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April 11, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-11

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rni DAY, A1'itm 11, 1941

?AGE WO F WAY APRL 11 1_4

Speech Clubs
Will Convene

Here April

25

Dr. W. E. Gilman, Missouri
Educator, To Give Main
Address At Conference
The annual meeting of the Michi-
ghn Association of Teachers of
Speech and the Speech Conference
of the Schoolmasters Club will con-
vene here April 25.
Dr. Wilbur E. Gilman of the Uni-.
versity of Missouri will give the main
address of the session on "What
Should We Empasize in Speech
Courses?" at the luncheon meeting.
The section on secondary school
speech will be headed by Charles F.
Hampton of Marshall. "The Future
Scope of Speech Education in the
Average High School" will be the
subject of the panel discussion.
Prof. Frederick B. McKay of Mich-
igan State Normal College will ac't
as chairman of the college section. Dr.
Gilman will give his second address
on "What Are Our Present Respon-
sibilities as College Teachers of
Speech?"
Prof. John Kemper of the Uni-
versity Hospital will be the speaker on
the subject, "Surgical Correction of
Cleft and Its Relationship to Speech,"
which he will illustrate with slides
at the speech correction section.
At the sessions of the elementary
and intermediate section will hold'
demonstration of speech and expres-
sion and a demonstration of radio
technique.
The program of the conference will
be held in connection with the twen-
ty-fourth annual meeting of the
Michigan High School Forensic -As-
sociation.
Members of the conference will at-
tend the state championship debate
to be held April 25 in Hill Auditor-
ium.
-
First Presbyterian Guild
Elects Gelston President
Westminster Student Guild of the
First Presbyterian Church Its elect-
ted Robert Gelston, 42, president for
the coming year.
'Other officers are Lin Buck, '42Ed.,
vice president; Louise Wible, '42,
secretary and Grant Whipple, '42E,
treasurer.
Gelston, from Highland Park, is
the grandson of The Rev. Joseph M.
Gelston, at one time minister of the
Ann Arbor church for 19 years, and
the son of the present minister of the
Highland Park Presbyterian Church.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY .
TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c

Health Service Work Designed
To Aid Student In Adjustment
With the increased realization of evoked by scholastic matters, family
the importance of the psychologic difficulties and financial problems.
and emotional aspects of health," Also at this period problems relating
more students are seeking advice to sex adjustment are naturally not
spontaneously for such matters as infrequent, the psychiatrist pointed
objectivelyras tlfey would for a coin- out.
mon cold or infected fingerDr. Theo- "Persons, too, may be unusually
phile Raphael, health service Psy shy for one reason or another. They
chiatrist said yesterday. may become troubled with a social
Speaking of the objectives of the and academic inferiority. The whole
work, he explained "that it was con- effort of the mental hygienist is to
cerned fundamentally withthe prob- remove the anxiety element so that
lems and adjustment issues to be ex- the person can deal with the problem
pected in a highly selected and in objectively and enable the working
terms of the general population'su- out of a constructive solution and
perior grade of young men)and wom- such solutions there are."
en, with the aim of aiding these indi- There is a great deal of interest
viduals toward the fullest realiza- which has been steadily increasing in
tion of this superiority, colleges all over the country in this
"It is essentially a matter of assist- problem. Over 90 percent of the
ing individuals with the problems of schools are interested and 41 per cent
everyday living, particularly colleg- have already set up facilities to do
iate life, which have come to cause this work. From general experiences
perplexity, tensions and concern. The it is estimated that at least 10 per
bulk of the work is with problems cent" of the student population all
pathologically simple and relatively over the country would derive benefit
minor comparable to the so-called from such services adequately given.
cold or medium or less severity. Of
course as with the neglected cold,'
more serious results are potential,"
he stated.
Many individuals are meeting life J ~I flJ I7~
on this campus for the first time in- View'
dependently and faced by adult stan-
dards away from family ties. Manyn
need orientation at this juncture, he
said.
Frequently, concern and anxiety are John James Clarkson, whose works

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will be exhibited in the Rackham
Building Galleries until April 24, is

bothan abstract artist and a native
"ay F s aof Ann Arbor. This somewhat un-
usual combination has resulted in
To Open M ay . water-colors, oils, drawings, and a set
P of decided opinions on abstract art
and artists.
,Orchestra Mr. Clarkson has studied under
Noted Sigers, rhs Prof. Jean Paul Slusser of the Uni-
Plan Performances versity art department, and Dickin-
son. Hawthorne, John Sloane, and
The Forty-Eighth Annual May Hofmann. He has also traveled
Festival, sponsored by the University abroad in France and Spain "looking
Musical Society, will open May 7 in at museums."
Hill Auditorium with eleven soloists Abstract art, he feels, can be stated
and four organizations participating. as mathematics based on a whim.
Seven of the soloists will be singers The abstract is therefore a transla-
and three instrumentalists. Of the tion, not an imitation, of nature in
singers, three, Jarmila Novotna, so- terms of the materials at the artist's
prano; Suzanne Sten, mezzo-soprano, disposal. The ultimate end of the
and Enid Szantho, contralto, were abstractionist is the greatest possible
stellar personalities in the operas at force with perfect balance.
Prague, Budapest, and Salzburg be- Mr. Clarkson readily defends his
fore coming to America. art against those who criticize its dis-
Four men singers, all stars of the tortion. "If you don't think Rem-
Metropolitan Opera, will take part: brandt is distorted," he challenges,
Metropoltan TOer, ll tkeg pa: "just try to pose a model in a posi-
Lawrence Tibbett, long recognized as tion having the effect of Rembrandt's
America's outstanding baritone; Nor- to aigteefc fRmrnts
mricas Coutandihgrpiton'sdis- light. I have also shown friends that
man Cordon, the Metropolitan's it is impossible to force a model into
tinguished bass; Charles Kullman,. one of Michelangelo's poses. Any
tenor, and Mack Harrell, baritone, distortion in art is for the purpose of
The latter two are both new to Ann a more forceful statement."
Arbor. Of his own pictures now on exhibi-
The three instrumentalists are all tion, Mr. Clarkson believes his "Pink
great musicians in their respective Sweater" and "Knitting Lady" to be
fields. Jascha Heifetz, although stfll more in his chosen direction than
a young man, has won much glory the others. As for his local portraits
and honor since he started his career "when the demands of the abstract
at ten in Russia. The others: Gregor collide with the requirements of por-
Piatigorsky, violoncellist, and Jose traiture, the artist loses friends."
Iturbi, piano virtuoso and conductor, Mr. Clarkson believes that painting
are well known to musical audiences. should not be looked at with awe and
The Philadelphia Orchestra, snder deadly seriousness. "Would people
Eugene Ormandy, will appear with please go to galleries for fun!"' he
Saul Caston as associate conductor pleads. "Art has unjustly been put in
and Mr. Iturbi as guest conductor. a category with crocheting.
Pleated Caps Are Out Of Date
AsStyles For Nurses Change
4+----------- --

Debate Teams
To Be Honored
HereApril 30
Speech Groups To Award
Gold Burr-Patt Statues
To Intramural Finalists
Burr-Patt trophies will be award-
ed to the winning and runner-up
men's and women's intramural debate
teams at the Speech Honors Ban-
quet to be held April 30.
Clarence Carlson, '44, and Ber-
nard Krohn, '43, representing Allen-
Rumsey House. the winners of the
men's finals, will be honoredat the
banquet. Jerry Sheets, '43 and
Robert Gibson, '43, of Wenley House
and not of Allen-Rumsey as was re-
ported yesterday were the runners-
up in the final debate on the ques-
tion of military service.
In the women's pound Grace Volk-
man, '42, and Margaret Jackson, '42,
of Martha Cook, are the winners in
Group A. Two teams, the Kappa
Delta team of Mildred Ward, '41, and
Jean Clare, '43, and the team of
' Opal Shimmons, '42, and Esther
Tang, '41, tied for first in Group B.
The independendent team of Nan-
cy Filstrup, '43, and Louise Carp, '43,
will represent Group C in the finals
to be held after vacation.
The winners were determined by
their victories in the roundrobin and
elimination tournaments. The tour-
naments are held under the auspices
of the League, the Union, Delta Sig-
ma Rho and Athena.
More than 50 teams participated in
the two tournaments open to stu-
dents in dormitories, sororities, fra-
ternities and other residences. The
contests were judged by members of
the speech department and varsity
debaters.
Preservation
By Microfilm
Is Used Here
Microfilm, oten descibd a the
greatest advance in the recording of
the written word since printing, is
becoming an imnportant part in the
facilities of the University library.
Microfilm's advantage lies in the
ease and compactness of storage it
presents. The library is able to pre-
serve a complete tenm day record of the
New York Times on one hundred feet
of film and stores eighteen months
of The Times in a cabinet drawer
measuring 18 by 30 inches. The Chi-
cago Daily Tribune and the Detroit
News are also on file in microfilm.
The library is equipped with two
wall projectors, three reading ma-
chines, and a special fireproof cabinet
for the films. The bottom section of
'the cabinet contains a solution of
sodium dichromate which maintains
a constant humidity throughout the
storage space. The collection is locat-
ed on the fourth floor and is super-
vised by Miss Inez Bowler, librarian
of Graduate Reading Room 4.
SAt present the library is purchasing
microfilms of books printed in Eng-
land before 1550, thereby making
these costly volumes available to a
* -
grchatet ver nmbe rchsorins
anresets.ch we rrs al ope

-

FRIDAY, APRIL 11, 1941
VOL. LL No. 139
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices
To the Members of the University
Council: There will be a meeting
of the University Council on Monday,
April 21, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 1009
A. H.
Louis A. Hopkins,
Secretary

a
s
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A

advisedly upon their relation to the
Selective Service as soon as actions
are definitely taken which are in
formation by proper governmental
authorities. Students are therefore
idvised to wait until after the spring
vacation to make their plans for the
uture.
Louis A. Hopkins, Chairman,
Deans' Committee
on National Defense
Students Who Have Made Appli-
cation for Commissions in the U.S.
Naval Reserve should complete the
assembly of the ,supporting papers,
except letters, and appear for inter-
view by two officers prior to starting
their Spring Vacation, if practicable.
This applies to Engineering students
as a definite deadline.
Lyal A. Davidson, Capt. U.S. Navy,
Professor of Naval Science
and Tactics.
May Festival Tickets: The "over-
the-counter" sale of all remaining
Festival tickets will begin Monday

morning, April 21, and will, continue
so long as tickets remain, at the of-
fices of the University Musical So-
ciety in Burton Memorial Tower.
Detroit Northwestern High School
Graduates: A one-year tuition schol-
arship in this University, in honor of
Miss Julia E. Gettemy, B.L. '98, for
many years teacher of public speak-
ing and dramatics at the Northwest-
ern High School, Detroit, is being
offered.by her sister, Miss Winifred
Gettemy of East Lansing. The holder
must be a graduate of Northwestern
High School, preferably a man, and
one who is specializing in English or
Speech; he must have a scholarship
average of at least B. Letters of ap.
plication should be sent to B. J. Riv-
ett, Principal, Northwestern High
School, Detroit, with a transcript of
the applicant's University record to
date, before April 15.
Candidates for the Teacher's Cer-
tificate for June, 1941 are requested
(Continued on Page 4)

To the Students Subject To Selec-e
tive Service: Following the springN
vacation the Deans' Committee ont
National Defense plans to announce
a procedure which the University willa
follow in making recommendations to
the draft boards for the deferment of
students. As no deferment i possible
by group classification, each student
who requests deferment will be given
careful consideration by an appropri-t
ate University officer. The issuance1
of recommendations will depend upon _
the length of time necessary for the
completion of the work required for a
degree for which the student is en-
rolled and the nature of that work as
training and preparation for the pro-
gram of National Defense as it con-
cerns the national health, safety and
interest. The principles of the pro-
cedure will be built upon the advice of
Brig. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, Deputy
Director of the National Selective
Service, as announced on March 7,
1941, and as interpreted by the Amer-
ican Council on Education through
which Gen. Hershey communicates to
the colleges and universities. Also
the procedure will include plans
which are now being issued from the
National Selective Service Headquar-
ters at Washington for the postpone-
ment of induction of students. In any
event, it is suggested that students of .
the University will be able to act more

(P

--

=4

£ Treat for Epicures-
-is the meal that treats you to the best
there is in health and eating pleasure!
WIN*ES -- Bottled and Draught -- BEER

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Flautz Cafe
122 West Washington

7070

R

owTil

~~0_

e

CHURCH

D IRECTORY

I

FOR RENT
TO RENT: 2658 W. Liberty Road,
one mile out. Beautiful, quiet, land-
scaped country apartment. Univer-
sity associate desires young man.
to share. 4 rooms, private tile bath,
shower, garage, porch, heat, furn-
iture, refrigerator, new electric
range. Cheap. 2-1491. 337
LOST and FOUND
LOST - Phi Delt Pin. Initials J.G.
on back. Near Union. Contact Phi
Delt House immediately. 338
WANTED TO BUY-4
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR SUITS, OVERCOATS,
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
SIANS, MINKS. PHONE ANN AR-
BOR 6304 for APPOINTMENTS.
SAM.
TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
TYPIST --Experienced. L. M. Hey-
w'ood, 414 Maynard St. Phone 5689.
27c
VIOLA STEIN--Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327; 706 Oakland.
HEATING and PLUMBING
PLUMBING & HEATING-Let Sam
C. Andres make your needed re-
pairs over the holidays. Phone
7102, 30c
MISCELLANEOUS -
THESIS BINDING--Mimeogriaphing.
Brumfield & Brunmfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.

(Editor's Note: This is the third of a
series of articles on the University of
Michigan School of Nursing.)
Quoted from the regulations for
student appearance and conduct in
uniform:
1. Make-up must not be obvious -
no long finger nails may be worn and
no deep tones of nail polish.
2. No jewelry may be worn.
3. No flowers may be worn on uni-
form.
4. Apron is to be thirteen inches
from the floor. Uniform is to be very
slightly shorter, but not more than
one inch. There should be two pearl
studs worn in the band of apron.
5. Students may go in uniform to
within a radius of one block from
Couzens Hall. Students may not en-
tertain in uniform.
These rules may seem very strict to
other girls on campus whose only
problem is deciding which of a dozen
sweaters to wearl on which day, but
rules have i'draxed considerably since
the early days when the nursing
school was in its infancy.
Back in the late 1800's when the
girls were making their own uniforms,
full length dresses were the vogue
with long leg of mutton sleeves and
ruffled caps. With the turn of the

century came a change of costume
- sleeves were long and straight and
caps were pleated organdy with a
lace edge and stood straight up on
the head like a crown. It was the
rule in 1912 to wear caps two inches
back from the hairline.
Today caps are little and starched.
They are perched way back on the
head at a precarious but becoming
angle. Aprons, which used to drag,
are now 13 inches from the floor.
Uniform regulations are still in the
process of change, however. Until this
year all freshmen and sophomore
nurses had to wear black shoes and
stockings but this fall all classes will
blossom out in white, a pleasant inno-
vation for the girls in white.
The "Capping Ceremony" which oc-
curred this year on March 31, is the
occasion on which the freshmen are
officially accepted into the school.
Before this time they wear short-
sleeved blue uniforms with starched
collars and cuffs. On the important
capping day the girls receive their
caps and kerchiefs. The sophomores,
as they are now called, wear plain
white caps, juniors have narrow black
bands on their caps and the seniors
can be recognized by their wide black
bands.

DAILY 2-4-7-9 P.M.
TODAY & Saturday

i

Another laugh and
thrill screen hit by
" theauthor of
"Little Women"
LOUISA MAY ALCOTT'S

I

Rfftle

1

'I. _____

.V5.

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH.
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
The Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Assistant Min.
George Faxon, Organist and Choirmaster
7:00 A.M. Choral Holy Communion. Music by
St. Andrew's Choir.
9:00 A.M. Choral Holy Communion. Music by
Junior Church Girls' Choir.
11:00 A.M. Choral Holy Communion and Sermon
by The Reverend H'enry Lewis. Music by
St. Andrew's Choir.
4:00 P.M. Children's Easter Service. Music by
Junior Church Girls' Choir.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
South Fourth Avenue.
Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
7:00 A.M. Early Service. A breakfast will be
served after the service.
9:00 A.M. German Easter Service,
10:00 A.M. Main Easter Service with special
music by the junior and senior choirs.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
10:30 A.M. Sunday Service.
11:45 A.M. Sunday School.
Free reading room at 206 E. Liberty St. open-
daily except Sundays and holidays from 11:30
A.M. to 5 P.M. and on Saturdays till 9 P.M.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Sts.
Dr. Leonard A. Parr,, Miister.,
Director of Music, Mrs. Mary McCall Stub-
bins.
The Easter morning service will be held at
10:45. All members of. the Church School will
be present for the early part of the service. The
following is the program:
Organ Prelude, "Christ Is Risen" ........ Bach
Trumpet Solo, "Open the Gates of the Temple"
... ... ... ... ... ...... K napp
Leslie Grimord
The Easter Salutation
Processional Hymn
The Easter Greeting
Gloria Patri
Slo, 'Tu the J'(Ind of the Sabbat i" ' Speaks
Kai thierine S.rich
The Easter Story
The Easter Offering
Anthem, "As It Began to Dawn"
..... . . Flaxington-Harker

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw-Dial 2-4466
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister
Lillian Dilts, Assistant
William Barnard, Director of Music
9:30 A.M. Church School. Classes for all age
groups.
10:45 A.M. Morning Woship. Easter Day - "The
Hesitant Certainty"- subject of Dr. Lemon's
sermon.
10:45 A.M. Nursery during morning worship.
8:00 P.M. The Sunday Evening Club.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State St. between Washington and Huron.
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares, and
J. Edward Lantz.
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director; Mary
Eleanor Porter, organist.
8:00 and 10:30 A.M. Identical Easter Services.
Dr. Brashares' subject is "Easter"
.10:30 A.M. Church School for Nursery, Be-
ginners, and Primary Departments. Parents
may leave children while attending church.
6:00 to 8:00 P.M. Tea and Discussion, for
Wesleyan Guild.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron.
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister.
Jack Ossewaarde, Organist and Director of
Music.
10:30 A.M.-12:30 P.M. A unified service of wor-
ship and Study. Sermon: "Easter Effirma-
tions."
10:30 A.M. Ordinance Baptism.
6:30 P.M. High School Young People's Fellow-
ship.
6:30 P.M. No meeting of Roger William's
Guild.
THE LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Sponsored jointly by
Zion and Trinity Lutheran Churches.
Zion Lutheran Church,
E. Washington St. at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M. Easter Worship Service. Sermon:
"The King Triumphant" by Rev. E. C. Stell-
horn.
- Trinity ILutheran Cliiurch,
E. William St. at S. Fifth Ave.
6:00 A.M. Sunrise Easter Service. Sermon:
"The Resurrected King of the Kingdom of
God", by Rev. Henry O. Yoder.
10:30 A.M. Chief Worship Service. Sermon:

III

IIII

with
KAY FRANCIS
JACK OAKIE
GEORGE
BANCROFT
Jimmy Lydoni
Ann Gillis
Charles Esmond
--nd--
been recadingab
RKQ RADIO
Picture

.,1
out
0

MICHIGAN NOW!
INGRID WARNER
BERGMAN *BAXTER
40A/I, 1*) owg sois

MARCH OF TIME
F.B.I. 1941"
WORjL) Nl.WS
JAMES (AGNEIY
(V IrrIA nW;II A VII I ANII)

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