
not be obtained at the Foundation.
Reservation must be in by noon to-
day.

A bout Novotna, Czechoslovak Singer

I Here

Is Today's,
In Summary

News

By MILTON ORSHEFSKY
Generally speaking, one is supposed
to take the utterances of publicity
agents with a generous helping of
salt. After all, when men's liveli-
hoods depend upon the .force of a
high-sounding superlative, they can-
not be expected to stop to credit their
exuberance.
But let it be said here that, when
they call Jarmila Novotna "the most
beautiful singer in Europe . . . the
Hedy LaMarr of the concert stage
. The Singing Duse, etc.," they are
adhering strictly to the matter of
common fact - all the hesitating-
qualifications of second-balcony con-
cert-goers to the contrary. For Mad-
ame Novotna, whether she is singing
in Brahms' Requiem (as she was
Thursday) or discussing Ann Arbor"
weather (as she was yesterday), is a
striking woman who carries her publi-
city titles and her real one - she
is a baroness by marriage- as 'though
she were born with them.
-At the present time, she is in town
Culer' T 1Lecture
1
Oan Learning Curve
Famed in the field of psychology
and a specialist in learning, Dr. El-
mer A. Culler, professor of psychol-
ogy at the University of Rochester
will deliver a University lecture on
"The Limiting For m of the Learning
Curve" at 8 p.m. Thursday in the
Auditorium of the W. K. Kellogg
Foundation Institute.
Doctor Culler is best known for his
experiments on the localization of
separatex tones in the cochlea of the
ear. He has served as president of
the Midwe'stern :sychology Associa-
tion and two years ago received the
award of the Society of Experimental
Psychology.
The lecture will be given under
hthe auspices of the Department of
Psvchology and is open to the public.

for her two-night participation in the
May Festival, part of her. first tour
in the United States. Apparently her
stay here comes as a welcome respite:
she is delighted and amazed at how
"peaceful" the town is.
Except on a football Saturday, it
was interjected. And immediately
JARMILA NOVOTNA
Madame Ncvotna wanted to go to a
'game to see,"Tom What's-his-name."
That being impossible, and also the
baseball game with Illinois because
of Festival concerts, she subsided with
a wistful, "Well, how about Sunday?"
U-

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because she was aware that in Amer-
ica, too, Sunday is a day of rest.
But despite her athletic inclinations
- she is an ardent horsewoman and
golfer -- she is still looking forward
to a very much-needed vacation in
California. After the Festival engage-
ment she is to sing in Seattle, along
with Norman Cordon, in an English
version (Madame Novotna is em-
phatic in her belief that more operas
should be translated into English)
of "The Bartered Bride." Then Cali-
fornia and "big waves" where she will
be joined by her husband, Baron Zau-
bek, and by their son and daughter.
The Zaubek family came to this
country last year from Czechoslavakia
when the mother was engaged by the
Metropolitan upon the recommenda-
tion of Toscanini. They have not been
back to Europe since, although they'
have an ancestral castle about 20
miles outside of Prague. Madame No-
votna's mother-in-law still lives there,
but it has been difficult, because of
inadequate communications, to "judge
wheter everything is O.K. or no, you
see?"
But, for the most part, the Czech-
slovak soprano wanted to talk yester-
day of Ann Arbor and of her exper-
iences here. Besides the Festival she
has been particularly impressed with
"the big bells" in the Carillon ("Is
it a man who makes them ring?"),
and with the fact that she has so
many "sorority sisters" in town. It
seemed she had hardly sat down when
she bobbed up apologetically to make
a luncheon of Sigma Alpha Iota, na-
tional musical sorority. She had
charmingly mispronounced the Greek
letters, but as she swept on, it was
clear that, even without knowing
exactly how things worked, she likes
it here.

' Dr. Charles W. Brashares, pastor
of the First Methodist Church, was
elected president of the Ann Arbor
Community Fund at the first meeting
of the board of directors Thursday.
He suceeds Albert Fiegel, local cloth-
ing merchant.
Dates for the annual drive were
;et for October 27 to November 5 and
Dr. Brashares has asked that local,
organizations reserve this period for
an intensive drive.
** *
Legal publication of the two city
parking ordinances was registered
yesterday in the Ann Arbor News
and they will go into effect May 19.
New buildings, or those materially
altered after the ordinance goes in-
to effect, must provide adequate
parking facilities wtihin three to
six hundred feet of the building,
depending on the nature of the
structure.
A' Board of Appeals will review
cases in which the builder cannot
comply with the letter of the law.
If the ordinance causes undue
hardship, or the space provided
is within the spirit and purposes
of the ordinance, exceptions may
be granted.
A separate ordinance for theatres
and other places of amusement
provides for parking pabe for one
car for every 12 seats.
A third ordinance, providing that
store and restaurant owners pro-
vide parking facilities for half their
employes was referred back to com-
mittee upon the objections of sev-
eral aldermen who said the passage
of this bill would cause undue hard-
ship upon such owners.
Cloisters of the Law Quadrangle
have been chosen the site for the
1941 Ann Arbor Citizens' Flower Show
June 3. Besides the natural beauty
of theopen air exhibition, the quad-
rangle showing will allow free admis-
sion to the public.

Between 40 and 50 high school
juniors from 15 cities and towns will
come to; Ann Arbor for the weekend
of May 16-17, as the guests of the
University of Michigan Clubs in their'
respective cities, for txle first Junior
Award Day, sponsored by the Alumni
Association.
In the interest of the University
and to secure a closer relationship
between the Clubs and the students
in their communities, interviews were
secured with high school principals
and junior class advisers, and re-
cipients were chosen for Junior
Award trips, to the University.
During their stay on campus, the
students will be housed through the
Union and the League, and will at-

tend conducted tours around the
University and interviews with pro-
fessors and administrative officers,
as well as varied entertainments.
Juniors have been selected for the
Awards because they can be aided
in choices for the remainder of their
high school period and because they,
in turn, will be able to advise their
fellow schoolmates.
Dr. Alexander To Talk
Dr. John Alexander, professor of
surgery will be the 1941 Calhoun
lecturer before the Georgia State
Medical Society at its meeting May
13-15 in Macon.

WS"
"~-M

like
Mney
from
home...
THAT'S WHAT

YOUR

SAVINGS

WILL MEAN-IF-

' '

N

Michigan Graduates Join Staff
Of New Detroit Radio Station

Two Michigan graduates, Richard
Slade, '41, and Edwin +. Burrows,
who received his Masters degree last
year, are members of the announcing
staff of The Detroit News' station
W45D, the first frequency modula-
tion Station in Detroit.
~Slade gained his radio experience
at the University broadcasting studio
and - at station WJLS in Wheeling,
W. Va. Burrows was the winner of
the major Hopwood Award for poetry
in 1940. He formerly worked at sta-
tion WICC, New Haven, Conn.
Authoriti' for commercial opera-
tion of the new FM station was
granted by the Federal Communica-
tions Commission yesterday. Tests
are now being made prior to 'the be-
ginning of a regular schedule.
With the completion of a 50, kilo-
wat amplifier installation W45D will
have power sufficient to give service
to an area of 6,800 square miles.
W. J. Scripps, manager of W45D,
has announced that the station will

not be a repeater but will have its
own original programs of news and
music. Both day and night pro-
grams will be offered.
The new FM station will provide
several advantages not present in
the amplitude modulation (AM) sta-
tions in the standard bands. It will
remove interference from static and
electrical appliances and reproduce
the full range of sound capable of
detection by the human ear.
Signals from the FM transmitter.
cannot be picked up by regular re-
ceiving sets because of the unusual
method of transmission. New com-
bination sets, however, are now being
put on the market to enable the lis-
tener to hear both AM and FM sta-
tions. Stations on the regular bands
will have better reception although
scome static will still be present. If
the interference is too great on the
regular band, the listener may turn
to the FM band for noise-free re-
ception.

500 Uniox Pins
Are Now Ready
For Claimants
More than 500 Union gold life pins
- symbolic of four years :membership
in the Michigan Union - are await-
ing claimers at the Union business of-
fices.
The pins will be given to any
man who will have completed four
years of accredited academic work
this June.
Since the installation of the life
membership plan in 1926 more than
13,000 pins have been distributed to
graduating seniors. A holder of the
pin is guaranteed life membership in
that he may use any of the Union
facilities at any time as well as cash
personal checks.
The pins are being distributed
through the business offices on the
basement floor of the Union, open
from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day.
Eligible students who do not claim
the free pins now will be required to
pay $50. for them if the pin applica-
tion is made after the end of the
present school year.
Less than 300 of the 800 pins have
been claimed this year to date, ac-
cording to Union President Robert
Sibley.
Finley Chosen President
In Forestry Club Election
William C'. Finley, '42F&C, yes
terday was elected president of the
Forestry Club for 1941-42. Chester
J. Ewing, '42F&C, was chosen to the
position of vice-president and social
chairman. For secretary, Robert "W.
Michaelson, '42F&C, was elected, and
Samuel L. Bellanca, '42F&C, received
the post of treasurer.
Retiring officers of the club are:
Frank L. Haggerty, '41F&C, presi-
dent; Gordon L., Watts, '41F&C,
vice-president and social chairman;
James W. Maddox, '41F&C, secre-
tary, and Frederick R. Walker,
'41F&C, treasurer.

I

Bob Westfall Will Aid,
In Kiwanis Paper Sale
Sporting a carrier bag and a Ki-
wanis sash, Bob Westfall, captain of
the 1941 football team. will sell the
annual Kiwanis club-Atn Arbor News
special edition to aid crippled and
underprivileged children, today at
the corner of University and State
Streets.
A goal of $1,000 has been set by
James McCarthy, chairman of the
sale. Club members will sell their
papers throughout the city in their
effort to raise money for unfortunate
children in the University hospital.
Church Gyroups'
To Have Outing
Here Sunday
Students from Michigan State Col-
lege, Wayne University, Michigan
Ncrmal and Northern Ohio Teachers
College will join the Lutheran Stu-
dent Association at 3:30 p.m. tomor-
row for an outihg at Zion Parish
Hall.
Prof. Paul G. Kauper of the Law
School, president of the Lutheran
Student Foundation of the Univer-
sity, is scheduled to speak.
For his sermontopic tomorrow
morning Mr. Roland Weideranders
of Zion Lutheran Church has chosen
"The God Fearing Mother." Subject
of the service at Trinity Lutheran
Church will be "The Comfort of
Knowing the Safe Guide to Truth.'
Lutheran Student 14ssociation a
cappella choir will meet for rehearsals
at 2:45 p~m.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

t
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.
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i
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f

You're wise and take advantage of
shopping values offered in Ann Arbor Now
WATCH THE DAILY FOR LATEST SHOPPING NEWS

I

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I

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111

CHURCH
DIRECTORY

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St., Phone 3916. loc
WANTED TO BUY - 4
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S-
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 31c
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW
'CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR SUITS, OVERCOATS.
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
SIAM'S, MINKS.' PHONE ANN AR-
BOR 6304 for APPOINTMENTS.
SAM.
FOR RENT
ROONS to rent for fall and sum-
mer. Approved house. Call 8726.
371
SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS
Large, comfortable rooms, two t
blocks from campus, reasonable.
Call 4850 or inquire 806 Hill.
ATTRACTIVELY FURNISHED two-
room apartment-3-way ventila-
tion-Private bath-shower. Re-
frigerapion. One adult. 602 Mon-
roe. 365
TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING

SITUATIONS WANTED -2
EXPERIENCED COOK with good
references would like position in
fraternity for fall. Write Box No.
1, Michigan Daily.
- TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. MissAllen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
FOR SALE

.

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
South Fourth Avenue.
Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
9:00 A.M. Service in the German Language.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship with Mother's. Pro-
gram, Sermon topic: "The Home Light".
6:00 P.M. Student Guild supper and fellow-
ship hour.
7:00 P.M. Young People's League. g
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Sts.
Dr. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
Willis B. Hunting.
Director of Student Activities,
Director of Music, Mrs. 1iary McCall Stub-
bins.
9:30 A.M. Junior and Intermediate Departments
of Church School.
10:30 A.M. Kindergarten and Primary Depart-
ments of Church School.
10:45 A.M. Services of Public Worship. Dr. Parr
will preach on "Missing the Great Things of
Life." I
4:30 P.M. Student Fellowship picnic will be held
at Saline Farms. Transportation will be pro-
vided at the church.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
10:30 A.M. Sunday Service,
11:45 A.M. Sunday School.
Free reading room at 206 E. Liberty St. ope4
daily except Sundays and holidays from 11:30
A.M. to 5 P.M. and on Saturdays till 9 P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State St. between Washington and Huron.
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares, and
J. Edward Lantz.
,Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director; Mary
Eleanor Porter, organist.
9:30 Student Class: Dr. George E. Carrothers,
leader.
10:40 A.M. Church School for Nursery, Begin-
ners, and Primary Departments. Parents
may, leave children there while attending

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis; Rector
The Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Assistant.
George Faxon, Organist and Choirmaster
8100 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:30 A.M. High School Class, Harris Hall.
11 :00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon by the
Rev. Henry Lewis.
11:00 A.M. Junior Church.
11 :00 A.M. Kindergarten, Harris Hall.
College Work Program.
Sunday, 7 P.M. Student meeting, Harris Hall.
"The Christian Student's Responsibility Now"
Student Panel Discussion. Also reports on
Inter-Guild Conference and Racine Confer-
ence.
Tuesday and Friday, 4-5:30 P.M. Tea, Harris
Hall.
Wednesday, 7:30 A.M. Holy Communion,
Chapel, Harris Hall,
rIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron.
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister.
Jack Ossewaarde, Organist and Director of
Music.
10:30-12:15 A unified service of worship and
study. Sermon: "In Praise of Motherliness."
10:30-12:15 A special program of worship, study,
and activity for children of the Kindergarten
and Primary groups,
3:30 P.M. The High School Young People's Fel-
lowship will meet at the church for a bicycle
ride to Delhi Park for supper.
6:30 P.M. The Roger Williams Guild will- meet
in the Guild House,~503 E. Huron. Prof. Geo.-
rge E. Carrothers, Department of Education,
will speak on "Choosing One's Religious Ex-
pression."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw-Dial 2-4466
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister
Lillian Dilts, Assistant
William Barnard, Director of Music
9:30 A.M. Church School. Classes for all age
groups.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon, "The
l 'milu Potrit." hbyDr. Lennon

THOROUGHBRED English Setter
puppies,3registered. Good hunting
strain. 3005 Plymouth Road. Ph.
532. 366
TAILORING & PRESSING- 12
STOCKWELL residents - Skilled al-
terations. promptly done. Just
across the street. Phone 2-2678.
A. Graves. 28c
MISCELLANEOUS
BEN THE TAILOR pays the best
price for used clothes. 122 E
Washington. If
PAINTING, Decorating; Paper Hang-
er. Blending and stippling. Work
samples shown. Phone 2-2943. 363
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19e
TRANSLATIONS-English, German

ORDER YOUR
CRRDS TODRY
:f: }i0 : C'.
i'.:::.{"i:N ::

(Continued from Page 4)
for children of the Kindergarten
and Primary groups.
3:30 p.m. The High School Young
People's Fellowship will meet at the
church for a bicycle ride to Delhi
Park for supper.
6:30 p.m. The Rogers Williams
Guild will meet inthe Gyild House.
Prof. George E. Carrothers, Depart-
ment of Education, will speak on
"Choosing Ones's Religious Expres-
sion."
Unitarian Church: 11:00 a.m. May
Forum on: "What is Worth Fighting
For?" as discussed by a youth panel
composed of Charles Koethen, Jr.,
Charles Karpinski, Robert Speck-
hard, and George Mutnick. Prof.
Anthony Jobin, chairman.
Question period is an integral part
of the Forum.
1

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QUA ANITY
LIFE INSURANCE

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}

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