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May 01, 1941 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1941

Patriot 'Togo' Sends Message
To His Native Japanese People

Concert Band
To Play Today

Scholarship Winners Named
0.

By ROBERT MANTHO
Togo, the Japanese patriot whom
the military government of Japan
seeks to liquidate, knocked on my
door yesterday. He said he wanted
to talk to me - understood I was
a reporter - and pleaded it was for
.he sake of Japan. "Youi must print
3 messageto my people that the gov-
rnment and Matsuoka are leading
Japan to ruin!"
We stepped into my room - and
I heard Togo's story. His eyes shone
brightly as he told it. He spoke quick-
ly and gestured emphatically.
"Back in the fourteenth century,"
he said, "the germ of the idea that
the Japanese Emperor was God began
to be felt in Japan. A group which
sought to gain control of the govern-
ment made this concept its cardinal
policy and attempted to glorify the
Emperor as much as possible."
The more glorious .the name of the
Emperor was made to appear, the
easier it was to keep him out of sight.
Then the group went to work and got
rid of the Emperor's aides, substitut-
ing themselves in the vacated posi-
tions, he continued.
"It was not long before the Em-
peror was made a mere figurehead,
locked up somewhere and performing
only ritual routine. But the succes-
sive groups in control were essentially
patriotic and every act they per-
formed under the name of the Emper-
or was calculated to promote:the best
interests of Japan."
There came into power some time
ago the family Ashikaga, Togo told
me. And the deeds of that family are
looked upon by the Japanese today
"with deep distaste."
"Never before in the history of
Japan was such shame brought to
its people than during the regime of
the first family of Ashikaga. Today
the Japanese want to forget that dark
and terrible time."
With this as a background, Togo
caine to the point: "1I understand

you are a reporter. And I need a
Newspaper to help accomplish what
I seek to do for my country. Some-
how what I say must reach the
Japanese people! What I say must
be disseminated in my country.
Every Japanese patriot must be
maderto realize that the present
military government in control of
Japan is leading our country to
ruin! You are the man I choose to
perform my mission."
He became excited and his voice
rose. "You must print this message
to the Japanese people.f"
Who shall I say sends this mes-
sage?" I asked him.
"Togo, the Japanese patriot, who
loves his country more than life it-
self."
So here is Togo's message to his
Japanese people, exactly as he gave it
to me:
"To our great "dismay, Matsuoka-
san (honorable Mr. Matsuoka), the
Foreign Minister of Dai-Nihon (of
the Great Japan), is following the
well-beaten path to Berebtesgaden,
still warm from the footpads of
such servile fellows as Mr. Schuss-
nigg. Never since the dark and
sorrowful days of the first Ashi-
kaga has a government official
been so depraved. Never before has
a minister of Yaomato identified
himself with slaves! Japan has nev-
er seen such a thing!"
He wouldn't say any more - who
he was, what he was doing in this
country, why he sent the message.
As far as I know, he's still Togo,
the Japanese patriot, "who loves his
country more than life itself."
Robert Titus Chosen
I President Of Mimes,
Robert Titus, '42, was elected presi-
dent of Mimes, honorary dramatic
fraternity, at the organization's meet-
ing last night.
Bill Slocum, '42, was chosen vice-
president. Corresponding and re-
cording secretary are Bruce Forbes,
'42, and Tom Goodkind, respectively.
Bob Sibley, '42, was chosen librarian.
for next year's Mimes Opera and
Charles Boynton, '42, the new treas-
urer.
Retiring president James Neilson,
'41, and James Gormsen, '42, gen-
eral chairman of next year's show,
announced that six manuscripts had
been received for the 1942! produc-
tion.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page S)

Grand
Will

Rapids
Feature

Program
Correll

The University Concert Band under
the direction of Prof. William D. Re-
velli, will play today in South High
school, in Grand Rapids.
Betty Correll, '44SM, formerly
,rombonist in Phil Spitalny's orches-
Ira, will be featured as soloist.
The program consists of: Stars and
Stripes Forever by Sousa; Elsa's Pro-
cession to the Cathedral by Wagner;
The Deserted Ballroom by Gould;
Thoughts of Love, trombone solo by
Betty Correll, by Pryor; A Step Ahead
by Alford; Cowboy Rhapsody by
Gould; Land of the Free by Rogers,
cornet solo by Raymond Crussara;
and Finale to the New World Sym-
phony by Dvorak.
The concert is sponsored by the
Grand Rapids Kiwanis as a part ofI
the drive to aid crippled children.

June Tenby Larson, '41, and John
V. Falconieri, '42, were announced as
the winners of the La Sociedad His-
panica summer scholarships to the
University of Mexico at a meeting
of the Spanish group yesterday. Pro-
fessor E. A. Mercado of the Romance
Languages Department, in announc-
ing the recipients of the competitive
awards, also named Norma C. Ben-
nett, '41, and Claude L. Hulet, '42, as
altekrnates.
The scholarships carry a stipend
of $80 and each was awarded on the
results of written and oral examina-
tions designed to test the contestants'
general knowledge of Hispanic cul-
ture and civilization. The judging
committee, composed of Prof. Joseph
Lincoln, Prof. Jose Albaladajo, and
Prof. Nelson Eddy, also considered the
benefit which each candidate could
derive from the scholarship.
In the selection of the new officers
for next year, Hulet was chosen pres-
ident of the language cslub; Doreen
Voiles, '42, was elected vice-presi-
dent; Carmelita Rosasco, '42, and
Ray Chambers, '41, were named sec-

retary and treasurer, respectively.
Don Rivitte, '41, will head the new
membership committee composed of
Catherine Osborne, '43, and Albert
Wohl, '43. Herbert Kilner, '41, and
Ruth Bennett, '43, were announced as
the publicity committee; Judith Per-
kins, '42, reporter; and Antoinetta
Ferretti, '42A, Ernest MacCarus, '44
and David Falvay, '43.rcompose the
music committee under the chair
manship of Orville Lefko, '42.
Saturday, May 3, was selected for
the club picnic scheduled for.4 p.m.
interested club members are asked to
telephone Lefko immediately for res-
ervations.
The meeting was concluded with a
program of trombone selections by
Falvay, accompanied by Al Water-
stone. '43SM.

Local Chess Club
Offers Instruction
To Student Novices
Students will have the opportunity
to learn to play chess through the
special lessons offered by the Ann
Arbor Chess Club at 7:30 p.m. to-
day in Room 302 of the Union.
Lessons have been prepared in
mimeographedformeand assistance
of an expert will be given in improv-
ing playing. Instructors include
members of the faculty and local
fans.
The International Chess Code will
be the starting point of the lessons
which will be offered.
Read The Daily Classifieds!

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
PRIVATE INSTRUCTION - 12 TYPING

A real Spring housecleaning

Hundreds of
BARGAIN BOOKS
5c - 10c - 25c - 49c
Some are from old Libraries,
and others are discontinued
Text and Reference Books on
Every Subject.

LEATHER GOODS
1/2 price
Zipper note books and
Brief cases of all kinds.
Slightly shopworn stock,
salesman's samples and
factory closeouts.

TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,!
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 1ec
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St., Phone 3916. 10c
MISCELLANEOUS
BEN THE TAILOR pays the best
price for used clothes. 122 E.
Washington. 1c
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates. Weave-Bac
Shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade.
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c

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Our Entire Rental Library . 1/3 off
(Many are practically new)
1c Stationery Brand new
(Boxes are slightly soiled)
One box at regular 1938 ENSIANS
price and a second box 89C
of same kind at I1c.

WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run
listings of your vacant houses in
The Daily. Dial 23-24-1 for spe-
cial rates. 353
LOST and FOUND
LOST-No. 7 Gr adidge Whitcombe
D3luxe golf club. Part of complete
set. Call Sidley, 2-3343. 359
SITUATIONS WANTED-2
SITUATION WANTED-Experienced
couple for fraternity cook and por-
ter. First class local reference.
Phone 6764. 350

sound: Monday evening at 7:30 in the And many many more items too numerous to mention. ".".r. FOR MICHIGAN
Rackham Auditorium the Interna- Come over and browse - you might make a find. Tues., Wed., Thurs.
tional Center will present moving puc-'9PM.E T
tures of a trip from Denver to Salt
Lake City. This is part of the Cen- C. B. S. Stations
ter's program of travel information
The public is cordially invited.
All girls interested in lvng inCo-
Operative houses next semester are ANN ARBORS BUSY BOOKSTORE
invited to attend luncheon at Alice
Palmer House Sat., May 3. Call Ruth Copyright 1941, LIGGETT & MYER omCCO Co.
Eddy, 2-2218
.ZiI~ra a tc eaJ
H
CONRAD NAGEL d/O
LQHt.it 1
"THE MALE ANIMAL" es
SYLVIA SDNEY
MA DGEEVANS COUNTER SHLE OF SE RSON TICKETS LVIA IDNEY
"Man and Superman" OPENS TOD4Y FRT 10 -R. M. "Golden Boy'

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THE LIGHT in the WINDOW
No matter how distant, back home there's a
light in the window and your Mother is think-
iAg of you!
Nothing you could, give would make her so
happy as a photograph of you as you are today!
Mother's Day is getting close - stop in today
e f ore ybu forget!

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