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April 23, 1941 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDTN~SDAY, APPR1L 23, 1941

S I -

Adult Education
Institute Meets
HereApril 28
Specialists Will Discuss
Current Events; Davis
To Review New Books
Sandburg To Speak
Featuring celebrities such as Carl
Sandburg and Karl Detzer of the
Readers Digest, the ninth annual
Adult Education Institute will con-
vene here April 28 through May 2,
sponsored jointly by the University
Extension Service and the Michigan
State Federation of Women's Clubs
Carl Sandburg will deliver an ad-
dress on "Lincoln and the Present
Crisis" and Karl Detzer, roving ed-
itor of the Readers Digest, will dis-
cusd "Free Press and, Free Speech."
'Judith C. Waller of the Central Di-
vision of the National Broadcasting
Company, will highlight the last
day's program with a talk on "The
Radio and the Public."
Stressing the various aspects of
current events, the five-day Insti-
tute will be divided into sections on
music, literature, iiternational rela-
tions, art and speech, and economics
which will be treated each day by a
different local or nationally known
specialist.
Walter IllsleV, who returned last
fall after a year spent in Germany,'
Denmark, Norway and Sweden, will
give a sketch of his impressions of
the European nations under Nazi
dominance.
Each day during the Institute
Prof. Joe, L. Davis of the English
department will give a book review
on one of the recent best sellers. His
list includes "New England: Indian
Summer," "The Pilgrim's Way,"
"The Voyage," "For Whom the Bell
Tolls," and "Oliver Wiswell."
Officers Sele te d
For Adelia Cheever
Adelia Cheever House has an-
nounced the election of their offi-
cers for the coming year. The girls
who will serve as president, vice-
president, and secretary-treasurer,
respectively, are Louise Keller, '42,
Evelyn Kuivinen, '42A, and Marjory
Thomas, '43.
Four committee chairmen were
also chosen. They are Aini Rantala,
'43, scholastics; Lorraine LePage,
'43, scrapbook; Erica Moeckel, '43,
sports, and jean Groves, Arch, pub-
licity. Betty Woods, '44, is the new
representative in Assembly.
li ,

Michilodeon Brings Carnival
Spirit With Clowns And Kisses

-Daily Photo by Will Sapp
Michilodeon, a stage coach, horses and clowns were all quite thrill-
ing to these two little fellows when the Michilodeon carriage stopped
in front of the Union yesterday noon.

The Michigan campus got its first
taste of Michilodegn carnival spirit
yesterday.
A crew of student clowns - headed
by freshmen Jack Brackett and Clar-
ence Carlson - dashed around the
campus yesterday noon. in a horse-1
drawn 1841 stage-coach tossing can-
dy kisses and gum to the crowds
And enticing co-eds to ride with them
in the carriage.
Around noontime the stage coach
suddenly appeared at the Kappa and
Thetansorority houses and at Sigma
Chi and Delta Upsilon: to drop' off
basketfulls of kisses, candy and gum.
Michilodeon, the 1941 Spring Jub-
ilee, will make a two-night stand Fri-
day and Saturday, May 2 and 3, in
Waterman and Barbour gymnasiums.
Regular circus . acts, fraternity skits,
and dancing are on the schedule, ac-
cording to Charles Heinen, '41E, gen-
eral chairman of the show.,
More than 40 organizations have
entered skits or booths. The Thetas.
are preparing a Can-Can chorus and
the Betas plan to revive the "Follies
Beserk," the hit of the 1939 Michi-
gras celebration.
A doggy-derby is scheduled for fra-
ternity mascots, the Sigma Chi's are
going to present a barber shop quar-
tet and the Theta Delts are already

constructing a bar to be installed at
the show.
Promised to be the biggest carnival
ever presented on the campus since1
the turn of the century, the show will
be a nickel fun-fest, nothing to cost
over five cents, its sponsors claim.
Hillel Group Attends
MeetingInDetroit
Hillel night, an annual event at
the Louis Marshall Lodge of B'nai
Brith, was ceelbrated last night when
several members of the Michigan
Hillel traveled into Detroit to enter-
tain the organization.
A flute duet by Beatrice and Ger-
trude Rubin, '44SM, accompanied byI
Eleanor Samuel, '44SM, was a fea-
ture of the program. Jerome Meck-
lenburger, '41E, and Aaron Moyer, '43,f
past and present presidents of the
Hillel Foundation addressed thea
group, and Irving Zeiger acted as
master of ceremonies. Rabbi Jehu-
dah M. Cohen, director of the foun-
dation, gave a short talk and the win-
ner of the Michigan-Michigan State
oratory contest, Herbert London, '43
delivered his prize speech.

Rotary Clubs
W ill Convene
HereApril 26
Governor Van Wagoner
To Address Delegates
At Convention Banquet
Ann Arbor will play host to more
than 300 Rotarians and their wives
next week when they will entertain
2hapter delegates from the 54 Rotary
clubs in the organization's 153rd dis-
trict.
The convention, which will be the
fourth annual district conference, will
run from Sunday through Tuesday.
Among the highlights of the con-
ference will be the appearance of
Gov. Murray D. Van Wagoner at
the convention banquet next Monday.
Col. George A. Drew, leader of the
Ontario Conservative Party, will also
deliver an address at this dinner.
Concert On Schedule
The, conference will open Sunday
evening with the District Governor's
reception at the League. After a
supper at the League the Rotarians
will hear a concert by the University
K.ittle Symphony Orchestra.
Dean Samuel T. Dana, general
chairman of the meeting and vice-
president of the Ann Arbor chapter,
will preside over the first general ss-
sion of the conclave Monday morning.
Rev. Fred Cowin, of the Church
of Christ. will read the invocation,
and Prof. Leigh J. Young,. mayor-
elect, is scheduled to give a welcoming
address. Shirley Smith, vice-president
of the University, and Prof. Bennett
Weaver,, president of the host club,
will also speak briefly during the
Monday morning sessions.
Reception At Ruthvens
George E. Lewis, secretary of the
Ann Arbor Rotarians, and Roscoe
Bonisteel, will make the gift presen-
tation to retiring District Governor
Del Marr of Ridgetown, Ont. A re-
ception will be given for the visitors
at the home of Dr. Ruthven at 4
p.m. Monday.
In the evening Rotarians will at-
tend the district governor's ball. Ath-
letic exhibitions 'by University stu-
dents will be furnished during inter-
mission.
The final business session of the
conference will be held Tuesday
morning at the Rackham Building.
Addresses will be given at that time
by Elton Hascall, George Averill,
Richard Hedke, and Arthur Fitzger-
ald.

Four Outstanding Opera Stars
To Participate In May Festival

Four major opera stars, all new
aces to Ann Arbor, will participate
in the May Festival to be held May
7, 8, 9 and 10 in Hill Auditorium,
;upplementing the contributions of
an imposing list of former favorites
Jarmila Novotna, beautiful Cze-
,horlovakian soprano, new to the
.Tetropolitan Opera Association, ac-
cording to a tabulation of appear-
ances just released from New York
was' surpassed this season in num-
ber of appearances only by a veteran
Kirsten Flagstad.
Has Continental Fame
MadamenNovotna s repertoire i
extensive, and her performances are
so outstanding that she has been
pressed into service as often as op-
portunities presented themselves.
Before coming to America she dis-
tinguished herself particularly in
Prague, Budapest and Salzburg, as
well as at LaScala and Covent Gar-
dens, London.
Suzanne Sten, mezzo-soprano, al-
though young in years, is a veteran
performer, for she began her career
as a major opera singer at an earl3
age. She is ofdAustrian-Hungariar
background, and her principle suc-
cesses before coming to America were
in Vienna, Salzburg, Budapest anc
in the cities of Germany. She was
out of sympathy with conditions
there and left that country before
the war.
Kullman-Yale Man
The other two new faces are both
American, from widely separatec
parts of the country. Charles Kull-
man is a graduate of Yale University
While preparing himself for a medi-
cal career he participated in the
Yale Clee Club, and attracted sc
much attention that he finally shift-
ed his interest entirely to the field
of music.
After concert successes in the Ea t

liE-=--- --- -- -- ----_- __

he went abroad and won recognition
in the leading European operas; and
three years ago was invited to sing
the leading role at the Metropolitan
Opera in New York, where he is now
one of the most important members.
Harrell An Audition Winner
Mack Harrell is a bartone from
Texas. He first devoted himself to
,he violin, on which he is an excel-
ent performer. Two years #go he
-won first place in the Metropolitan
Opera Auditions of theAir contest,
and since that time has led a busy
life at the Opera, and in concerts,
where his services are always in de-
mand.
Dorothy Maynor and Enid Szan-
tho, soprano and contralto respec-
tively, were both heard in Ann Arbor
at the Festival last year. Their suc-
s cesses were so pronounced that they
have been brought back for a second
appearance. Miss Maynor will be
the star at the Friday evening con-
cert, and Madame Szantho will sing
Saturday night.

Petitions Asked
ForCongress
Independents May Apply
For Office Openings
Petitions for two offices in the or-
ganization of Congress, independent
men's association, will be due today,
and the remaining petitions will be
due Friday, according to William H.
Rockwell, '41, president of Congress.
Any eligible independent student
may apply for one or more of the
positions Friday, Rockwell explained.
Jobs open for next year's seniors
are president, secretary-treasurer and
two executive secretaries. These mem-
bers have seats in the Executive Com-
mittee and must hand in their peti-
,tions today.
Next year's juniors or seniors may
apply Friday for one or more of the
following committee chairmanships;
organization, social, student welfare,
scholarship, sports and publicity.

Art Exhibition To Close
Sponsored by the Ann Arbor Art
Association, an exhibition of thet
works of John James Clarkson will be
presented for the last times today and
tomorrow in the Rackham Building
Galleries.

Typewriters of all makes Bought, Sold, Rented, Exchanged,
Cleaned, Repaired. Supplies. One of the largest and best
stocks in the State.
0. D0 MORRILL
314 S. State ;St. (opposite Kresge's)
THE TYPEWRITER AND STATIONERY STORE
Since 1908 Phone 6615

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new

Slyj/ i + ยง'ird.

(jiJll2,

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

II
TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: For part or full
time work. Pretzel Bell. 339
TWO VWEEKS part-timeltrial period,
leading to full time summer work.
Apply Room 302 Mich. Union, 3-5
Wednesday.. 341
WANTED TO BUY -4
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR SUITS, OVERCOATS,
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
SIANS, MINKS. PHONE ANN AR-
BOR 6304 for APPOINTMENTS.
SAM.
TYPING
TYPING---Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
MISCELLANEOUS
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c

I*
(overt and Gaberdine
SUITS and TOPCOATS

'Ih ere's notlug harder to get than
coverts and g i-rdi*nes this spring .
and nothing sitaorvi . ' b.t. here
they are, and at no advance in price.
They're sleek - mellow - marvelous.

A real Spring housecleaning

Hundreds of
BargainBok
5c ml1c-a25c-w49c
Some are frota old Libraries, and others
are discontinued Text and Reference Books
on Every Subject.

Leather Goods
Zipper note books and
Brief cases of all kinds.
Slightly shopworn stock,
salesinan's samples and
factory closeouts.
1/2 price

I

I

s is at :24
,roIpt,.&, tat
*23- gc. berd me . .. w
~35-04) covert

Our Entire Rental Library

. 73 off

(Many are practically new)

I

ic Stationery
(Boxes are slightly soiled)
One.box at regular
price and a second box
of same kind at ic.

Brand new
19 8 E

STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special
dent rates. Moe Laundry,
South First St., Phone 3916.

stu-
226
loc

-And many many more items too'numerous to mention.
Come over and browse - you might make a find.
II fllf I'c"

FOR RENT
SUITE with private bath and shower.
Also lovely double room with ad-
joining lavatory. Available now,
Kshnn1 or Rpntmhpr.

TTO I rf1

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