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May 08, 1941 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY,

,.....
_ __. . ...

ROTC Dance,
Will Carry Out
Martial Theme
Military Drill, Comical Sketch
Will Be Shown By Marchers
And Drum And Bugle Corps
The 23rd annual Military Ball to
be held from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. tomor-
row at the Union Ballroom, will be
led by general chairman James F.
Kuhns, '41, and, his guest Mary Ellen
Everett, of Greensburg, Pa.
Isham Jones and his orchestra will
furnish the music for the dance, set-
ting the pace and the mood by
playing his own composition, "We're
In The ."Army Now."
Marchers To Perform
Marchers and musicians will dis-
play military precision when the
,Drum and Bugle Corps and the Drill
Team take over during intermission.
The Drill Team will give a short
and comical sketch of the draftee in
his first days, then the crack team
will perform straight manual move-
ments. The Drum and Bugle Corps
will play both field music and Army
bugle calls as a part of the enter-
tainment.
Arch To Be Formed
Following these events, the junior
initiates of Scabbard and Blade, mili-
tary honor society, will form the tra-
ditional saber arch in the midst of
a strictly military atmosphere created
by the elaborate decorations. ,
Tickets priced at $3 are now on
general sale at the Union desk, Bill
Blanchard, '41E, publicity chairman,
said.
To Aid Chairman
Aiding Kuhns in preparation for
the, dance are Joseph Matt, '42E,
secretary, Jack Payton, '42M, music
chairman, and Thadeus Kucharski,
'42E, decorations.
William Blanchard, '41E, is head
of the publicity committee with John
Scheibe, '42M, and Douglas Jeffrey,!
'42E, is programs and favors chair-
man. Lindley Dean, Spec., is pa-
trons and guests chairman, Elmer
Foster, '41E, is entertainment chair-
man, and Robert Radkey, '42E, is in
charge of invitations. Brent is also
treasurer of the Ball.
Lt. Leonard W. Paterson, of the

Lead Annual Ball

Cartoon Contest To Encourage
BiggerAnd Better Doodling Art

JAMES F. KUHNS

Women Urged
To Attend Daily
Tryouts Today
Every fall they come around, a new
crop of willing women's staff tryouts.
They are a year older, smart and
eager, but as helpless as the freshman
being herded through on inspection
tourg.-
"What's a b.f.?"
"How do you work these phones?
What do I punch?" .
"How much do you count for M?
Where's the room where they keep
the cuts? Why didn't they print my
story?"
This year in order to enable next
fall's try-out staff to get a head
start, the spring try-out period is
being extended. A special meeting for
all available freshmen women is being
held this afternoon, gathering at the
women's desk in the Student Publi-
cation's Building at 4:30, Janet Hiatt,
'42, new Woman's Editor, announced.
The training period, which includes
instruction in head writing, and gen-
eral familiarity with the Woman's
Page style, will prepare freshmen
and sophomores for work in the fields!

If you don't doodle, you're not
human! Everybody doodles in class,
.o this time doodle neatly on a clean
sheet of paper and who knows, the
committee in charge of the Doodle
Dance may hand you a luscious five
dollar bill.
Go lose yourself in a telephone
booth, or slouch down in a good stiff
classroom seat and the next thing
you know you've got a doodle child
there in front of you and that's all
you need, says Anthon Endres, '41A,
chairman of the Doodle Dance Car-
toon Contest.
Open To Anybody
The contest, sponsored by the com-
mittee in charge of the Doodle Dance,
the absent-minded artists' spree, is
open to anybody on campus who
thinks his cartoon, sketched in an
oblivious moment, might have some
point 'to it.
You don't have to be genius, En-
dres said emphatically, you just need
some idea, the crazier the better,
concerning the various phases of cam-
pus life, such as activities, publica-
tions, faculty members, BMOC's, etc.
Cartoons may be presented in black
and white or any color or combination
of colors desired, and any media may
be used, but it is required that
sketches are made on the regular 8
x 11 sized sheet.
Doodles will be judged by a jury
composed of prominent professors
and outstanding campus celebrities.
In order to make the judging purely
Sophomore Cabaret
Interviews To End
Tomorrow At 5 P.M.
Interviews for Sophomore Cabaret
central committee positions will close
at 5 p.m. tomorrow. Originality and
uniqueness of ideas for a central
theme will weigh heavily in a choice
of chairman.
"Sunshine, Inc.," .1940 Sophomore
Cabaret, was the first to have its
central committee chosen in the
spring instead of the fall immediately
preceding the fair. It is hoped that
plans for next years cabaret will be
sufficiently organized before the close
of school to allow the use of the sum-
mer to mold and organize around the
theme.
Freshmen who have filled petitions
should bring eligibility cards to their
interviews today or tomorrow, be-
tween 3 p.m. and 5 p.m.
Junior Assistantship
Position Is Offered

impartial, contestants are asked to
sign a fictitious name or symbol on
the front of the cartoon and to seal
his true name in an envelope on the
back.
Urges Jury Preferences
Contestants are urged to indicate
on the back of their cartoons any
preferences they might have as to
who should be on the jury, Endres
said.
First and second place prizes of
$5 and $3 respectively will be awarded
the winning doodlers while two con-
solating prizes of $1 each will be pre-
sented. Prizes will be awarded during
the Doodle Dance which will be held
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday, May 16.
Information Desk
For additional details on the Car-
toon Contest, students may go to
the information desk which will bel
situated in the main lobby on the firstI
floor of the Architectural Building,
Endres-announced.
Cartoons may be submitted at the
desk from 9 a.m. to 12 noon Saturday
and next week. Entries will be re-
ceived from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,
May 12 through Thursday, May 15.
This desk will beopen from 3 p.m.
to 5 p.m. today and from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Friday, for information only.

Senate Dance
Prof its To Aid
Needy Students
Tickets for the Scholarship dance
to be held from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Friday, May 23, in the Union Ball-
room will be sent to fraternities,
sororities, dormitories and other
groups for distribution today, Wil-
liam Todd, '42, tickets chairman, an-
nounced.
This affair, the first of its kind,
will, be sponsored by the Student
Senate for the purpose of aiding
needy students on campus. Money
raised by the dance will be turned
over to the regular University de-
partments which handle the award-
ing of scholarships to students in
need of financial support.
The committee in charge, headed
by Edward Tann, '43, has asked the
Scooperation of other campus groups
in sponsoring the dance.
Bill Sawyer and his orchestra will
play for the affair which will be
informal. The. admission will be
the same as it is for the regular
Union weekend dances.
The committee in charge of the
dance is made up of John McCune,
'41, patrons chairman; Jane Sapp,
'41, publicity chairman; William
Todd, '42, tickets chairman, and
William Ellman, '43, house chairman.

Alpha Kappa Lambda announces
the election of new officers: presi-
dent, Allan Hamilton, '43E; vice-
Nresident, Robert Fisher, '42A; re-'
cording secretary, Richard Gile, '42E,
and corresponding secretary, Gil-
bert Walker, '43.
Recently pledged are Joseph Scott,
'43E, and Russell Carey, '42A, while
those newly initiated are Howard
Fiedler, '41F, George Damon, '44E,

F]FOR
Fl
rv
117--
2 A ~~G IV E DA N IEL G RE EN S
Feet look their prettiest in Daniel l
F
r. 4 wGreen slippers. And feel their
- youngest! Give Mother a pair of
these dainty slippers. We have
t them in just the colors she loves to
rwear. Come in and see them.
First National Building
F
108 East Washmngton Phone 2-2685
F ~

John Steding, '44E, Ted Denise, '43,
and Gilbert Walker, '43.
Chi Phi announces the election of
the following officers: Bill Schust,
'42, president; Alan Harris, '42E,
vice-president; James Vardaman,
'42F, secretary; Howard Clark, '42,
treasurer; Fred Becker, '44E, Chap-
ter room; Loren Robinson, '43, his-
torian, and Donald Naulin, '42E
house m'anager.

Fraternities Announce Officers

Campusl roups Will Compete
In Annual Lantern Night Swing

military science department, is aiding' of fashion, social reporting, feature
with the plans. writing, and organization coverage.
College Qraduates May Obtain
Jobs Through Ci Service Exams

Twenty-four campus groups have
entered the annual Lantern Night
Sing, sponsored by WAA, which will
be held Monday, May 19,. at Palmer
Field.
A drawing to be held at 3:30 p.m.
tomorrow in the WAB, will determine
the order in which the organizations
shall sing. Each group is asked to
send one representative to this draw-
ing, then from these one girl will be
chosen to do the actual drawing.
Groups Will Sing
Virginia Paterson, '42, chairman
of the ?Sing, has announced that
Adelia Cheever will do a spiritual,
"Can't Stay Away;" Betsy Barbour,
"Michigan Memories;" Couzens Hall,
"In College Days," and Jordan Hall,
"Memories of Michigan."
"Song of Michigan" will be ren-
dered by Martha Cook; "Pipes of
Spring" by Mosher Hall; and "Oh,
Lovely Night" by Stockwell. Alpha
Chi Omega will sing "Alpha Chi;"
Alpha Delta Pi, "Sweetheart Song,"
and Alpha Gamma Delta, "Alpha
Gam Memories."
Songs Are Varied
"A O Pi Girl" will be sung by Alpha
Omicron Pi; "Alpha Phi Waltz Med-
ley," by Alpha Phi; "The Quill I
Love," by Alpha Xi Delta, and "Chi
Omega Toast" by Chi Omega.
Also singing will be Collegiate Sor-
osis which will present "Father
Time;" Delta Delta Delta, with "The

Pearl Song;" Delta Gamma with
"Now I Am Anchored In Thee;" and
Gamma Phi Beta with "Gamma Phi
Serenade."
Glee Club To Sing
Kappa Alpha Theta will sing
"Theta Lips;" Kappa Delta, "Swing
It K.D.;" and Kappa Kappa Gammria,
"Deep Blue Shades." Phi Sigma Sig-
ma will render "Sweetest Music Re-
sounds Afar;" Pi Beta Phi, "My Pi
Phi Girl," and Zeta Tau Alpha, "To
Zeta."
The Women's Glee Club will sing
while the judges are deciding on the
winner of the Sing.
'M' To Be Formed
Campus women will assemble on
the library steps at 7 p.m. and will
march to Palmer Field. Seniors,
wearing caps and gowns, will receive
lanterns at the library steps, an-
nounced JanetnLewin, '42, in charge
of Lanterns, and will carry these to
Palmer Field where, after the block
"M" is formed, the lanterns will be
passed to the junior women.
613 GIRLS FROM 188
COLLEGES are now at
Katharine Gibbs secre-
tarial schop. Write for
catalog describing Spec-
ial Course for College
Women.
*1 . 6.W C4. I

I

By RHODA LESHINE
Editor's Note: Each year the Federal
Government attracts numerous college
graduates who seek positions in Uncle
Sam's vast network of public admin-
istration. This story is an attempt to l
describe some phases of the operation
of the merit system.
Doors to careers composed of hun-
dreds of varied activities may bez
opened by joining forces-without a1
uniform-with the Federal Govern-t
ment through civil service examina-
tions.
Out-of-door occupations as well as
desk jobs and professional and scien-
tific pursuits involving research
problems and the actual operation
of industrial plants are open underI
the Commission's competitive exam-
inations for entrance appointment to
all citizens of the United States who
meet the admission requirements.
Appointments Made
During the 12 months which ended
June, 1940, entrance appointments
were made to approximately 68,000 of
the available 727,000 positions. Job
appointments may be made any-
where in the United States or her
territories with almost one-half of
all positions being in the Post Office
Department.1
About one-seventh, however, of all
civil service positions are for appoint-
ments to jobs in the Washington
headquarters of Federal agencies.
And here is where the opportunities
for the college man and woman shine.
The U.S. Civil Service Commission
bulletin points out that since "the
majority of the positions at Wash-.
ington are administrative, * profes-
sional, sub-professional, scientific, or
clerical in character, a college edu-
cation is more frequently required in
examinations for positions at Wash-
ington than in those for positions
outside it."
Exams Test Ability
A general procedure for securing
positions is followed in most cases.
From time to time the Commission
holds competitive examinations to
obtain lists of persons who are qual-
ified for the work of particular
groups of Government positions.
These exams use carefully tested
methods for measuring ability and

are graded on a fair and accurate
basis.
Appointments to positions of the
type for which the examination was
held are made by Government agen-
cies, as vacancies occur, from the
names at the top of the list-all
names of those passing the exam
having been listed in the order of
the grades or "ratings."
Entries Due Soon
Students may sign up for open
events in Crop and Saddle Club's
Horseshow to be held May 17, be-
tween 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. today and
tomorrow in the League Lobby,
Mary Hayden, president, said.

t

Sophomore Women
A new position, Junior Assistant,
available to an eligible sophomore
woman, will be added to the sixteen
Theatre-Arts chairmanships open for
petitioning this week. The job will be
concerned with learningi to under-
standethe general management of the
Children's Theatre, Virginia Apple-
ton, '42, Theatre Arts Chairman ex-
plained.

A~ ~.
4.
--'I

VON7. FORGET
TO REMEM8ER_.
71

Ticket Sale Continues
Tickets for Senior Ball remain on
sale for seniors from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
today and tomorrow, in the League
and Union lobbies. Half the tickets
were sold yesterday, according to Bill
Elmer, '41, publicity member of the
dance committee.

....crfi

i

r,

I'

11

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at Goodyear's State Street
A New Shop
of GiftS
and Occasional Furniture
Of special interest to Mother's Day shop-
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objects for the home, both decorative and
useful . . . this new addition to our

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If she's hard to fit, ask
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From the new series of clothes by r'
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short sleeve two-button jacket pair-
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We invite your early

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