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May 01, 1941 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-01

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THURSDAY, MAY 1, 1941

THE MICHJGAN DAILY

PAGt TAAEF

THE MICHIGAN BATTY - *a - a. .aaw.asA

_ - . r

d

Michigan

Nine

Loses,

2-0; Netters

Invade

East

Lansing

+

_ __

h.

Western State
Scores Twice
In Last Inning
Wise, Gould Pitch Hitless
Ball For Eight Frames;
Overmire Bronco Star
(Continued from Page 1)
into left field. Whitey Holman dove
for the ball and barely faied to come
up with it.
Bill Hill followed with a bunt -to
Gould's left which the Michigan
pitcher fumbled and all hands were
safe. Then, with men on first and
second, Johnny Cuckovich, slugging
Western left fielder, laid down anoth-
er bunt.
Ruehe Breaks Up Play
George Ruehle, Wolverine first
baseman, had the play pegged per-
fectly, however. He ran in, scooped up
the ball and fired it to third, forcing
Coorlas for the first out.
Bob Metzger, Bronco second sack-
er, then slapped a Gould fast ball into
center field for the second and final
Western hit. Hill scored and Cucko-
vich took third on the bingle.
Denny Yarger followed with the
third bunt of the inning along the
first base line and, once again, Gould
failed to handle the ball cleanly.
Cuckovich tallied the second Western
.x un on the error but Metzger was
thrown out trying for third on the
play. Bob Jenkins ended the fatal
frame, popping to Bill Steppon at
second.
Michigan Threatens Mildly
The Wolverines threatened very
mildly in their half of the ninth when
Ruehle singled to center after two
were out. Nothing came of it, though,
since Bud Chamberlain forced him at
second a moment later to end the
game.
Cliff Wise, who started the game on
the hill for Michigan, was never in
trouble. Only one man reached base
4 during the four innings he worked,
Mill drawing a pass in the first frame.
Gould was almost as effective during
his first four trips to the mound, giv-
ing up "but one walk although two
men reached base on errors.
Michigan's only serious threat came'
in the fourth stanza when, after two
were out, Bill Steppon drew a base
on balls and went to third on Dick
Wakefield's hard single down the
right field line. They both died on
the base-paths, however, when Rueh-
le ended the inning with a strike-out.
Wolverines Meet Ohio State
This afternoon, the Wolverine nine
will leave for Columbus, Ohio, where
they will tangle with Ohio State's
strong club in a two-game series on
Friday and Saturday.
The traveling squad will include
pitchers Wise, Gould, Neil Muir and
Mickey Stoddard; catcher George
Harms; infielders Chamberlain, tep-
pon, Ruehle, Mike Sofiak and Wayne
Christenson and outfielders Holman,
Wakefield, Davey Nelson and Bill
Cartmill. Coach Ray Fisher and Man-
ager Charley Knapp complete the
traveling squad.
Heartbreaker

dol wirtchafter's
I DAILY DO UBLE

j

I

(This week's Doubles are being written by members of the Junior staff.
Today's column is by Norm Miller who covered basketball during the winter.)
Ray Fisher Reminisces ., .
The tall, skinny kid on the mound looked good. His fast ball had a
baffling hop and exploded with a grack in the catcher's mitt, while his curve
darted like a butterfly and left the hitters swinging at air. It was late in
the game, the score was tied, and a runner on third edged menacingly away
from the base.
Once again, the rookie glanced at his catcher, nodded in assent as
the squatting figure signalled for a curve ball, cast a disdainful look at
the baserunner, and started his windup. Suddenly, without the slightest
warring, the runner broke for the plate.
Panic-stricken, the kid forgot all about the curve ball he was supposed
to throw. He broke his windup in the middle and heaved the horsehide in
the general direction of the plate. The bewildered catcher, steeled for a
curve, hesitated a fatal second; then, completely fooled, made a futile grab
for the sailing pitch. The ball caroomed off the backstop, the winning run
crossed the plate and the visage of one young Raymond Fisher wore a slight
crimson tinge for weeks afterward.
That was Ray's most embarrassing moment in 10 years of major
league baseball. But the recollections of that fateful afternoon added to
a myriad of more pleasant happenings the Varsity baseball mentor has
experienced in a decade ,in the big show have left an imprint on Ray's
memories that have yielded the mild-mannered New Englander many a
pleasant moment of reminiscence in the 21 years since Ray left the pro-
fessional ranks to impart his baseball knowledge to college hopefuls. And
eight years with the New York "Highlanders," progenitors of the modern
Yankees, and two more with the world champion Cincinnati Reds merit
Ray an A-1 rating when it comes to spinning yarns.
For instance, there was the occasion of Ray's biggest thrill-the time
he fanned thefamed Tyrus Raymond Cobb in the clutch. The one-time
Vermont school teacher had been sent into a game with the Tigers in the
ninth inning to protect a 2-1 lead and had put two men on the bases with
only one out to bring the dangerous "Georgia Peach" to the plate.
"I managed to slip two fast ones over on him for strikes," Ray re-
lates. "Then, when he wasn't looking, I 'snuck' a little spit on the ball
-it was legal back in those days. Old Ty took a cut at that pitch and
missed it by a foot and we won the game. Of course, he got back at me
later, but that was one thrill I'll never forget."
Then, Ray ruefully recalls the time when he pitched eight hitless in-
nings against the White Sox only to have some unknown and even to this
day unremembered hitter slap out a hit that prevented Ray from reaching
baseball's Hall of Fame.
As for Ray's biggest laugh-that took place in a game with the Wash-
ington Nationals many years ago. Ray Caldwell was pitching for the High-
landers, one afternoon, the score was tied and the winning run was in
scoring position, when Caldwell decided to walk the next batter to get at
"Germany" Schaeffer, one of the most colorful characters Fisher has ever1
known.
As Caldwell was tossing the four wide ones to the batter, Schaeffer
walked up behind the umpire, turned to the crowd, removed his cap with
an elaborate bow and announced to one and all that anyone who walked
a batter to get at the great Germany Schaeffer should have his head
examined, and to "keep your seats, everybody, this game'll be over in
just a minute." Whereupon Schaeffer strode to the plate and promptly
lashed out the hit that won the game.
There was the time Fisher made his debut as a starter against the
supposedly unbeatable Big Ed Walsh-and won. "I threw a million curves
that day," Ray tells. And there was also the day when Ray dropped an 18-
inning heartbreaker to old Art Nehf of the New York Giants.
There was Ray's first meeting with Rogers Hornsby when the "Rajah"
slapped out a long hit that should have won the game only to pass a back-
tracking baserunner who thought the drive had been caught, and thus put
both men out. And his best year with Cincy in which Ray won 14 and lost
six and then took part in the memorable "Black Sox" World Series are still
more fond recollections Ray will never forget.
"Yes, sir," chirps the dean of the Big Ten baseball coaches as he
recalls the days when ballplayers wore handlebar mustaches and the
prodigious home run had to take a back seat to the squeeze play and
the stolen base, "I wouldn't trade those experiences in the Big Leagues
for the world."
We can't say that we blame you either, Ray.

Tennis Team
Faces Strong
Foe In State
Capt. Tobin Leads Mates
In Try For Eighth Win;
Porter Meets Maxwell
(Continued from Page 1)
is often downright brilliant and he
boasts what is probably the hardest
service on the Wolverine squad. He
will likely face State's Frank Beeman
in the fourth singles match.
Tom Gamon will hold down the
number five spot for Michigan and
his Spartan opposition will probably
be furnished by Fred Krause. In the
final singles contest, Michigan's Al-
den Johnson will match strokes with
Bob Harris, Spartan number six.
State's Doubles Not Set
The Michigan State doubles com-
binations are not set definitely but.
barring late changes, Perkins and
Maxwell will handle the number one
match against Michigan's great Tob-
in-Hammett duo while Drilling and'
Beeman will play in the second posi-
tion and Krause and Harris will make
up the third Spartan pair.
Stille and Porter will make up
Michigan's second doubles team and
Gamon will team with Howard Ba-
con to form the third combination.
The two most interesting matches
on the docket should be the number
three singles tilt and the first doubles
contest. In the singles, Michigan's
Jim Porter, who serves with his left
hand and plays out the point with
his right, will face Spartan Bill Max-
well, an ambidextrous lad who shifts
his bat for each shot, thus eliminat-
ing the necessity for backhand shots.1
Tobin-Hammett Duo Standouta'
In the top doubles match, East
Lansing net fans will get a look at
the combination which rates, at this
writing, as the best in the Big Ten.
Capt. Jim Tobin has all the shots in
the book and he works perfectly with
Lawton Hammett whose net play is
probably the equal of that of any
player in the Conference.
M CLUB MEETING
There will be an important M
Club meeting at 8 p.m. this eve-
ning in the Michigan Union. All
members are requested to be there.
Francis Heydt, Secy.-Treas.

Study In Angles .

By HAL WILSON
Saturday's Michigan-Notre Dame
track meet possesses more angles
than a trig textbook.
Pitting two of the Midwest's out-
standing cinder powerhouses against
each other at South Bend, the dual
meet clash ranks as one of the na-
tion's top attractions of the current
outdoor campaign. It's a battle that
has everything. Records, revenge,
prestige, last-second lineup-juggling,
and even family tradition - all will
add a little spice to the affair.
Advance dope from the Irish camp
has it that Coach Bill Mahoney has
given up trying to guess the outcome.
Most experts on this end of the-line
are predicting a last-ditch fight with
the final mile relay event deciding
the champion.
This impending mile relay en-
gagement is a story in itself. Three

times this year have Notre Dame and
Wolverine quartets matched spikes.
In two indoor tests the Michigan
foursome copped close decisions, the
second one requiring a Yost Field
House record-shattering performance.
Last week at the Drake Relays the
Irish hung up a new Varsity outdoor
mark of 3 :15.9 to win the title when
the Maize and Blue fouled out of the
race.
Although it isn't definite yet, and
will depend entirely upon the way
points stack up at the last minute,
Wolverine Coach Ken Doherty may
shift Warren Breidenbach from his
half-mile berth to join Bob Ufer,
Jack Leutritz and Al Thomas in a
crack combination. Other possible
starters in the event are Bob Barnard,
who is also slated for the low hurdles,
Bill Dobson and Bob Reutter.
Several individual duels also claim a

share of the spotlight. In the shot
put Notre Dame's husky sophomore,
Jim Delaney, who nosed out Indiana's
Archie Harris for the Penn Relays
crown last week wil be the favorite.
But Michigan's senior Bob Hook,
heaving the iron nugget in the best
form of his career, exploded a 49 foot
toss in practice yesterday, and will
push the Irish lad hard.
Michigan Capt. Don Canham's fine
6 foot, 54 inch leap in practice this
week presages a hot duel with the
Irish Drake Relay co-champion,
Keith O'Rourke, while in the open
quarter Notre Dame's 440-yard speed-
ster, Ray Roy, and junior George
Schiewe will likely face Michigan's
Leutritz and perhaps Breidenbach
with the Cartier Field record of 48.5
seconds due to fall. Roy's anchor leg
last week was a full second faster.

, Varsity4rishl Track Meet

Ray Courtright Has Impressive
Record As Golf Squad Coach

By LYONS HOWLANDI
Strolling around the Golf Course
clubhouse any spring afternoon, one
can see, a white-capped, sun-tanned
figure busy at work with a group of
golfers on one of the practice greens.
"I'm getting that seven iron down
better, Corky," one of the group can
be heard to say.
From this, the observer can sur-
mise that it is none other'than Coach
Ray Courtright practicing with his
varsity golfers.
"Corky" has an outstanding record
behind him as he works with the
linksmen. He was graduated from the
University of Oklahoma in 1914 after
earning four letters in baseball, three
[in football, three in basketball, and
two in track. He was All-Southeastern
halfback for two years, and on the
diamond squad distinguished himself
by pitching a no-hitter against Mis-
souri.
After graduation, Courtright
coached at Tonkawa Prep School in
Oklahoma, and was named Director
of Athletics at the University of Ne-
vada. Here he turned out good teams,
winning in his first year the basket-
ball Pacific Coast title.
Before coming to Michigan, "Corky"
changed to Colorado School of Mines
and remained there three years. And
now, a member of Michigan's coach-
ing staff, Courtright has confined his

coaching activities to golf, aiding in
the development of such national
stars as Johnny Fischer, Chuck Koc-
sis, and others who have consistent-
ly given Michigan a strong golf team.
"Corky's" present links squad has
made an impressive showing this year,
winning four out of its first five
matches. Indeed, it seems imbued
with the enthusiastic talent and sin-
cerity of its coach.

FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Case System
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
Co-educational
Member of the Association of American
Law Schools
College Degree or Two Years of
College Work with Good Grades
Required for Entrance
Transcript of Record Must Be Furnished
Morning, Early Afternooftand
Evening Classes
For further information address
Registrar of Fordham Low School
233 Broadway, New York

Give your home a

$z

r

IT'S

A

BEACH

'
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i
;,

44L11

Major L
AMERICAN LEAGUE

league Standings

Western State AB
Fleser, cf ........ 4
Coorlas, 3b ..... 4
Hill, lb .........3
Cuckovich, if .... 4
Metzger, 2b ...... 4
Yarger, c ........ 3
Jenkins, rf ...... 4
Karchunis, ss .... 3
Overmire, p .......3

R
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

H
0'
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
13
2
1
5
3
3
0

A
0
1
1
0
2
2
0
3
1

E
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cleveland .........
Chicago ..........
New York .......
Boston ............
Detroit............
Philadelphia......
Washington......
St. Louis ..........

W
11
9
10
7
6
4
4
4

L
4
4
6
6
7
9
10
8

Pct.
.733
.692
.625
.538
.462
.308
.282
.273

St. Louis ..........
Brooklyn ..........
New York ........
Cincinnati ........
Chicago ..........
Boston ............
Philadelphia.......
Pittsburgh ........

w
10
13
8
7
5
6
5
3

L
3
4
6
8
7
9
10
10

Totals .......32 2 2 27 10 2

Michigan AB
Nelson, cf ........ 4
Holman, lf......4
Sofiak, ss........ 4
Steppon, 2b .......2
Wakefield, rf .... 4
Ruehle, lb .......4
Chamberlain, 3b .. 4
Harms, c......... 3
Wise, p .........1
Gould, p.........2

R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H O
0 2
1 2
1 1
0 2
1 1
1 15
0 2
1 2
0 0
0 0

A
0
0
4
2
0
2
4
0
2
3

E
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
2

Totals ...... 32 0 5 27 17 4

Western State ......
Michigan ......:...

000 000 002-21
000 000 000-0

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Pct.
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.765
.571
.467
.417
.400
.333
.231

AUTOMATIC

Runs batted in: Metzger, Yaeger.,
Stolen base: Sofiak. Double play :
Hill and Karchunis. Left on bases:
Western State 5; Michigan 7. Bases
on balls: off Overmire 2; off Wise
1; off Gould 1. Struck out: by Wise
2; by Overmire 6. Hits: off Wise 0
in 4 innings; off Gould 2 in 5. Los-
ing pitcher: Gould. Umpires: Vick
and Andrews. Time, 1:35.
FOR FASTERV
FRIENDLIER SERVICE

making the right impression
-on the right people-at the
right time. Wrinkle -resistant,
washable, softer to the skin...
and grand mixers with odd
slacks and sports coats.
At your clothier--today J 7,
Palm Beach Evening Formals (white
jacket and black trousers), $20. Palm
Beach Slacks, $5.50. And by the same
makers, the new Goodall Tropic Weight
-tops in lightweight worsteds-$25.
COODALL COMPANY * CINCINNATI

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ALMOST ANY FAUCET will supply cold water, with-
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carefree and automatic as electricity. You need
never lift a finger to heat water. Every day a supply
of hot water awaits you, ready for immediate use.
An electric water heater requires no attention
whatever. It makes no demands on your time or
patience, needs no supervision.
This newest electric service costs less than you
think. Even families in small 4-room houses now en-
joy automatic electric hot water-and pay only $1.98
a month. See your plumber, electrical dealer, hard-
ware or department store today. Or stop in at any
Detroit Edison office. The Detroit Edison Company.

75

Automatic electric hot water costs

5.-il...- I

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